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Re: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater 1940

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  • Nicholas Fuller
    Diplomat s Folly struck me as very Hitchcockian: study of a weak man, without much mystery.   As for writers I d like to see adapted - I ve said it
    Message 1 of 8 , Jun 6, 2008
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      Diplomat's Folly struck me as very Hitchcockian: study of a weak man, without much mystery.
       
      As for writers I'd like to see adapted - I've said it before, and I'll say it again: HC Bailey.  The short stories are ideally suited to 50 minute adaptations; they vary in mood and tone; they can be "relevant" (child abuse, political power, murderous obession, et al, although seen through a religious lens); and you have a regular team (Fortune, Lomas, Bell).
       
      Mitchell would also be worth doing - if they were faithful!  They'd have to wait another ten years or so until the Rigg fiasco was forgotten, because Speedy Death is an effective debut.  Later ones have Laura Menzies, and the use of real places could be a good incentive for the British tourist industry to get involved.

      Nick

      Long live Meyerbeer forever!  "Pour cette cause sainte, j'obéirai sans crainte, à mon Dieu, à mon roi!"

      --- On Fri, 6/6/08, vegetableduck <cjevans@...> wrote:

      From: vegetableduck <cjevans@...>
      Subject: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater 1940
      To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
      Received: Friday, 6 June, 2008, 5:48 PM






      I completed reviewing Henry Wade's books recently and found myself
      thinking, why don't they film any of his books! Most of the novels
      he
      wrote up to 1940 would be eminently filmable, it seems to me.

      The Verdict of You All would make compelling viewing, though I've
      always been dubious of those murder mechanics!

      The Missing Partners would make a good lighter-style early Suchet-
      Poirot film.

      The Duke of York's Steps would need some tweaking, but has much of
      interest.

      The Dying Alderman would be excellent.

      No Friendly Drop even better.

      Others that would seem to be excellent candidates for adapatation
      are Mist on the Saltings (love triangle, great setting), Constable,
      Guard Thyself! (murder in a police station), Heir Presumptive (a
      biting inverted), The High Sheriff (blackmail drama) and Lonely
      Magdalen (a police procedural with considerable character interest).

      It's a shame to see such good material "go to waste," as we go
      through our third Miss MArple, etc.

      What other GAD novelists would you like to see adapted for
      television?

      Curt
















      Get the name you always wanted with the new y7mail email address.
      www.yahoo7.com.au/mail

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    • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
      I agree with Nick that Bailey would be a good choice, though they would need a very good actor to play Reggie. It would need the same inspired casting that
      Message 2 of 8 , Jun 6, 2008
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        I agree with Nick that Bailey would be a good choice, though they would need a very good actor to play Reggie. It would need the same inspired casting that gave us Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes, David Suchet as Poirot and Leo McKern as Rumpole.

        And I know that I said this before, but for American authors I think Patrick Quentin/Q. Patrick/Jonthan Stagge would be a great choice to adapt to film. It would be especially nice if they were filmed period.

        Richard


        To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.comFrom: stoke_moran@...: Fri, 6 Jun 2008 01:25:16 -0700Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater 1940




        Diplomat's Folly struck me as very Hitchcockian: study of a weak man, without much mystery. As for writers I'd like to see adapted - I've said it before, and I'll say it again: HC Bailey.  The short stories are ideally suited to 50 minute adaptations; they vary in mood and tone; they can be "relevant" (child abuse, political power, murderous obession, et al, although seen through a religious lens); and you have a regular team (Fortune, Lomas, Bell). Mitchell would also be worth doing - if they were faithful!  They'd have to wait another ten years or so until the Rigg fiasco was forgotten, because Speedy Death is an effective debut.  Later ones have Laura Menzies, and the use of real places could be a good incentive for the British tourist industry to get involved.NickLong live Meyerbeer forever!  "Pour cette cause sainte, j'obéirai sans crainte, à mon Dieu, à mon roi!"--- On Fri, 6/6/08, vegetableduck <cjevans@...> wrote:From: vegetableduck <cjevans@...>Subject: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater 1940To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.comReceived: Friday, 6 June, 2008, 5:48 PMI completed reviewing Henry Wade's books recently and found myself thinking, why don't they film any of his books! Most of the novels he wrote up to 1940 would be eminently filmable, it seems to me.The Verdict of You All would make compelling viewing, though I've always been dubious of those murder mechanics!The Missing Partners would make a good lighter-style early Suchet-Poirot film.The Duke of York's Steps would need some tweaking, but has much of interest.The Dying Alderman would be excellent.No Friendly Drop even better.Others that would seem to be excellent candidates for adapatation are Mist on the Saltings (love triangle, great setting), Constable, Guard Thyself! (murder in a police station), Heir Presumptive (a biting inverted), The High Sheriff (blackmail drama) and Lonely Magdalen (a police procedural with considerable character interest).It's a shame to see such good material "go to waste," as we go through our third Miss MArple, etc.What other GAD novelists would you like to see adapted for television?CurtGet the name you always wanted with the new y7mail email address.www.yahoo7.com.au/mail[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Henrique Valle
        The Blind Barber may not be the best of Carr s books, but I always thought it would make a good movie! Henrique Valle ... From: RICHARD LIEDHOLM
        Message 3 of 8 , Jun 6, 2008
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          The Blind Barber may not be the best of Carr's books, but I always thought it would make a good movie!
          Henrique Valle


          ----- Original Message ----
          From: RICHARD LIEDHOLM <jandrliedholm@...>
          To: gadetection@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, June 6, 2008 1:56:42 PM
          Subject: RE: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater 1940



          I agree with Nick that Bailey would be a good choice, though they would need a very good actor to play Reggie. It would need the same inspired casting that gave us Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes, David Suchet as Poirot and Leo McKern as Rumpole.

          And I know that I said this before, but for American authors I think Patrick Quentin/Q. Patrick/Jonthan Stagge would be a great choice to adapt to film. It would be especially nice if they were filmed period.

          Richard

          To: GAdetection@ yahoogroups. comFrom: stoke_moran@ yahoo.comDate: Fri, 6 Jun 2008 01:25:16 -0700Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater 1940

          Diplomat's Folly struck me as very Hitchcockian: study of a weak man, without much mystery.  As for writers I'd like to see adapted - I've said it before, and I'll say it again: HC Bailey.  The short stories are ideally suited to 50 minute adaptations; they vary in mood and tone; they can be "relevant" (child abuse, political power, murderous obession, et al, although seen through a religious lens); and you have a regular team (Fortune, Lomas, Bell).  Mitchell would also be worth doing - if they were faithful!  They'd have to wait another ten years or so until the Rigg fiasco was forgotten, because Speedy Death is an effective debut.  Later ones have Laura Menzies, and the use of real places could be a good incentive for the British tourist industry to get involved.NickLong live Meyerbeer forever!  "Pour cette cause sainte, j'obéirai sans crainte, à mon Dieu, à mon roi!"--- On Fri, 6/6/08, vegetableduck
          <cjevans@midsouth. rr.com> wrote:From: vegetableduck <cjevans@midsouth. rr.com>Subject: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater 1940To: GAdetection@ yahoogroups. comReceived: Friday, 6 June, 2008, 5:48 PMI completed reviewing Henry Wade's books recently and found myself thinking, why don't they film any of his books! Most of the novels he wrote up to 1940 would be eminently filmable, it seems to me.The Verdict of You All would make compelling viewing, though I've always been dubious of those murder mechanics!The Missing Partners would make a good lighter-style early Suchet-Poirot film.The Duke of York's Steps would need some tweaking, but has much of interest.The Dying Alderman would be excellent.No Friendly Drop even better.Others that would seem to be excellent candidates for adapatation are Mist on the Saltings (love triangle, great setting), Constable, Guard Thyself! (murder in a police station), Heir Presumptive (a biting inverted), The High
          Sheriff (blackmail drama) and Lonely Magdalen (a police procedural with considerable character interest).It' s a shame to see such good material "go to waste," as we go through our third Miss MArple, etc.What other GAD novelists would you like to see adapted for television?CurtGet the name you always wanted with the new y7mail email address.www. yahoo7.com. au/mail[Non- text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • vegetableduck
          I think the Baileys would be good for film, but they would need to tone the Reggieisms down a bit. Curt ... would need a very good actor to play Reggie. It
          Message 4 of 8 , Jun 6, 2008
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            I think the Baileys would be good for film, but they would need to
            tone the Reggieisms down a bit.

            Curt

            --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, RICHARD LIEDHOLM
            <jandrliedholm@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            > I agree with Nick that Bailey would be a good choice, though they
            would need a very good actor to play Reggie. It would need the same
            inspired casting that gave us Jeremy Brett as Sherlock Holmes, David
            Suchet as Poirot and Leo McKern as Rumpole.
            >
            > And I know that I said this before, but for American authors I
            think Patrick Quentin/Q. Patrick/Jonthan Stagge would be a great
            choice to adapt to film. It would be especially nice if they were
            filmed period.
            >
            > Richard
            >
            >
            > To: GAdetection@...: stoke_moran@...: Fri, 6 Jun 2008 01:25:16 -
            0700Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater 1940
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Diplomat's Folly struck me as very Hitchcockian: study of a weak
            man, without much mystery. As for writers I'd like to see
            adapted - I've said it before, and I'll say it again: HC
            Bailey.  The short stories are ideally suited to 50 minute
            adaptations; they vary in mood and tone; they can be "relevant"
            (child abuse, political power, murderous obession, et al, although
            seen through a religious lens); and you have a regular team
            (Fortune, Lomas, Bell). Mitchell would also be worth doing - if
            they were faithful!  They'd have to wait another ten years or
            so until the Rigg fiasco was forgotten, because Speedy Death is an
            effective debut.  Later ones have Laura Menzies, and the use of
            real places could be a good incentive for the British tourist
            industry to get involved.NickLong live Meyerbeer forever!
              "Pour cette cause sainte, j'obéirai sans crainte, à mon Dieu,
            à mon roi!"--- On Fri, 6/6/08, vegetableduck cjevans@... wrote:From:
            vegetableduck cjevans@...Subject: [GAdetection] Mystery Theater
            1940To: GAdetection@...: Friday, 6 June, 2008, 5:48 PMI completed
            reviewing Henry Wade's books recently and found myself thinking, why
            don't they film any of his books! Most of the novels he wrote up to
            1940 would be eminently filmable, it seems to me.The Verdict of You
            All would make compelling viewing, though I've always been dubious
            of those murder mechanics!The Missing Partners would make a good
            lighter-style early Suchet-Poirot film.The Duke of York's Steps
            would need some tweaking, but has much of interest.The Dying
            Alderman would be excellent.No Friendly Drop even better.Others that
            would seem to be excellent candidates for adapatation are Mist on
            the Saltings (love triangle, great setting), Constable, Guard
            Thyself! (murder in a police station), Heir Presumptive (a biting
            inverted), The High Sheriff (blackmail drama) and Lonely Magdalen (a
            police procedural with considerable character interest).It's a shame
            to see such good material "go to waste," as we go through our third
            Miss MArple, etc.What other GAD novelists would you like to see
            adapted for television?CurtGet the name you always wanted with the
            new y7mail email address.www.yahoo7.com.au/mail[Non-text portions of
            this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          • Jeffrey Marks
            Richard, I always thought that Victoria Principal would have been an ideal Iris for the Duluth books, but alas, she (and I) have aged since I first thought
            Message 5 of 8 , Jun 6, 2008
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              Richard, I always thought that Victoria Principal would have been an ideal Iris for the Duluth books, but alas, she (and I) have aged since I first thought that.

              Jeff


              Jeffrey Marks
              www.jeffreymarks.com
              Check out my website for news about my books and marketing tips of the month
              Atomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950s
              Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of the Screwball Mystery
              Anthony Boucher: A Biobibliography -- now out


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kevin Killian
              Jeff, you are probably right. I always think of Iris as being a cross between Gene Tierney (who did wind up playing her in BLACK WIDOW) and Hedy Lamarr.
              Message 6 of 8 , Jun 6, 2008
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                Jeff, you are probably right. I always think of Iris as being a
                cross between Gene Tierney (who did wind up playing her in BLACK
                WIDOW) and Hedy Lamarr. Today's equivalent would probably be
                Angelina Jolie, and she would probably be good, either in the early
                books when Iris is still half-nuts, or the later ones when she starts
                cheating or whatever it is on Peter.

                Kevin K.


                >Richard, I always thought that Victoria Principal would have been an
                >ideal Iris for the Duluth books, but alas, she (and I) have aged
                >since I first thought that.
                >
                >Jeff
                >
                >
                >Jeffrey Marks
                >www.jeffreymarks.com
                >Check out my website for news about my books and marketing tips of the month
                >Atomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950s
                >Who Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of the Screwball Mystery
                >Anthony Boucher: A Biobibliography -- now out
                >
                >
                >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
                >
                >------------------------------------
                >
                >Yahoo! Groups Links
                >
                >
                >
              • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
                How about the actress who plays Lana Lane on Smallville? Um, I regret I can t remember what her name is, but she is gorgeous in a Gene Tierney sort of way,
                Message 7 of 8 , Jun 9, 2008
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                  How about the actress who plays Lana Lane on Smallville? Um, I regret I can't remember what her name is, but she is gorgeous in a Gene Tierney sort of way, and she's not a bad actress either. I would say that she should be about just the age that Iris is when Peter first meets her in A Puzzle for Fools. Mid-20s or so, yes? I think casting Peter would be harder...

                  Richard


                  To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.comFrom: Jeffrmarks@...: Fri, 6 Jun 2008 19:59:32 -0400Subject: [GAdetection] Re: Mystery Theater 1940




                  Richard, I always thought that Victoria Principal would have been an ideal Iris for the Duluth books, but alas, she (and I) have aged since I first thought that. JeffJeffrey Markswww.jeffreymarks.com Check out my website for news about my books and marketing tips of the monthAtomic Renaissance: Women Mystery Writers of the 1940s/1950sWho Was That Lady? Craig Rice: The Queen of the Screwball MysteryAnthony Boucher: A Biobibliography -- now out[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







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