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Movies/TV vs. the Written Word

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  • miketooney49
    Movies/TV vs. the Written Word Apropos of recent discussions concerning filmed versions of mystery fiction, Gerald So has his own take in the latest edition
    Message 1 of 1 , Apr 1, 2008
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      Movies/TV vs. the Written Word

      Apropos of recent discussions concerning
      filmed versions of mystery fiction, Gerald So
      has his own take in the latest edition (Spring
      2008) of Mysterical-E:

      http://www.mystericale.com/

      Then click on "Articles" and scroll down to
      "Mysterical-Eye on TV and Film."

      Also, Jim Doherty continues his survey of
      how two famous hard-boiled fiction writers
      reused elements from their pulp fiction short
      works in longer novels; after all, a good idea
      is a good idea (SPOILER ALERT):

      "In the last column, I talked a bit about how
      Dashiell Hammett used themes and plot
      devices from previously published short stories
      when he was developing his most famous novel,
      'The Maltese Falcon' (Knopf, 1930)."
      ...............................................
      "I also mentioned in the last issue that, when
      Hammett's successor, Raymond Chandler, took
      up the mantel of most revered writer of hard-
      boiled private eye fiction, he also made a point
      of recycling previously published short fiction
      for his book-length work. In fact, he's much
      better-known for it than Hammett ever was,
      probably because he was much more direct
      about it. Rather than taking themes, characters,
      and plot devices and reusing them in new ways,
      Chandler simply expanded his short stories to
      book-length."

      Good scholarship from Jim Doherty.

      Scroll down to "I Like 'Em Tough" for the
      straight dope.
      ********************************************
      "Even on Central Avenue, not the quietest dressed
      street in the world, he looked about as inconspicuous
      as a tarantula on a slice of angel food."
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