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TCM Crime Dramas (February 12-18)

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  • miketooney49
    Slim pickings this week for detective film fans unless you like your detectives either completely incompetent or completely corrupt.
    Message 1 of 18 , Feb 8, 2008
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      Slim pickings this week for detective film fans unless you like
      your detectives either completely incompetent or completely
      corrupt.

      *************************************
      (All times Eastern Standard U. S. A.)

      February 12th--Tuesday

      3:15 AM--"Lady for a Day" (1933)
      A gangster helps an old apple-vendor pose as a society woman
      to fool her visiting daughter.
      Cast: May Robson, Warren William, Guy Kibbee.
      Dir: Frank Capra. BW-96 mins, TV-G
      --A Damon Runyon story; this one was remade in 1961 as
      "Pocketful of Miracles" with Bette Davis and Glenn Ford.

      5:00 AM--"Alibi" (1929)
      A mobster kills a police officer and uses the victim's daughter
      as his alibi.
      Cast: Chester Morris, Mae Busch, Regis Toomey.
      Dir: Roland West. BW-83 mins, TV-PG
      --A "creaky, early-talkie melodrama .... of note for its
      striking visuals and sets" (Leonard Maltin).

      6:30 AM--"Window, The" (1949)
      A boy who always lies witnesses a murder but can't get
      anyone but the killer to believe him.
      Cast: Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy.
      Dir: Ted Tetzlaff. BW-74 mins, TV-G, CC
      --Aesop gets an update via Cornell Woolrich; great premise
      for a crime drama.

      9:30 AM--"Mannequin" (1937)
      A small-time crook's wife falls for a shipping magnate.
      Cast: Joan Crawford, Spencer Tracy, Alan Curtis.
      Dir: Frank Borzage. BW-95 mins, TV-PG, CC
      --"Prototype rags-to-riches soaper .... Predictable script, but
      nice job by stars, usual MGM gloss (even in the tenements!)"
      (Leonard Maltin).


      February 15th--Friday

      2:15 PM--"Pink Panther, The" (1964)
      In the first Inspector Clouseau film, the bumbling French police
      detective tries to stop a notorious jewel thief from nabbing a
      princess' diamond.
      Cast: Peter Sellers, David Niven, Robert Wagner.
      Dir: Blake Edwards. C-115 mins, TV-PG, CC, Letterbox Format
      --Best of the series; the titular Panther is a valuable jewel.
      Niven later admitted great annoyance at being upstaged by the
      animated pussycat; c'est la vie, Dave.

      4:15 PM--"Pink Panther Strikes Again, The" (1976)
      After driving his boss to insanity, Inspector Clouseau has to
      stop him from destroying the world.
      Cast: Peter Sellers, Herbert Lom, Lesley-Anne Down.
      Dir: Blake Edwards. C-103 mins, TV-14, CC, Letterbox Format
      --Lom gives it everything he's got and steals the film; fifth movie
      in the Pink Panther series.


      February 17th--Sunday

      2:15 AM--"Absence of Malice" (1981)
      An ambitious reporter unwittingly slanders a businessman
      under federal investigation.
      Cast: Paul Newman, Sally Field, Melinda Dillon.
      Dir: Sydney Pollack. C-116 mins, TV-14, CC, Letterbox Format


      February 18th--Monday

      1:00 AM--"L. A. Confidential" (1997)
      Detectives clash while investigating political corruption.
      Cast: Russell Crowe, Kim Basinger, Kevin Spacey.
      Dir: Curtis Hanson. C-138 mins, TV-MA, Letterbox Format
      --"Vividly atmospheric tale of L. A. in the early 1950s, run by
      corrupt cops" (Maltin); DeVito was born to play sleazy characters.
      Grim movie based on a just-as-grim James Ellroy novel.
    • finsbry@aol.com
      ... I saw this film as a kid--on the 5 o clock movie before dinner back in the early 60s. It scared the you know what out of me, and I remembered it forever.
      Message 2 of 18 , Feb 11, 2008
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        In a message dated 2/8/08 12:04:52 PM, miketooney49@... writes:


        > 6:30 AM--"Window, The" (1949)
        > A boy who always lies witnesses a murder but can't get
        > anyone but the killer to believe him.
        > Cast: Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy.
        > Dir: Ted Tetzlaff. BW-74 mins, TV-G, CC
        > --Aesop gets an update via Cornell Woolrich; great premise
        > for a crime drama.
        >

        I saw this film as a kid--on the 5 o'clock movie before dinner back in the
        early 60s. It scared the you know what out of me, and I remembered it forever.
        When I saw it in the store for rental, I grabbed it. It still can send chills
        up my spine-what kid doesn't fear not being believed? It isn't available in
        DVD-but I bought a tape of it recently.

        I never knew my fav author of all time wrote the short story it was based on.
        Go figure.
        Thanks again for the list.

        Diane Plumley


        **************
        The year's hottest artists on the red carpet at
        the Grammy Awards. Go to AOL Music.

        (http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • miketooney49
        ... 6:30 AM-- Window, The (1949) A boy who always lies witnesses a murder but can t get anyone but the killer to believe him. Cast: Bobby Driscoll, Barbara
        Message 3 of 18 , Feb 11, 2008
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          --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, finsbry@... wrote:

          6:30 AM--"Window, The" (1949)
          A boy who always lies witnesses a murder but can't get
          anyone but the killer to believe him.
          Cast: Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy.
          Dir: Ted Tetzlaff. BW-74 mins, TV-G, CC
          --Aesop gets an update via Cornell Woolrich; great premise
          for a crime drama.

          I saw this film as a kid--on the 5 o'clock movie before dinner back
          in the early 60s. It scared the you know what out of me, and I
          remembered it forever.

          When I saw it in the store for rental, I grabbed it. It still can
          send chills up my spine-what kid doesn't fear not being believed? It
          isn't available in DVD-but I bought a tape of it recently.

          I never knew my fav author of all time wrote the short story it was
          based on. Go figure. Thanks again for the list.

          Diane Plumley

          --You're most welcome, Diane. I had the same reaction
          to "The Window" when I was about ten or eleven--and
          for the same reason!
        • Jon Jermey
          Wallace, Edgar - The Forger (1927) aka The Clever One Much of Wallace s best work comes from the mid-1920s, and The Forger is no exception. Representing the
          Message 4 of 18 , Feb 12, 2008
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            Wallace, Edgar - The Forger (1927) aka The Clever One

            Much of Wallace's best work comes from the mid-1920s, and The Forger is
            no exception. Representing the police we have the enigmatic and
            insightful Superintendent Bourke -- a worthy colleague for even the
            great 'Sooper' -- and the despicable and corrupt Inspector Rouper. On
            the civilian side we find Jane Wells, a clever and resourceful heroine
            -- who marries Peter Clifton for his money and later finds herself
            falling for him -- Basil Hale, the amusing cad, the appalling Madam
            Untersohn, and at the centre of it all Peter Clifton himself and his
            nerve doctor Donald Cheyne Wells.

            Expertly forged notes are being passed, and Peter Clifton is implicated.
            With lunacy in his family, can even he be sure he is not guilty? More
            and more evidence points to his involvement, not just in counterfeiting
            but in murder. Is Peter the mysterious Clever One? His new wife Jane
            quickly grows into her new role and turns detective to try and clear his
            name. Justice is done at last, of course, as a diabolical plot is
            unravelled. Suspense is maintained to the end and criminals as well as
            heroes act with charm and dignity. First-rate Wallace and highly
            recommended.

            Jon.

            The Forger will shortly be available for download from Gutenberg Australia.
          • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
            I m so glad to read that you loved The Window. It is a film I ve cherished for years as well, and while it may not stand quite as tall as Hitchcock s
            Message 5 of 18 , Feb 12, 2008
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              I'm so glad to read that you loved The Window. It is a film I've cherished for years as well, and while it may not stand quite as tall as Hitchcock's masterpiece Rear Window, it is a very well made, suspenseful film. Bobby Driscoll is very good as the young boy, well deserving the praise (and Oscar) that he received. The Woolrich-based films have been coming out slowly with the scattered releases of Leopard Man, Black Angel and Rear Window. The Window would be most welcome as would a release of Phantom Lady.

              At least John Dickson Carr fans can feel a bit happy, as the film Dangerous Crossing is being released on DVD March 11th. This, as most know, is based on his famous radio play, Cabin B-13. I've never seen the film and I am looking forward to it.

              And for private detective fans, Season 1 (volume 1) of Burke's Law with Gene Barry is coming out at the end of April, and Mannix season 1, with Mike Conners is scheduled for this summer. Some sources say early June though no confirmation has been set as yet. So the mystery-private detective series are starting to come out. You'll really hear a shout of joy from me when Cannon and Harry-O are announced. Those were two of my favorites!

              Richard


              To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.comFrom: finsbry@...: Mon, 11 Feb 2008 18:20:16 -0500Subject: Re: [GAdetection] TCM Crime Dramas (February 12-18)




              In a message dated 2/8/08 12:04:52 PM, miketooney49@... writes:> 6:30 AM--"Window, The" (1949)> A boy who always lies witnesses a murder but can't get> anyone but the killer to believe him.> Cast: Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy.> Dir: Ted Tetzlaff. BW-74 mins, TV-G, CC> --Aesop gets an update via Cornell Woolrich; great premise> for a crime drama.> I saw this film as a kid--on the 5 o'clock movie before dinner back in the early 60s. It scared the you know what out of me, and I remembered it forever. When I saw it in the store for rental, I grabbed it. It still can send chills up my spine-what kid doesn't fear not being believed? It isn't available in DVD-but I bought a tape of it recently.I never knew my fav author of all time wrote the short story it was based on. Go figure.Thanks again for the list.Diane Plumley**************The year's hottest artists on the red carpet at the Grammy Awards. Go to AOL Music.(http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]







              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • vegetableduck
              Jon, I think this was one that he did first as a play? Curt ... Australia.
              Message 6 of 18 , Feb 12, 2008
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                Jon, I think this was one that he did first as a play?

                Curt

                --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Jon Jermey <jonjermey@...> wrote:
                >
                > Wallace, Edgar - The Forger (1927) aka The Clever One
                >
                > First-rate Wallace and highly
                > recommended.
                >
                > Jon.
                >
                > The Forger will shortly be available for download from Gutenberg
                Australia.
                >
              • Jon Jermey
                He did several books as plays first, I believe -- this one takes place largely in only three or four locations, so it s quite possible that it was originally a
                Message 7 of 18 , Feb 12, 2008
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                  He did several books as plays first, I believe -- this one takes place
                  largely in only three or four locations, so it's quite possible that it
                  was originally a play.

                  Jon.

                  vegetableduck wrote:
                  > Jon, I think this was one that he did first as a play?
                  >
                  > Curt
                  >
                • monescu4
                  I m afraid you might be a bit disappointed in DANGEROUS CROSSING. Although the film is not without merit, they somehow gum up the last few minutes of the film,
                  Message 8 of 18 , Feb 12, 2008
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                    I'm afraid you might be a bit disappointed in DANGEROUS CROSSING.
                    Although the film is not without merit, they somehow gum up the last
                    few minutes of the film, not making clear what I believe is the
                    cleverest aspect of the plot (why a crewmember-- who is not lying--
                    claims that he only saw one passenger go up the gangplank). Dickson
                    Carr was able to clear that up in one line of a short radio play, but
                    the screenwriter somehow couldn't fit it in to a screenplay of twice
                    the length. Much more satisfying is the 1950 film SO LONG AT THE
                    FAIR, based on the old Paris Exposition disappearance story (and of
                    which Carr's story was a clever variation).


                    --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, RICHARD LIEDHOLM
                    <jandrliedholm@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    > I'm so glad to read that you loved The Window. It is a film I've
                    cherished for years as well, and while it may not stand quite as tall
                    as Hitchcock's masterpiece Rear Window, it is a very well made,
                    suspenseful film. Bobby Driscoll is very good as the young boy, well
                    deserving the praise (and Oscar) that he received. The Woolrich-
                    based films have been coming out slowly with the scattered releases
                    of Leopard Man, Black Angel and Rear Window. The Window would be
                    most welcome as would a release of Phantom Lady.
                    >
                    > At least John Dickson Carr fans can feel a bit happy, as the film
                    Dangerous Crossing is being released on DVD March 11th. This, as
                    most know, is based on his famous radio play, Cabin B-13. I've never
                    seen the film and I am looking forward to it.
                    >
                    > And for private detective fans, Season 1 (volume 1) of Burke's Law
                    with Gene Barry is coming out at the end of April, and Mannix season
                    1, with Mike Conners is scheduled for this summer. Some sources say
                    early June though no confirmation has been set as yet. So the
                    mystery-private detective series are starting to come out. You'll
                    really hear a shout of joy from me when Cannon and Harry-O are
                    announced. Those were two of my favorites!
                    >
                    > Richard
                    >
                    >
                    > To: GAdetection@...: finsbry@...: Mon, 11 Feb 2008 18:20:16 -
                    0500Subject: Re: [GAdetection] TCM Crime Dramas (February 12-18)
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > In a message dated 2/8/08 12:04:52 PM, miketooney49@... writes:>
                    6:30 AM--"Window, The" (1949)> A boy who always lies witnesses a
                    murder but can't get> anyone but the killer to believe him.> Cast:
                    Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy.> Dir: Ted Tetzlaff. BW-
                    74 mins, TV-G, CC> --Aesop gets an update via Cornell Woolrich; great
                    premise> for a crime drama.> I saw this film as a kid--on the 5
                    o'clock movie before dinner back in the early 60s. It scared the you
                    know what out of me, and I remembered it forever. When I saw it in
                    the store for rental, I grabbed it. It still can send chills up my
                    spine-what kid doesn't fear not being believed? It isn't available in
                    DVD-but I bought a tape of it recently.I never knew my fav author of
                    all time wrote the short story it was based on. Go figure.Thanks
                    again for the list.Diane Plumley**************The year's hottest
                    artists on the red carpet at the Grammy Awards. Go to AOL Music.
                    (http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)[Non-text
                    portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    >
                  • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
                    Wasn t there a Alfred Hitchcock Presents story, starring Patricia Hitchcock herself, where she and her mother are in Paris, say about 1910 or so, and Patricia
                    Message 9 of 18 , Feb 13, 2008
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                      Wasn't there a Alfred Hitchcock Presents story, starring Patricia Hitchcock herself, where she and her mother are in Paris, say about 1910 or so, and Patricia goes out on an errand and comes back and the mother has disappeared? All the people in the hotel swear that they don't know her or the mother and then when Patricia goes to the room where she and the mother was staying she finds the room completely changed. Is this based on a Dickson Carr story? I don't think it is, but it sure sounds like one that he would have done. I think the episode is in the first season, if I remember correctly. Usually Alfred Hitchcock Presents filmed previously published short works. I know that there is a very good adaptation of a Dorothy Sayers story from the first season as well, involving a husband who slowly begins to suspect that his wife is poisoning him. It is a good one!

                      Well, I'll take my chances on Dangerous Crossing. It is a part of the Fox Noir series and they are very collectable and watchable.

                      All my best-

                      Richard


                      To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.comFrom: monescu4@...: Wed, 13 Feb 2008 00:57:52 +0000Subject: [GAdetection] Re: The Window and Others




                      I'm afraid you might be a bit disappointed in DANGEROUS CROSSING. Although the film is not without merit, they somehow gum up the last few minutes of the film, not making clear what I believe is the cleverest aspect of the plot (why a crewmember-- who is not lying-- claims that he only saw one passenger go up the gangplank). Dickson Carr was able to clear that up in one line of a short radio play, but the screenwriter somehow couldn't fit it in to a screenplay of twice the length. Much more satisfying is the 1950 film SO LONG AT THE FAIR, based on the old Paris Exposition disappearance story (and of which Carr's story was a clever variation).--- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, RICHARD LIEDHOLM <jandrliedholm@...> wrote:>> > I'm so glad to read that you loved The Window. It is a film I've cherished for years as well, and while it may not stand quite as tall as Hitchcock's masterpiece Rear Window, it is a very well made, suspenseful film. Bobby Driscoll is very good as the young boy, well deserving the praise (and Oscar) that he received. The Woolrich-based films have been coming out slowly with the scattered releases of Leopard Man, Black Angel and Rear Window. The Window would be most welcome as would a release of Phantom Lady.> > At least John Dickson Carr fans can feel a bit happy, as the film Dangerous Crossing is being released on DVD March 11th. This, as most know, is based on his famous radio play, Cabin B-13. I've never seen the film and I am looking forward to it.> > And for private detective fans, Season 1 (volume 1) of Burke's Law with Gene Barry is coming out at the end of April, and Mannix season 1, with Mike Conners is scheduled for this summer. Some sources say early June though no confirmation has been set as yet. So the mystery-private detective series are starting to come out. You'll really hear a shout of joy from me when Cannon and Harry-O are announced. Those were two of my favorites!> > Richard> > > To: GAdetection@...: finsbry@...: Mon, 11 Feb 2008 18:20:16 -0500Subject: Re: [GAdetection] TCM Crime Dramas (February 12-18)> > > > > In a message dated 2/8/08 12:04:52 PM, miketooney49@... writes:> 6:30 AM--"Window, The" (1949)> A boy who always lies witnesses a murder but can't get> anyone but the killer to believe him.> Cast: Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy.> Dir: Ted Tetzlaff. BW-74 mins, TV-G, CC> --Aesop gets an update via Cornell Woolrich; great premise> for a crime drama.> I saw this film as a kid--on the 5 o'clock movie before dinner back in the early 60s. It scared the you know what out of me, and I remembered it forever. When I saw it in the store for rental, I grabbed it. It still can send chills up my spine-what kid doesn't fear not being believed? It isn't available in DVD-but I bought a tape of it recently.I never knew my fav author of all time wrote the short story it was based on. Go figure.Thanks again for the list.Diane Plumley**************The year's hottest artists on the red carpet at the Grammy Awards. Go to AOL Music.(http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)[Non-text portions of this message have been removed] > > > > > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]>







                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • monescu4
                      The Alfred Hitchcock Presents story (titled Into Thin Air [aka The Vanishing Lady] ), like SO LONG AT THE FAIR, was based on the Paris Exposition urban
                      Message 10 of 18 , Feb 13, 2008
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                        The Alfred Hitchcock Presents story (titled "Into Thin Air [aka The
                        Vanishing Lady]"), like SO LONG AT THE FAIR, was based on the Paris
                        Exposition "urban legend" (though the original story for each was
                        credited to different people... in the Hitchcock case, it was none
                        other than the man who came to dinner, Alexander Woollcott!).
                        Another movie, THE MIDNIGHT WARNING (1932) is based on the same
                        legend, and shares with them the same solution.

                        DANGEROUS CROSSING, on the other hand, is based on Carr's radio
                        play "Cabin B-13," and offers an entirely different solution to the
                        same puzzle. Indeed, the solution to the Paris Exposition story is
                        discussed early in the proceedings of "Cabin B-13" (much as the "ABC
                        Murders" theory is discussed at one point in Queen's "Cat of Many
                        Tales"). Carr's story was also remade as a TV-movie TREACHEROUS
                        CROSSING. Though I consider Carr's solution more ingenious than the
                        Paris Exposition legend, neither filmed version of his story is as
                        good as SO LONG AT THE FAIR.

                        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, RICHARD LIEDHOLM
                        <jandrliedholm@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Wasn't there a Alfred Hitchcock Presents story, starring Patricia
                        Hitchcock herself, where she and her mother are in Paris, say about
                        1910 or so, and Patricia goes out on an errand and comes back and the
                        mother has disappeared? All the people in the hotel swear that they
                        don't know her or the mother and then when Patricia goes to the room
                        where she and the mother was staying she finds the room completely
                        changed. Is this based on a Dickson Carr story? I don't think it
                        is, but it sure sounds like one that he would have done. I think the
                        episode is in the first season, if I remember correctly. Usually
                        Alfred Hitchcock Presents filmed previously published short works. I
                        know that there is a very good adaptation of a Dorothy Sayers story
                        from the first season as well, involving a husband who slowly begins
                        to suspect that his wife is poisoning him. It is a good one!
                        >
                        > Well, I'll take my chances on Dangerous Crossing. It is a part of
                        the Fox Noir series and they are very collectable and watchable.
                        >
                        > All my best-
                        >
                        > Richard
                        >
                        >
                        > To: GAdetection@...: monescu4@...: Wed, 13 Feb 2008 00:57:52
                        +0000Subject: [GAdetection] Re: The Window and Others
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > I'm afraid you might be a bit disappointed in DANGEROUS CROSSING.
                        Although the film is not without merit, they somehow gum up the last
                        few minutes of the film, not making clear what I believe is the
                        cleverest aspect of the plot (why a crewmember-- who is not lying--
                        claims that he only saw one passenger go up the gangplank). Dickson
                        Carr was able to clear that up in one line of a short radio play, but
                        the screenwriter somehow couldn't fit it in to a screenplay of twice
                        the length. Much more satisfying is the 1950 film SO LONG AT THE
                        FAIR, based on the old Paris Exposition disappearance story (and of
                        which Carr's story was a clever variation).--- In
                        GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, RICHARD LIEDHOLM <jandrliedholm@>
                        wrote:>> > I'm so glad to read that you loved The Window. It is a
                        film I've cherished for years as well, and while it may not stand
                        quite as tall as Hitchcock's masterpiece Rear Window, it is a very
                        well made, suspenseful film. Bobby Driscoll is very good as the young
                        boy, well deserving the praise (and Oscar) that he received. The
                        Woolrich-based films have been coming out slowly with the scattered
                        releases of Leopard Man, Black Angel and Rear Window. The Window
                        would be most welcome as would a release of Phantom Lady.> > At least
                        John Dickson Carr fans can feel a bit happy, as the film Dangerous
                        Crossing is being released on DVD March 11th. This, as most know, is
                        based on his famous radio play, Cabin B-13. I've never seen the film
                        and I am looking forward to it.> > And for private detective fans,
                        Season 1 (volume 1) of Burke's Law with Gene Barry is coming out at
                        the end of April, and Mannix season 1, with Mike Conners is scheduled
                        for this summer. Some sources say early June though no confirmation
                        has been set as yet. So the mystery-private detective series are
                        starting to come out. You'll really hear a shout of joy from me when
                        Cannon and Harry-O are announced. Those were two of my favorites!> >
                        Richard> > > To: GAdetection@: finsbry@: Mon, 11 Feb 2008 18:20:16 -
                        0500Subject: Re: [GAdetection] TCM Crime Dramas (February 12-18)> > >
                        > > In a message dated 2/8/08 12:04:52 PM, miketooney49@ writes:>
                        6:30 AM--"Window, The" (1949)> A boy who always lies witnesses a
                        murder but can't get> anyone but the killer to believe him.> Cast:
                        Bobby Driscoll, Barbara Hale, Arthur Kennedy.> Dir: Ted Tetzlaff. BW-
                        74 mins, TV-G, CC> --Aesop gets an update via Cornell Woolrich; great
                        premise> for a crime drama.> I saw this film as a kid--on the 5
                        o'clock movie before dinner back in the early 60s. It scared the you
                        know what out of me, and I remembered it forever. When I saw it in
                        the store for rental, I grabbed it. It still can send chills up my
                        spine-what kid doesn't fear not being believed? It isn't available in
                        DVD-but I bought a tape of it recently.I never knew my fav author of
                        all time wrote the short story it was based on. Go figure.Thanks
                        again for the list.Diane Plumley**************The year's hottest
                        artists on the red carpet at the Grammy Awards. Go to AOL Music.
                        (http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)[Non-text
                        portions of this message have been removed] > > > > > > > > [Non-text
                        portions of this message have been removed]>
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • finsbry@aol.com
                        ... I enjoyed Phantom Lady, but was disappointed to have the villain so obvious from the beginning. I love The Leopard Man--even though I couldn t understand
                        Message 11 of 18 , Feb 14, 2008
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                          In a message dated 2/12/08 10:21:55 AM, jandrliedholm@... writes:


                          > The Woolrich-based films have been coming out slowly with the scattered
                          > releases of Leopard Man, Black Angel and Rear Window. The Window would be most
                          > welcome as would a release of Phantom Lady.
                          >

                          I enjoyed Phantom Lady, but was disappointed to have the villain so obvious
                          from the beginning.

                          I love The Leopard Man--even though I couldn't understand why they were using
                          a leopard when I knew it was a black panther--until someone pointed out that
                          a black panther is a leopard without spots, LOL. The young girl screaming to
                          be let in still makes my skin crawl. I think The Black Alibi is the creepiest
                          of all the Woolrich I've read.

                          No Man of Her Own based on I Married a Dead Man is quite good, even if they
                          needed to have a definite conclusion for the audience.

                          I wish someone had filmed Rendezvous in Black, probably my favorite book of
                          all time including my favorite phrase "the sky was rashy with stars."

                          Diane Plumley

                          I own Black Angel, but haven't viewed it yet.


                          **************
                          The year's hottest
                          artists on the red carpet at the Grammy Awards. Go to AOL Music.

                          (http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)


                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • lux2lane
                          ... I wish someone had filmed Rendezvous in Black, probably my favorite book of all time Be careful what you wish for, you may receive it! According the
                          Message 12 of 18 , Feb 15, 2008
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                            --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, finsbry@... wrote:

                            "I wish someone had filmed Rendezvous in Black, probably my favorite
                            book of all time"

                            Be careful what you wish for, you may receive it! According the New
                            York Times, the director John Woo is setting up just such a film.
                          • Tony Medawar
                            Can anyone recall the name of a film where a small boy is looking out of a window - there is a shot and his nurse or mother, standing behind him, is killed?
                            Message 13 of 18 , Feb 15, 2008
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                              Can anyone recall the name of a film where a small boy is looking out of a window - there is a shot and his nurse or mother, standing behind him, is killed? Black and white and from the 40s I think? Any ideas?

                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: finsbry@...
                              To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
                              Sent: Thursday, February 14, 2008 6:32 PM
                              Subject: Re: [GAdetection] The Window and Others



                              In a message dated 2/12/08 10:21:55 AM, jandrliedholm@... writes:

                              > The Woolrich-based films have been coming out slowly with the scattered
                              > releases of Leopard Man, Black Angel and Rear Window. The Window would be most
                              > welcome as would a release of Phantom Lady.
                              >

                              I enjoyed Phantom Lady, but was disappointed to have the villain so obvious
                              from the beginning.

                              I love The Leopard Man--even though I couldn't understand why they were using
                              a leopard when I knew it was a black panther--until someone pointed out that
                              a black panther is a leopard without spots, LOL. The young girl screaming to
                              be let in still makes my skin crawl. I think The Black Alibi is the creepiest
                              of all the Woolrich I've read.

                              No Man of Her Own based on I Married a Dead Man is quite good, even if they
                              needed to have a definite conclusion for the audience.

                              I wish someone had filmed Rendezvous in Black, probably my favorite book of
                              all time including my favorite phrase "the sky was rashy with stars."

                              Diane Plumley

                              I own Black Angel, but haven't viewed it yet.

                              **************
                              The year's hottest
                              artists on the red carpet at the Grammy Awards. Go to AOL Music.

                              (http://music.aol.com/grammys?NCID=aolcmp00300000002565)

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                            • Carole Shmurak
                              Very similar in plot to The Window is Shadow on the Wall (1950) in which a young girl witnesses her mother s murder. It starred Ann Sothern, Zachary Scott,
                              Message 14 of 18 , Feb 16, 2008
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                                Very similar in plot to The Window is Shadow on the Wall (1950) in which a
                                young girl witnesses her mother's murder. It starred Ann Sothern, Zachary
                                Scott, Gigi Perreau as the girl and Nancy Davis (later Reagan) as her
                                doctor, and it gave me nightmares for at least a year when I was five or
                                six. It's been on TCM a couple of times. Here's the IMDb synopsis:

                                Angered that her sister Celia has stolen her fiance, Dell Faring kills her
                                and allows Celia's husband David, knocked out in an argument with Celia, to
                                take the blame and end up on death row. Later Dell, finding out that David's
                                young daughter Susan was witness to the crime and is undergoing psychiatric
                                treatment, plans to eliminate her before her memory returns.

                                Carole Shmurak
                              • Christine
                                Is the shadow referred to in the title shaped like an Indian? Christy Britain If once a man indulges himself in murder, very soon he comes to think little of
                                Message 15 of 18 , Feb 16, 2008
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                                  Is the shadow referred to in the title shaped like an Indian?


                                  Christy Britain

                                  "If once a man indulges himself in murder, very
                                  soon he comes to think little of robbing; and
                                  from robbing he comes next to Sabbath-breaking,
                                  and from that to incivility and procrastination. "













                                  ---------------------------------
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                                • Carole Shmurak
                                  Christy Britain wrote, Is the shadow referred to in the title shaped like an Indian? Yes, that s the one. A truly frightening movie for a child to see. I m
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Feb 17, 2008
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                                    Christy Britain wrote,
                                    Is the shadow referred to in the title shaped like an Indian?

                                    Yes, that's the one. A truly frightening movie for a child to see. I'm
                                    pretty sure I saw it as the second film on a double bill at a Saturday
                                    matinee for kids. (Someone had bad judgment.)

                                    Carole Shmurak
                                  • Barry Ergang
                                    ... I watched Dangerous Crossing on DVD this afternoon. I enjoyed it for the most part, though Jeanne Crain strained credulity with some breathless
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Mar 26, 2008
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                                      --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "monescu4" <monescu4@...> wrote:
                                      > I'm afraid you might be a bit disappointed in DANGEROUS CROSSING.
                                      > Although the film is not without merit, they somehow gum up the last
                                      > few minutes of the film, not making clear what I believe is the
                                      > cleverest aspect of the plot (why a crewmember-- who is not lying--
                                      > claims that he only saw one passenger go up the gangplank). Dickson
                                      > Carr was able to clear that up in one line of a short radio play, but
                                      > the screenwriter somehow couldn't fit it in to a screenplay of twice
                                      > the length.

                                      I watched "Dangerous Crossing" on DVD this afternoon. I enjoyed it for
                                      the most part, though Jeanne Crain strained credulity with some
                                      breathless over-emoting in a couple of scenes, and in spite of an
                                      annoyingly overdone foghorn effect.

                                      Afterward I glanced through "Cabin B-13," which I hadn't read in a
                                      long time, and noted a few differences that favor the original radio
                                      play. One of these is the fact that cabin B-13 doesn't exist, whereas
                                      cabins B-16 and B-18 do in the film. The other is the explanation
                                      Monescu4 mentions above. But in the film, the truthful crew member
                                      doesn't *see* both passengers ascend the gangplank at the same time.

                                      The special features portion of the DVD includes several mentions of
                                      John Dickson Carr, a few of which are in reviews of the film.
                                    • RICHARD LIEDHOLM
                                      Barry- My copy of Dangerous Crossing hasn t arrived yet and I plan on watching it in between a ever-tightening schedule. Over-emoting could be the curse of B
                                      Message 18 of 18 , Mar 27, 2008
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                                        Barry- My copy of Dangerous Crossing hasn't arrived yet and I plan on watching it in between a ever-tightening schedule.

                                        Over-emoting could be the curse of 'B' movies of the 30s and 40s (and 50s) as well. It is hard not to roll one's eyes when watching a film directed by Cecil B DeMille, since he directed his films as if they were silents. Just watch some of the scenes in The Ten Commandments and you'll see what I mean. But I still love his movies regardless.

                                        I love the Fox noir film series, of which Dangerous Crossing is a part of, and I am excited to see it, warts and all.

                                        All this is a round about way to get to my question: Dangerous Crossing is based on the classic radio play by John Dickson Carr. This we all know. Would it be possible to re-film the story with a modern setting and still retain the magic of Carr's work? Some mysteries just cannot be transported into the future (such as the ill conceived modern version of Murder on the Orient Express). Could Carr's story work on a modern cruise ship? It would be an interesting experiment...

                                        Richard


                                        To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.comFrom: Barry_Ergang@...: Wed, 26 Mar 2008 21:20:41 +0000Subject: [GAdetection] "Dangerous Crossing"




                                        --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "monescu4" <monescu4@...> wrote:> I'm afraid you might be a bit disappointed in DANGEROUS CROSSING. > Although the film is not without merit, they somehow gum up the last > few minutes of the film, not making clear what I believe is the > cleverest aspect of the plot (why a crewmember-- who is not lying-- > claims that he only saw one passenger go up the gangplank). Dickson > Carr was able to clear that up in one line of a short radio play, but > the screenwriter somehow couldn't fit it in to a screenplay of twice > the length. I watched "Dangerous Crossing" on DVD this afternoon. I enjoyed it forthe most part, though Jeanne Crain strained credulity with somebreathless over-emoting in a couple of scenes, and in spite of an annoyingly overdone foghorn effect. Afterward I glanced through "Cabin B-13," which I hadn't read in along time, and noted a few differences that favor the original radioplay. One of these is the fact that cabin B-13 doesn't exist, whereascabins B-16 and B-18 do in the film. The other is the explanationMonescu4 mentions above. But in the film, the truthful crew memberdoesn't *see* both passengers ascend the gangplank at the same time. The special features portion of the DVD includes several mentions ofJohn Dickson Carr, a few of which are in reviews of the film.







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