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Re: Draft Wikipedia article: Locked Room Mystery

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  • pugmire1
    Jon, Actually, it s available on this site as a File: right above your own WWII list! John ... text? ... have
    Message 1 of 7 , Sep 1, 2006
      Jon,
      Actually, it's available on this site as a File: right above your
      own WWII list!

      John
      --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Jon Jermey <jonjermey@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi John,
      >
      > Attachments don't come through - do you want to let us see it as
      text?
      >
      > Thanks,
      >
      > Jon.
      >
      > pugmire1 wrote:
      > > I have taken the liberty of preparing an update to the current
      > > Wikipedia article on the Locked Room Mystery, a draft of which I
      have
      > > uploaded as a file. Comments would be really welcome.
      > >
      > > John
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
    • Jon Jermey
      John, It looks pretty good to me. I would add the authors of the books and stories you cite on pages 2 and 3, particularly as some of them have their own
      Message 2 of 7 , Sep 1, 2006
        John,

        It looks pretty good to me. I would add the authors of the books and
        stories you cite on pages 2 and 3, particularly as some of them have
        their own Wikipedia articles. I'd spell out the words 'seven' and 'nine'
        instead of using numerals, but that's just me. And I would love to see
        Phillpotts' Grey Room in there as an example of how NOT to do it!

        Why not post it to the list as text? It will probably get a wider
        circulation that way.

        Jon.

        BTW, I know I wrote a review of The Grey Room but I can't find it in the
        archives or on the Wiki - anyone kept a copy by any chance?

        pugmire1 wrote:
        > Jon,
        > Actually, it's available on this site as a File: right above your
        > own WWII list!
        >
        > John
        > --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, Jon Jermey <jonjermey@...> wrote:
        >> Hi John,
        >>
        >> Attachments don't come through - do you want to let us see it as
        > text?
        >> Thanks,
        >>
        >> Jon.
        >>
        >> pugmire1 wrote:
        >>> I have taken the liberty of preparing an update to the current
        >>> Wikipedia article on the Locked Room Mystery, a draft of which I
        > have
        >>> uploaded as a file. Comments would be really welcome.
        >>>
        >>> John
        >>>
      • MG4273@aol.com
        John, This looks like a VERY Good article on Locked Rooms. Here s a free paragraph I just wrote - you might add it (as Jimmy Durante said, Everyone wants to
        Message 3 of 7 , Sep 1, 2006
          John,

          This looks like a VERY Good article on Locked Rooms.
          Here's a free paragraph I just wrote - you might add it (as Jimmy Durante
          said, "Everyone wants to get in the act!"):

          In the first two thirds of the 20th Century, impossible crimes were mainly
          solved by genius amateur sleuths, who solved puzzling mysteries through sheer
          reasoning and brain power. Such creators of famous amateur detectives as Jacques
          Futrelle, Thomas and Mary Hanshew, G.K. Chesterton, Carolyn Wells, Agatha
          Christie, John Dickson Carr, Ellery Queen, C. Daly King, Clayton Rawson and
          Joseph Cummings turned out impossible crimes in huge quantities. Other kinds of
          sleuths tended to avoid the impossible crime: private eyes, police who solved
          crimes through police routine, medical and scientific detectives, and the
          courageous heroines who plunged into mystery chronicled by Mary Roberts Rinehart and
          her followers. One can find exceptions: Nigel Morland and Anthony Wynne, who
          often wrote science based detective stories, each created many impossible
          mysteries; and since the 1970�s, Bill Pronzini�s Nameless private eye has solved
          many a locked room puzzle. Some pulp magazine writers also created many
          impossible crimes, notably Fredric Brown, Cornell Woolrich and Paul Chadwick -
          although these writers tended to avoid the private eyes that many readers today
          associate with pulp fiction. Still, even today, many of the big producers of
          impossible crimes, such as Edward D. Hoch and Paul Halter, still feature genius
          amateur detectives who use pure brain power to solve their cases.

          A recount: Edward D. Hoch has written at least 115 impossibles, maybe 120 or
          more. John Dickson Carr published 100, and there are some unpublished radio
          plays by him. Still, it looks like Hoch has edged ahead, to be the number one
          most prolific creator of impossible crimes. The article should mention this.
          References to major Hoch impossible collections, such as "The Velvet Touch" and
          "More Things Impossible, The Second Casebook of Dr. Sam Hawthorne" seem in
          order - they are landmarks in the genre.
          Did you include Hake Talbot and Israel Zangwill? And Arthur Porges - the
          number three most prolific writer?

          All in all, this is a very good article!

          Mike Grost
        • MG4273@aol.com
          Erratum: My last post spelled Joseph Commings last name wrong. My apologies, Mike Grost
          Message 4 of 7 , Sep 2, 2006
            Erratum: My last post spelled Joseph Commings last name wrong.
            My apologies,

            Mike Grost
          • pugmire1
            Mike, Your remarks are much appreciated and I ll be happy to take up your offer to incorporate your astute observations into the finished article. John ...
            Message 5 of 7 , Sep 2, 2006
              Mike,
              Your remarks are much appreciated and I'll be happy to take up
              your offer to incorporate your astute observations into the finished
              article.

              John
              --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, MG4273@... wrote:
              >
              > John,
              >
              > This looks like a VERY Good article on Locked Rooms.
              > Here's a free paragraph I just wrote - you might add it (as Jimmy
              Durante
              > said, "Everyone wants to get in the act!"):
              >
              > In the first two thirds of the 20th Century, impossible crimes were
              mainly
              > solved by genius amateur sleuths, who solved puzzling mysteries
              through sheer
              > reasoning and brain power. Such creators of famous amateur
              detectives as Jacques
              > Futrelle, Thomas and Mary Hanshew, G.K. Chesterton, Carolyn Wells,
              Agatha
              > Christie, John Dickson Carr, Ellery Queen, C. Daly King, Clayton
              Rawson and
              > Joseph Cummings turned out impossible crimes in huge quantities.
              Other kinds of
              > sleuths tended to avoid the impossible crime: private eyes, police
              who solved
              > crimes through police routine, medical and scientific detectives,
              and the
              > courageous heroines who plunged into mystery chronicled by Mary
              Roberts Rinehart and
              > her followers. One can find exceptions: Nigel Morland and Anthony
              Wynne, who
              > often wrote science based detective stories, each created many
              impossible
              > mysteries; and since the 1970's, Bill Pronzini's Nameless private
              eye has solved
              > many a locked room puzzle. Some pulp magazine writers also created
              many
              > impossible crimes, notably Fredric Brown, Cornell Woolrich and Paul
              Chadwick -
              > although these writers tended to avoid the private eyes that many
              readers today
              > associate with pulp fiction. Still, even today, many of the big
              producers of
              > impossible crimes, such as Edward D. Hoch and Paul Halter, still
              feature genius
              > amateur detectives who use pure brain power to solve their cases.
              >
              > A recount: Edward D. Hoch has written at least 115 impossibles,
              maybe 120 or
              > more. John Dickson Carr published 100, and there are some
              unpublished radio
              > plays by him. Still, it looks like Hoch has edged ahead, to be the
              number one
              > most prolific creator of impossible crimes. The article should
              mention this.
              > References to major Hoch impossible collections, such as "The
              Velvet Touch" and
              > "More Things Impossible, The Second Casebook of Dr. Sam Hawthorne"
              seem in
              > order - they are landmarks in the genre.
              > Did you include Hake Talbot and Israel Zangwill? And Arthur Porges -
              the
              > number three most prolific writer?
              >
              > All in all, this is a very good article!
              >
              > Mike Grost
              >
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