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Re: New Author and Review

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  • Allen J Hubin
    Re Ronaldo s review of Paul Trent s Quayle of the Yard : Paul Trent was, I believe, the pseudonym of Edward Platt, 1872- , not of Eugene Robert Platt. And
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 16, 2006
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      Re Ronaldo's review of Paul Trent's "Quayle of the Yard":

      Paul Trent was, I believe, the pseudonym of Edward Platt, 1872- ,
      not of Eugene Robert Platt. And although I list dozens of "Trent"
      books in my bibliography, most with dashes to indicate marginal
      or unproved criminous content, these (in addition to those listed by
      Ronaldo) appear to be criminous:

      The Air Bandits (1935)
      The Blackguard (1923)
      The Blackmailer (1914)
      The Crooked Samaritan (1933)
      The Master of the Skies (1920)
      Mr. Justice Philbank (1934)
      A Modern Portia (1938)
      Nesbit's Compact (1915)
      Private and Confidential (1940)
      Red Mirage (1937)
      Shattered (1934)

      If anyone can add to these lists (or provide evidence of non-criminous
      nature of any of the above), I'd be delighted to hear.

      And I'd like to know if the setting of "Quayle of the Yard" is London or
      another major English city, or is a rural/village setting.

      Allen J. (Al) Hubin
    • luis molina
      I HAVE NEVER READ THE STORIES OF MAX CARRADOS AND MARTIN HEWITT...WICH SHOULD START WITH? __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!?
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 18, 2006
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        I HAVE NEVER READ THE STORIES OF MAX CARRADOS AND
        MARTIN HEWITT...WICH SHOULD START WITH?



        __________________________________________________
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      • Ronaldo
        ... You re absolutely right, I misread the information as they were next to each other on a list of author pseudonyms -:) ... Them main setting is rural, which
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 18, 2006
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          On 16 Jul 2006, at 18:45, Allen J Hubin wrote:

          > Re Ronaldo's review of Paul Trent's "Quayle of the Yard":
          >
          > Paul Trent was, I believe, the pseudonym of Edward Platt, 1872- ,
          > not of Eugene Robert Platt.

          You're absolutely right, I misread the information as they were next to
          each other on a list of author pseudonyms -:)



          > And although I list dozens of "Trent"
          > books in my bibliography, most with dashes to indicate marginal
          > or unproved criminous content, these (in addition to those listed by
          > Ronaldo) appear to be criminous:
          >
          > The Air Bandits (1935)
          > The Blackguard (1923)
          > The Blackmailer (1914)
          > The Crooked Samaritan (1933)
          > The Master of the Skies (1920)
          > Mr. Justice Philbank (1934)
          > A Modern Portia (1938)
          > Nesbit's Compact (1915)
          > Private and Confidential (1940)
          > Red Mirage (1937)
          > Shattered (1934)
          >
          > If anyone can add to these lists (or provide evidence of non-criminous
          > nature of any of the above), I'd be delighted to hear.
          >
          > And I'd like to know if the setting of "Quayle of the Yard" is London
          > or
          > another major English city, or is a rural/village setting.

          Them main setting is rural, which some scenes later in London. The last
          quarter or so is set during a journey to Amsterdam, so boat, train etc.


          R E Faust



          >
          > Allen J. (Al) Hubin
          >
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • MG4273@aol.com
          Favorite Arthur Morrison short tales (the very best ones marked with *): Martin Hewitt, Investigator (1893) · The Lenton Croft Robberies * · The Case of Mr.
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 18, 2006
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            Favorite Arthur Morrison short tales (the very best ones marked with *):

            Martin Hewitt, Investigator (1893)
            � The Lenton Croft Robberies *
            � The Case of Mr. Foggatt

            The Chronicles of Martin Hewitt (1894)
            � The Ivy Cottage Mystery
            � The Nicobar Bullion Case *
            � The Case of the Missing Hand
            � The Case of Laker, Absconded

            The Adventures of Martin Hewitt (1895)
            � The Case of Mr. Geldard's Elopement *
            � The Flitterbat Lancers
            Many of the above are in a 1970's Dover paperback, Best Martin Hewitt
            Detective Stories (if memory serves).

            I'm NOT a big Ernst Bramah fan. But the ones that seem best:
            Max Carrados
            � The Last Exploit of Harry the Actor (1913)
            � The Game Played in the Dark (1913) *

            The Eyes of Max Carrados (collected 1923)
            � Mystery of The Dish Of Poisoned Mushrooms
            � The Disappearance of Marie Severe

            Max Carrados Mysteries (collected 1927)
            � The Vanished Petition Crown *

            Mike Grost
          • Bob Schneider
            Luis, I slightly favor Hewitt over Carrados. Both are worth seeking out and reading though I suspect that Carrados might tire you more quickly than Hewitt.
            Message 5 of 6 , Jul 19, 2006
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              Luis,

              I slightly favor Hewitt over Carrados. Both are worth seeking out and
              reading though I suspect that Carrados might tire you more quickly
              than Hewitt.

              Bob

              --- In GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, luis molina <lrmolina47@...> wrote:
              >
              > I HAVE NEVER READ THE STORIES OF MAX CARRADOS AND
              > MARTIN HEWITT...WICH SHOULD START WITH?
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