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Re: [GAdetection] Simenon

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  • ogzrn
    I do, and much more than any golden age mystery. Of course a Maigret novel can t be compared to classic mysteries. ... [Non-text portions of this message have
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 5 11:10 AM
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      I do, and much more than any golden age mystery. Of course a Maigret novel
      can't be compared to classic mysteries.

      On 4/5/06, luis molina <lrmolina47@...> wrote:
      >
      > NO, I DO ENJOY THEM, AND I THINK A LOT OF US DO, BUT
      > NOT FOR THE MYSTERIES BUT FOR THE WAY THETY ARE
      > WRITTEN.
      >
      > --- Douglas Greene <dgreene@...> wrote:
      >
      > > Am I the only one on this list who enjoys Simenon's
      > > Maigret novels?
      > >
      > > Doug
      > >
      > > Douglas G. Greene
      > > Professor of History
      > > Old Dominion University
      > > Norfolk, VA 23529-0091
      > > Phone 757 683-3949
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > GAdetection@yahoo
      > >
      > > groups.com
      > >
      > >
      > > To
      > > 04/05/2006 08:59
      > > GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
      > > AM
      > > cc
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Subject
      > > Please respond to [GAdetection]
      > > Digest Number 1575
      > > GAdetection@yahoo
      > >
      > > groups.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > There are 6 messages in this issue.
      > >
      > > Topics in this digest:
      > >
      > > 1. Re: Georges Simenon
      > > From: "pugmire1" <pugmire1@...>
      > > 2. Re: Christie's Popularity
      > > From: aria376 <aria376@...>
      > > 3. Re: Christie
      > > From: "S. T. Karnick"
      > > <stkarnick@...>
      > > 4. Re: Christie's Popularity
      > > From: "vegetableduck"
      > > <cjevans@...>
      > > 5. Omissions from the Symons/Francis Quarles
      > > book
      > > From: Douglas Greene <dgreene@...>
      > > 6. Re: Christie's Popularity
      > > From: "Xavier Lechard"
      > > <lechardxavier@...>
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > >
      > > Message: 1
      > > Date: Tue, 04 Apr 2006 13:47:47 -0000
      > > From: "pugmire1" <pugmire1@...>
      > > Subject: Re: Georges Simenon
      > >
      > > You'll get no argument from me about your view of
      > > Simenon.
      > >
      > > It was he who led the movement away from
      > > detective-fiction towards
      > > fiction-about-detectives. He deliberately set out to
      > > challenge the
      > > GAD style of novel and in the process he allowed a
      > > lot of mediocre
      > > hacks (of which, IMHO, he was one) to flourish and
      > > prosper by writing
      > > about psychological mumbo-jumbo instead of
      > > contructing ingenious
      > > plots and puzzles.
      > >
      > > You can always spot a fiction-about-detectives
      > > novel. There's never a
      > > surprise about the guilty party: it's always
      > > 'society.'
      > >
      > > John P.
      > >
      > >
      > > GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Ritzner Von Jung"
      > > <ritznervonjung@...>
      > > wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Can someone please explain me why this guy is so
      > > highly regarded by
      > > both
      > > > critics and historians? As far as I'm concerned,
      > > he is way
      > > overrated: his
      > > > plots are perfunctory, his characterization is
      > > pedestrian (Maigret
      > > has to be
      > > > the most boring cop in all mystery fiction!) and
      > > his writing style
      > > makes
      > > > Edgar Rice Burroughs sound like Tennyson. So
      > > what's all the fuss
      > > about? Is
      > > > it because he is supposedly more "literary" than
      > > your average
      > > mystery
      > > > writer? Frankly I don't see why for the reasons
      > > stated above. I'd
      > > really
      > > > like to know what I'm missing here.
      > > >
      > > > R.V.J.
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > >
      > ________________________________________________________________________
      > >
      > > Message: 2
      > > Date: Tue, 4 Apr 2006 08:19:05 -0700 (PDT)
      > > From: aria376 <aria376@...>
      > > Subject: Re: Christie's Popularity
      > >
      > > Hello, Nick -
      > > I confess to -- or could be accused of -- reading
      > > all of Christie except
      > > those recent "novels" that some idiot has been
      > > publishing, really just her
      > > plays in different format (much as I suppose I'd
      > > have to do the same with
      > > Erle Stanley Gardner). And your comments will
      > > certainly get no argument
      > > from me. Other "studies," by the way, in comparing
      > > best-selling authors,
      > > include Miguel de Cervantes; still others put Arthur
      > > Conan Doyle above
      > > Shakespeare. I'm sure you know that. Studies, like
      > > statistics, can say
      > > anything of course that anyone wants them to.
      > > ;
      > > nick <nick@...> wrote:
      > > As promised a separate thread :).
      > >
      > > First some context. Christie sales are over 2
      > > billion -
      > > 1 billion in English, I billion in translations.
      > > While it is
      > > clear that these figures are estimates, what is
      > > unquestioned is
      > > that Christie is in a category of her own as far as
      > > sales
      > > are concerned. The two 'authors' who are said to
      > > exceed
      > > her are the Bible and Shakespeare. Such comparisons
      > > are probably silly as it would be hard to assess how
      > > many
      > > copies of these are bought to be read as opposed to
      > > being bought for devotional or educational reasons.
      > > All we can say is that Christie is a sui generis
      > > phenomenon
      > > in terms of sales (and I am making the, perhaps
      > > dangerous, equation of sales and popularity) as far
      > > as English writers are
      > > concerned.
      > >
      > > What is extraordinary about this is how little
      > > research has been done
      > > into the reasons behind it. I have seen some quite
      > > extraordinarily
      > > silly answers given and few serious ones. I
      > > certainly do not intend
      > > to suggest that I have any idea as to the key which
      > > would unlock
      > > what I think can be called the greatest Christie
      > > mystery.
      > >
      > > It is definitely not connected to any quality as a
      > > mystery writer compared
      > > to other mystery writers. However highly one rates,
      > > overrates or underrates
      > > Christie I do not think the comparison with other
      > > mystery writers could
      > >
      > === message truncated ===
      >
      >
      > __________________________________________________
      > Do You Yahoo!?
      > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Warren Malach
      Please include me among those who enjoy the Maigret novels. --Warren
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 5 9:28 PM
      • 0 Attachment
        Please include me among those who enjoy the Maigret novels. --Warren


        >From: ogzrn <oguzeren@...>
        >Reply-To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        >To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: Re: [GAdetection] Simenon
        >Date: Wed, 5 Apr 2006 21:10:41 +0300
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >I do, and much more than any golden age mystery. Of course a Maigret novel
        >
        >can't be compared to classic mysteries.
        >
        >
        >
        >On 4/5/06, luis molina <lrmolina47@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        >
        > > NO, I DO ENJOY THEM, AND I THINK A LOT OF US DO, BUT
        >
        > > NOT FOR THE MYSTERIES BUT FOR THE WAY THETY ARE
        >
        > > WRITTEN.
        >
        > >
        >
        > > --- Douglas Greene <dgreene@...> wrote:
        >
        > >
        >
        > > > Am I the only one on this list who enjoys Simenon's
        >
        > > > Maigret novels?
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > Doug
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > Douglas G. Greene
        >
        > > > Professor of History
        >
        > > > Old Dominion University
        >
        > > > Norfolk, VA 23529-0091
        >
        > > > Phone 757 683-3949
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >������������� GAdetection@yahoo
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >������������� groups.com
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >������������������� To
        >
        > > >������������� 04/05/2006 08:59
        >
        > > > GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > > >������������� AM
        >
        > > >������������������� cc
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >�������������� Subject
        >
        > > >������������� Please respond to�������� [GAdetection]
        >
        > > > Digest Number 1575
        >
        > > >������������� GAdetection@yahoo
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >���������������� groups.com
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > There are 6 messages in this issue.
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > Topics in this digest:
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >������ 1. Re: Georges Simenon
        >
        > > >����������� From: "pugmire1" <pugmire1@...>
        >
        > > >������ 2. Re: Christie's Popularity
        >
        > > >����������� From: aria376 <aria376@...>
        >
        > > >������ 3. Re: Christie
        >
        > > >����������� From: "S. T. Karnick"
        >
        > > > <stkarnick@...>
        >
        > > >������ 4. Re: Christie's Popularity
        >
        > > >����������� From: "vegetableduck"
        >
        > > > <cjevans@...>
        >
        > > >������ 5. Omissions from the Symons/Francis Quarles
        >
        > > > book
        >
        > > >����������� From: Douglas Greene <dgreene@...>
        >
        > > >������ 6. Re: Christie's Popularity
        >
        > > >����������� From: "Xavier Lechard"
        >
        > > > <lechardxavier@...>
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > Message: 1
        >
        > > >��� Date: Tue, 04 Apr 2006 13:47:47 -0000
        >
        > > >��� From: "pugmire1" <pugmire1@...>
        >
        > > > Subject: Re: Georges Simenon
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > You'll get no argument from me about your view of
        >
        > > > Simenon.
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > It was he who led the movement away from
        >
        > > > detective-fiction towards
        >
        > > > fiction-about-detectives. He deliberately set out to
        >
        > > > challenge the
        >
        > > > GAD style of novel and in the process he allowed a
        >
        > > > lot of mediocre
        >
        > > > hacks (of which, IMHO, he was one) to flourish and
        >
        > > > prosper by writing
        >
        > > > about psychological mumbo-jumbo instead of
        >
        > > > contructing ingenious
        >
        > > > plots and puzzles.
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > You can always spot a fiction-about-detectives
        >
        > > > novel. There's never a
        >
        > > > surprise about the guilty party: it's always
        >
        > > > 'society.'
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > John P.
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >� GAdetection@yahoogroups.com, "Ritzner Von Jung"
        >
        > > > <ritznervonjung@...>
        >
        > > > wrote:
        >
        > > > >
        >
        > > > > Can someone please explain me why this guy is so
        >
        > > > highly regarded by
        >
        > > > both
        >
        > > > > critics and historians? As far as I'm concerned,
        >
        > > > he is way
        >
        > > > overrated: his
        >
        > > > > plots are perfunctory, his characterization is
        >
        > > > pedestrian (Maigret
        >
        > > > has to be
        >
        > > > > the most boring cop in all mystery fiction!) and
        >
        > > > his writing style
        >
        > > > makes
        >
        > > > > Edgar Rice Burroughs sound like Tennyson. So
        >
        > > > what's all the fuss
        >
        > > > about? Is
        >
        > > > > it because he is supposedly more "literary" than
        >
        > > > your average
        >
        > > > mystery
        >
        > > > > writer? Frankly I don't see why for the reasons
        >
        > > > stated above. I'd
        >
        > > > really
        >
        > > > > like to know what I'm missing here.
        >
        > > > >
        >
        > > > > R.V.J.
        >
        > > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > ________________________________________________________________________
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > Message: 2
        >
        > > >��� Date: Tue, 4 Apr 2006 08:19:05 -0700 (PDT)
        >
        > > >��� From: aria376 <aria376@...>
        >
        > > > Subject: Re: Christie's Popularity
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > Hello, Nick -
        >
        > > >�� I confess to -- or could be accused of -- reading
        >
        > > > all of Christie except
        >
        > > > those recent "novels" that some idiot has been
        >
        > > > publishing, really just her
        >
        > > > plays in different format (much as I suppose I'd
        >
        > > > have to do the same with
        >
        > > > Erle Stanley Gardner).� And your comments will
        >
        > > > certainly get no argument
        >
        > > > from me.� Other "studies," by the way, in comparing
        >
        > > > best-selling authors,
        >
        > > > include Miguel de Cervantes; still others put Arthur
        >
        > > > Conan Doyle above
        >
        > > > Shakespeare.� I'm sure you know that.� Studies, like
        >
        > > > statistics, can say
        >
        > > > anything of course that anyone wants them to.
        >
        > > >�� ;
        >
        > > >�� nick <nick@...> wrote:
        >
        > > >�� As promised a separate thread :).
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > First some context. Christie sales are over 2
        >
        > > > billion -
        >
        > > > 1 billion in English, I billion in translations.
        >
        > > > While it is
        >
        > > > clear that these figures are estimates, what is
        >
        > > > unquestioned is
        >
        > > > that Christie is in a category of her own as far as
        >
        > > > sales
        >
        > > > are concerned. The two 'authors' who are said to
        >
        > > > exceed
        >
        > > > her are the Bible and Shakespeare. Such comparisons
        >
        > > > are probably silly as it would be hard to assess how
        >
        > > > many
        >
        > > > copies of these are bought to be read as opposed to
        >
        > > > being bought for devotional or educational reasons.
        >
        > > > All we can say is that Christie is a sui generis
        >
        > > > phenomenon
        >
        > > > in terms of sales (and I am making the, perhaps
        >
        > > > dangerous, equation of sales and popularity) as far
        >
        > > > as English writers are
        >
        > > > concerned.
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > What is extraordinary about this is how little
        >
        > > > research has been done
        >
        > > > into the reasons behind it. I have seen some quite
        >
        > > > extraordinarily
        >
        > > > silly answers given and few serious ones. I
        >
        > > > certainly do not intend
        >
        > > > to suggest that I have any idea as to the key which
        >
        > > > would unlock
        >
        > > > what I think can be called the greatest Christie
        >
        > > > mystery.
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > > It is definitely not connected to any quality as a
        >
        > > > mystery writer compared
        >
        > > > to other mystery writers. However highly one rates,
        >
        > > > overrates or underrates
        >
        > > > Christie I do not think the comparison with other
        >
        > > > mystery writers could
        >
        > > >
        >
        > > === message truncated ===
        >
        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        > > __________________________________________________
        >
        > > Do You Yahoo!?
        >
        > > Tired of spam?� Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
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        > >
        >
        > >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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      • Joop van den Berg
        Why are some people constantly thinking that someone is overrated, as if THAT means anything at all. I think there is NO one who gets overrated or underrated
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 7 11:38 PM
        • 0 Attachment
          Why are some people constantly thinking that someone is overrated, as if THAT means anything at all.
          I think there is NO one who gets overrated or underrated at all. The last is only possible when your work is not available everywhere so people simply don't get the chance to read your books. For example, in Indonesia, almost 95% of the books in the world are not allowed to enter for the most stupid reasons, a kiss, one bad word about Indonesia or whatever. That doesn't mean that you are underrated.

          Agatha Christie is not overrated, and Simenon is no overrated. it is simple that you and I and everybody else might have a different taste.
          Though I love the mistery writers of the so called Golden Age, I can't stan Ellery Queen for example. But that doesn't mean that I think he is overrated. it is as simple as food. You like fish and I like meat.

          Simenon's popularity is especially big in the countries like his birth country and neighbours. That means, France, Belgium and the Netherlands for example, loved the television series related to his books, and his books are quite loved.

          At the same time, I can become lyric about Miss marple, but have you ever wondered why? I mean, when I come to think of it, I think I wouldn't want to meet Miss marple even if someone would offer me a million. (Well, a million dollar, maybe...).

          She is one of the nosiest, stuborn, women I know, and she would be one of those people you would try to keep out of your house, cause she would probably place your lamps, plants and books somewhere else cause SHE would think it would look better over there.

          Still, I can't get enough of her, as long as it is in a book, a movie or on tv. But please, let anyone who the least looks like her, stay away from my door.

          So, before we get this complaining all the time of people/authors who are overrated : no one is overrated. Simenon is not, he is just not YOUR favorite.




          ---------------------------------
          Blab-away for as little as 1¢/min. Make PC-to-Phone Calls using Yahoo! Messenger with Voice.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Warren Malach
          My apologies: in my last post I meant Tey and Gladys Mitchell, not Griffith, were harder to read than the other Queens of GAD Mysteries. --Warren
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 8 12:45 AM
          • 0 Attachment
            My apologies: in my last post I meant Tey and Gladys Mitchell, not Griffith,
            were harder to read than the other Queens of GAD Mysteries. --Warren


            >From: Joop van den Berg <missmarple.inholland@...>
            >Reply-To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
            >To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
            >Subject: [GAdetection] overrated
            >Date: Fri, 7 Apr 2006 23:38:57 -0700 (PDT)
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >Why are some people constantly thinking that someone is overrated, as if
            >THAT means anything at all.
            >
            >� I think there is NO one who gets overrated or underrated at all. The last
            >is only possible when your work is not available everywhere so people
            >simply don't get the chance to read your books. For example, in Indonesia,
            >almost 95% of the books in the world are not allowed to enter for the most
            >stupid reasons, a kiss, one bad word about Indonesia or whatever. That
            >doesn't mean that you are underrated.
            >
            >��
            >
            >� Agatha Christie is not overrated, and Simenon is no overrated. it is
            >simple that you and I and everybody else might have a different taste.
            >
            >� Though I love the mistery writers of the so called Golden Age, I can't
            >stan Ellery Queen for example. But that doesn't mean that I think he is
            >overrated. it is as simple as food. You like fish and I like meat.
            >
            >��
            >
            >� Simenon's popularity is especially big in the countries like his birth
            >country and neighbours. That means, France, Belgium and the Netherlands for
            >example, loved the television series related to his books, and his books
            >are quite loved.
            >
            >��
            >
            >� At the same time, I can become lyric about Miss marple, but have you ever
            >wondered why? I mean, when I come to think of it, I think I wouldn't want
            >to meet Miss marple even if someone would offer me a million. (Well, a
            >million dollar, maybe...).
            >
            >��
            >
            >� She is one of the nosiest, stuborn, women I know, and she would be one of
            >those people you would try to keep out of your house, cause she would
            >probably place your lamps, plants and books somewhere else cause SHE would
            >think it would look better over there.
            >
            >��
            >
            >� Still, I can't get enough of her, as long as it is in a book, a movie or
            >on tv. But please, let anyone who the least looks like her, stay away from
            >my door.
            >
            >��
            >
            >� So, before we get this complaining all the time of people/authors who are
            >overrated : no one is overrated. Simenon is not, he is just not YOUR
            >favorite.
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >����� �����
            >
            >---------------------------------
            >
            >Blab-away for as little as 1�/min. Make� PC-to-Phone Calls using Yahoo!
            >Messenger with Voice.
            >
            >
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS
            >
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          • Nicholas Fuller
            I can t say that I ve ever had trouble reading Mitchell. That said, Sunset Over Soho was a slog the first time I read it (it s much better the second time
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 8 2:47 AM
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              I can't say that I've ever had trouble reading Mitchell. That said, Sunset Over Soho was a slog the first time I read it (it's much better the second time round) and I've known people have trouble with Laurels are Poison and Brazen Tongue. The very late ones are also written largely in dialogue, which works most of the time, but can get a bit Compton-Burnett at times. Ninety percent of the time, though, I find reading Mitchell an absolute joy. Her books are full of energy, good humour and a generous outlook on life; her characters are vivid and engaging; her ability to evoke a place or a mood unparallelled; and her plots always fascinating (and often hard to solve). She is, in my opinion, extremely under-rated; I would unhesitatingly call her my favourite detective writer (which will come as no surprise to anyone).

              Nick


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            • Warren Malach
              My assertion that Mitchell was hard for me to read was based exclusively upon my failed attempts to get into RISING OF THE MOON. I had no problems with
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 8 12:44 PM
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                My assertion that Mitchell was hard for me to read was based exclusively
                upon my failed attempts to "get into" RISING OF THE MOON. I had no problems
                with SPEEDY DEATH and the one or two other Mitchell mysteries I have read,
                but the one "problem" mystery left the strongest impression on me and caused
                me to include her with Tey, whom I DO find hard to read, apart from DAUGHTER
                OF TIME. --Warren


                >From: Nicholas Fuller <stoke_moran@...>
                >Reply-To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
                >To: GAdetection@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: RE: [GAdetection] overrated
                >Date: Sat, 8 Apr 2006 19:47:05 +1000 (EST)
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >I can't say that I've ever had trouble reading Mitchell.� That said, Sunset
                >Over Soho was a slog the first time I read it (it's much better the second
                >time round) and I've known people have trouble with Laurels are Poison and
                >Brazen Tongue.� The very late ones are also written largely in dialogue,
                >which works most of the time, but can get a bit Compton-Burnett at times.�
                >Ninety percent of the time, though, I find reading Mitchell an absolute
                >joy.� Her books are full of energy, good humour and a generous outlook on
                >life; her characters are vivid and engaging; her ability to evoke a place
                >or a mood unparallelled; and her plots always fascinating (and often hard
                >to solve).� She is, in my opinion, extremely under-rated; I would
                >unhesitatingly call her my favourite detective writer (which will come as
                >no surprise to anyone).
                >
                >��
                >
                >� Nick
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                >"a citizen of the Universe, and a gentleman to boot"
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              • Nicholas Fuller
                PIETR LE LETTON    (1931) B The first Maigret story.  Darker than some of the later Simenon stories, with more of a sordidly naturalistic edge—Fécamp,
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 18, 2009
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                  PIETR LE LETTON    (1931)
                  B
                  The first Maigret story.  Darker than some of the later Simenon stories, with more of a sordidly naturalistic edge—Fécamp, port in Normandy, in November rain and rough seas; Jewish ghettoes in Paris, and the Hotel Majestic.  Maigret involved with gangsters, and is wounded; his colleague, Brigadier Torrence, is murdered.  (Doesn’t he appear in later books?)  The plot is tangled and convoluted (the murders of Torrence and Mortimer-Levingston are incidental), but the central idea of ***Pietr being not the villain but the victim, killed and impersonated by his envious and subservient twin***, is excellent, succeeding both as plot and as characterisation.
                   
                   
                  LE CHARRETIER DE “LA PROVIDENCE”  (1931)
                  C
                  Not as good as Pietr-le-Letton—it’s 30 pages shorter, but feels much longer, because the pace is as sluggish as the canals on which the action takes place.  The murderer is the title character, who is a minor character until well towards the end.  The most interesting things are the mournful (and rather depressing) atmosphere of boating life, and the two lonely, miserable husbands of a weak and voluptuously life-loving woman.
                  Based on Simenon’s knowledge of canals and boats—he wrote the firs Maigrets while travelling around Europe on boats.


                  "A citizen of the universe, and a gentleman to boot."


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