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Re: Field repairs on Radiators

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  • sgtwal
    The U. S. Army had manuals for wheeled and tracked vehicles. The manual for field expedient, called improvised, repairs that I had listed a half dozen or so
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 2 7:10 AM
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       The U. S. Army had manuals for wheeled and tracked vehicles. The manual for field expedient, called improvised, repairs that I had listed a half dozen or so patches for radiators which included what I mentioned, also adding a raw egg to the radiator, loosening the radiator pressure cap to reduce pressure in the system, and the use of wooden plugs and rags for large holes. 
      Hope this helps.
       
       
      wayne
       
      ________________________
      1b. Re: Field repairs on radiators.
          Posted by: "Chris" wroblew@... wroblew705
          Date: Fri Feb 28, 2014 7:58 am ((PST))

      Thanks for that sgtwal

      Would that have been a US Army publication, what other temporary repairs or tricks does it mention? I've a British Army 1943 Improvised field repairs manual that says something similar including pouring in sawdust, pea flour or pea soup and kneading soap or chewing gum into small leaks including wooden plugs and cloth into larger holes. Does anyone have a clear up close picture of an M4A2 radiator? The images in my manual of the rad are not very detailed.

      Chris....
    • Chris
      Thanks for that Wayne Interesting how those tricks are still relevant today! Explains the images I ve seen of British and Polish M4A2 s in Italy with what
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 2 12:59 PM
      Thanks for that Wayne
       
      Interesting how those tricks are still relevant today! Explains the images I've seen of British and Polish M4A2's in Italy with what looks like lengths of track from a Universal or Lloyd carrier fixed across radiator vent just above the exhaust deflector (see attached image). Had always wondered as to their purpose, makes sense now. Obviously a crew improvisation as not all had this.
       
      Chris.......
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 02, 2014 8:10 AM
      Subject: [G104] Re: Field repairs on Radiators

       

       The U. S. Army had manuals for wheeled and tracked vehicles. The manual for field expedient, called improvised, repairs that I had listed a half dozen or so patches for radiators which included what I mentioned, also adding a raw egg to the radiator, loosening the radiator pressure cap to reduce pressure in the system, and the use of wooden plugs and rags for large holes. 
      Hope this helps.
       
       
      wayne
    • Joe DeMarco
      Hi Chris, Interesting the way they used spare tracks to try to protect the radiators on T-152545. It looks like a couple sand shield fronts were joined
      Message 3 of 6 , Mar 9 12:51 PM
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      Hi Chris,
       
      Interesting the way they used spare tracks to try to protect the radiators on T-152545.
       
      It looks like a couple sand shield fronts were joined together to make the stowage tub on the rear.
       
      The M3 type bogies in combination with the side appliqué plates is uncommon.
       
      T-152522 (Quizil-Rabat) can be seen with that combo, as well.
       
      I would assume the appliqué mod was done "in the field" in Italy or Africa.
       
      The M4A2 monument at Monte Casino was also retrofitted with the appliqué plates.
      Another part of that same mod was to cut away the perforated mesh around the turret basket.
      There is still mesh around the turret, so it would seem that they didn't bother with that step.
       
      Chris, do you have any "who, what, where, when" about the Firefly in the attached photo?
       
      Joe
       
       
       
       

      From: Chris
      Sent: Sunday, March 02, 2014 4:59 PM
      Subject: Re: [G104] Re: Field repairs on Radiators [1 Attachment]

      Thanks for that Wayne
       
      Interesting how those tricks are still relevant today! Explains the images I've seen of British and Polish M4A2's in Italy with what looks like lengths of track from a Universal or Lloyd carrier fixed across radiator vent just above the exhaust deflector (see attached image). Had always wondered as to their purpose, makes sense now. Obviously a crew improvisation as not all had this.
       
      Chris.......
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 02, 2014 8:10 AM
      Subject: [G104] Re: Field repairs on Radiators

       

       The U. S. Army had manuals for wheeled and tracked vehicles. The manual for field expedient, called improvised, repairs that I had listed a half dozen or so patches for radiators which included what I mentioned, also adding a raw egg to the radiator, loosening the radiator pressure cap to reduce pressure in the system, and the use of wooden plugs and rags for large holes. 
      Hope this helps.
       
       
      wayne
    • Chris
      Tank was named POWAB from No.2 Squadron,1st Platoon. Was platoon commander s tank 2nd Lt. Matykiewicz. Hit by anti-tank round or rocket & suffered internal
      Message 4 of 6 , Mar 9 1:33 PM
      Tank was named 'POWAB' from No.2 Squadron,1st Platoon. Was platoon commander's tank 2nd Lt. Matykiewicz.
      Hit by anti-tank round or rocket & suffered internal explosion. Happened while crossing Fossatone canal April 19,1945
      during fighting near Bologna. Driver was apparently rescued prior to internal explosion, whether he lived is unknown.
       
      Chris......
       
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 09, 2014 1:51 PM
      Subject: Re: [G104] Re: Field repairs on Radiators [1 Attachment]

       

      Hi Chris,
       
      Interesting the way they used spare tracks to try to protect the radiators on T-152545.
       
      It looks like a couple sand shield fronts were joined together to make the stowage tub on the rear.
       
      The M3 type bogies in combination with the side appliqué plates is uncommon.
       
      T-152522 (Quizil-Rabat) can be seen with that combo, as well.
       
      I would assume the appliqué mod was done "in the field" in Italy or Africa.
       
      The M4A2 monument at Monte Casino was also retrofitted with the appliqué plates.
      Another part of that same mod was to cut away the perforated mesh around the turret basket.
      There is still mesh around the turret, so it would seem that they didn't bother with that step.
       
      Chris, do you have any "who, what, where, when" about the Firefly in the attached photo?
       
      Joe
       
       
       
       

      From: Chris
      Sent: Sunday, March 02, 2014 4:59 PM
      Subject: Re: [G104] Re: Field repairs on Radiators [1 Attachment]

      Thanks for that Wayne
       
      Interesting how those tricks are still relevant today! Explains the images I've seen of British and Polish M4A2's in Italy with what looks like lengths of track from a Universal or Lloyd carrier fixed across radiator vent just above the exhaust deflector (see attached image). Had always wondered as to their purpose, makes sense now. Obviously a crew improvisation as not all had this.
       
      Chris.......
      ----- Original Message -----
      Sent: Sunday, March 02, 2014 8:10 AM
      Subject: [G104] Re: Field repairs on Radiators

       

       The U. S. Army had manuals for wheeled and tracked vehicles. The manual for field expedient, called improvised, repairs that I had listed a half dozen or so patches for radiators which included what I mentioned, also adding a raw egg to the radiator, loosening the radiator pressure cap to reduce pressure in the system, and the use of wooden plugs and rags for large holes. 
      Hope this helps.
       
       
      wayne

    • Chris
      My uncle took a couple of before and after photos of POWAB. Thought you might find them interesting. Chris.....
      Message 5 of 6 , Mar 9 1:46 PM
      My uncle took a couple of before and after photos of POWAB.
       
      Thought you might find them interesting.
       
      Chris.....
    • Kurt Laughlin
      The hit on the left center at the fender line is a HEAT impact (Panzerschreck or Panzerfaust) while that on the nose above the sprocket is an AP round hole. KL
      Message 6 of 6 , Mar 9 3:28 PM
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        The hit on the left center at the fender line is a HEAT impact (Panzerschreck or Panzerfaust) while that on the nose above the sprocket is an AP round hole.

         

        KL

         

        From: G104@yahoogroups.com [mailto:G104@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Chris
         

        Tank was named 'POWAB' from No.2 Squadron,1st Platoon. Was platoon commander's tank 2nd Lt. Matykiewicz.

        Hit by anti-tank round or rocket & suffered internal explosion. Happened while crossing Fossatone canal April 19,1945

        during fighting near Bologna. Driver was apparently rescued prior to internal explosion, whether he lived is unknown.

         

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