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Re: [G104] Re: REME Jack for lifting Sherman?

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  • Andy Oertig
    Hi Chris I guess I’ve opened a “can of Worms!” The following is for the American Army & their TO&E... The American Army divided its maintenance repair
    Message 1 of 6 , Jun 12, 2012
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      Hi Chris
      I guess I’ve opened a “can of Worms!” The following is for the American Army & their TO&E...
      The American Army divided its maintenance repair into levels…
      The “10 Level” Maintenance is the operator of the Vehicle (in this case the Tank Crew),
      The "20 Level” Maintenance is the mechanics or wrench turning guys that perform the repairs what the crews can’t or don’t know how to fix (repair Engines, hydraulic systems, etc). These guys would have the tools and spare parts to perform the repairs. These guys would be located in the Maintenance Section of the HQ Platoon. This is where the Jack would be located.
      I am not sure when the Army implemented this system!
      The Lumber or “Blocks” would be to raise the Jack to get it closer to the part needing to be lifted or because they are trying not to jack it to its full operating range of the Jack. I suspect they are trying to get the Arm up high enough to place the repaired arm on so they can add the “Bogie Wheel” or Road Wheel on without removing the track’s center guides… These blocks could be “scrap lumber” scrounged up by the Maintenance Team.
      The Military uses the fancy word “Nomenclature” for the name for these Tools on their Tool BII Listings.  A Great example of this is the current 10 pound Sledge Hammer that the current Bradley Fighting Vehicle & M88A1 & A2 Recovery Crews use… The Crews call it a “Sledge Hammer” but the “Nomenclature” for the Bradley BII listing it as “HAMMER, HAND, SLEDGE, DBL-FACED, 10 LB.” and yet on the M88A1 & A2 call the same “Sledge Hammer” “SLEDGE, BLACKSMITH, DOUBLE FACE, 10 LBS.” It’s the same “Sledge Hammer.”
      Long story short, I don’t know what the Jack’s “Nomenclature” would be… I don’t have the Manual on the M31 or M32 Armored Recovery Vehicle, so you would have to find a Tank Recovery Manual to find the actual “Nomenclature” for the Jack. You might be able to contact the Patton Museum and ask them for help… I’ve afraid I live in Colorado and don’t have any plans in the near future to travel there…
      M31 Armored Recovery Vehicle
      I HOPE this Helps
      IF NOT, we'll try again :)
      Andy
       
       

      From: wroblew705 <wroblew@...>
      To: G104@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Monday, June 11, 2012 12:10 PM
      Subject: [G104] Re: REME Jack for lifting Sherman?

       
      Thank you for that Andy and the clarification. It does help.

      So this is an American jack/tool? Would "20 Level (mechanic)tool kit" be a correct designation for the kit you mention?

      Also would yourself or anyone else have images or diagrams of this jack, its part # or the tool kit it's found in?

      Chris.......

      --- In G104@yahoogroups.com, Andy Oertig <oreob69@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Chris
      > The Jack is not part of the Basic Issue tool Items (BII) for a Sherman Tank. The Jack is part of the 20 Level (Mechanic) tools...
      > The Jack would come from either the Company Tool Truck or the Recovery Vehicle. 
      >
      > While Tank Crews are trained in their level of maintenance, they do not always have the "Spacial Tools" required for the Repair.
      >
      > My experience is having spent 20+ years as an Armored Crewman on M48A5's, M60A1's & A3's and M1's from IP's to M1A1 Heavies
      > in the Active Army.
      >  
      > Hope this Helps
      > Andy
      >
      > ----- Forwarded Message -----
      > From: Chris W <wroblew705@...>
      > To: "G104@yahoogroups.com" <G104@yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Sunday, June 10, 2012 6:10:30 PM
      > Subject: REME Jack for lifting Sherman?
      >
      > Good day
      >
      > Have attached images of a 4th Armored Reg Polish Sherman of the HQ Squadron undergoing repairs to it's suspension after running over a mine about 18 July 1944 outside Ancona Italy. Am curious about the jack they are using as I can find no example of this tool in my M4A2 Manual, it only shows bottle jacks and blocks. Is this jack British REME tooling and does anyone have some clear images or diagrams of this jack and how its used?
      >
      > Regards
      > Chris......



    • wroblew705
      Thanks again Andy. It s more than I knew before but will keep looking. Chris.......
      Message 2 of 6 , Jun 12, 2012
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        Thanks again Andy. It's more than I knew before but will keep looking.

        Chris.......
      • Andy Oertig
        Hey Chris   Glade to help... I just spent the last 7 years traveling the world (the States, Germany & Korea anyway) issuing Combat equipment to Active Duty &
        Message 3 of 6 , Jun 12, 2012
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          Hey Chris
           
          Glade to help... I just spent the last 7 years traveling the world (the States, Germany & Korea anyway) issuing
          Combat equipment to Active Duty & National Guard units. I really enjoyed serving the Troops. Bradleys, M113's,
          M88A1's & A2's, M109A6 Paladin Guns & M992A2 Ammo Carriers.
           
          I'm hoping to put a lot of the Sherman Pictures I took on the G104 Site. I know of 3 Jumbos (Ft Carson, Camp Ripley
          Minasota, and Ft Riley). Riley I don't have pictures of because they moved it from the Cav Museum Area.... All three have
          75mm guns. When I was at Grafenwoehr, I did not see Cobra with the 76mm at Vilseck! 
           
           
          Anyway, dinner is ready
          Take Care
          Andy

          From: wroblew705 <wroblew@...>
          To: G104@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, June 12, 2012 4:03 PM
          Subject: [G104] Re: REME Jack for lifting Sherman?

           
          Thanks again Andy. It's more than I knew before but will keep looking.

          Chris.......



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