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Re: Crew Compartment Heaters

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  • dd161
    Thanks! That answers my question. Did other American tanks have the Little Joe generator-M5/M24-or was it unique to the Sherman? Dave
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 2, 2009
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      Thanks! That answers my question. Did other American tanks have the "Little Joe" generator-M5/M24-or was it unique to the Sherman?
      Dave


      --- In G104@yahoogroups.com, electbud@... wrote:
      >
      > Hi Dave:
      >
      > When the engines were running on a cold day it was FRIGID in a Sherman.
      > The air for combustion and cooling (thru the radiator) was pulled in through
      > the crew compartment and blown out the back of the tank. This served to
      > constantly evacuate the noxious fumes that would waft into the crew
      > compartment from the gun breech (after firing, when the empty shell was ejected and
      > the next round loaded).
      >
      > As cold as it was in winter.....it was relatively comfortable on hot days,
      > with a nice breeze blowing through (as long as the engines were running).
      >
      > Back to winter..... the "little joe" generator would be started as soon
      > as the main engine was shut down. This not only kept the batteries up (for
      > radios)... it WAS also designed to heat the crew compartment.
      >
      > -Bud Walker
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > In a message dated 7/30/2009 1:50:20 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time,
      > dd161@... writes:
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi all-
      >
      > New to this forum. I've always had this question-did WWII American tanks
      > have crew compartment heaters? I know that some models of the Sherman had a
      > generator for the electrical equipment/radios, etc. But was it a heater too?
      >
      > Did the engine/transmissionDid the engine/transmission<WBR>, make a tank
      > warm or was it an icebox in the winter
      >
      > Thanks!
      >
      > Dave
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > **************A bad credit score is 600 & below. Checking won't affect your
      > score. See now!
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      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Don Moriarty
      I m a little stumped.    While doing analysis between the two M4A3E2 s ( RN 3083084 & RN 3083026) a question of dimpling in the steel on the turret
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 8, 2009
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        I'm a little stumped. 
         
        While doing analysis between the two M4A3E2's ( RN 3083084 & RN 3083026) a question of 'dimpling' in the steel on the turret exterior & interior of TN 38 has me curious as well as several questions which seem to pop up.
         
        1) I assume the 'dimples' were due to production technique.  This appears to be unique to this Jumbo, and I can't find photographic examples of others with similiar 'dimples'.  Has anyone else noticed this elsewhere?
         
        2) The turret serial # is located on the turret top & not on the side, as most other vehicles / photos show.  I assume this is unique to the manufacturer.  Are there any other example of this difference.
         
        I have posted photos here: http://s44.photobucket.com/albums/f25/Donmor3/Tank%20Info/M4A3E2%20Jumbo%20Assault%20tank/3083026/
         
        Thanks for the help
        Regards
        Don
         




        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Kurt Laughlin
        Hi Don: IIRC, your old M4A3E2 had a turret cast by Pittsburgh Steel Foundries (PSF) while Cobra King s was cast by Union Steel Castings (USC). Interestingly,
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 8, 2009
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          Hi Don:

          IIRC, your "old" M4A3E2 had a turret cast by Pittsburgh Steel Foundries
          (PSF) while Cobra King's was cast by Union Steel Castings (USC).
          Interestingly, these were both in the Pittsburgh area. The "dimpling" is a
          result of how the molds or patterns were built, but I can't tell exactly
          from the photo. If the metal is actually raised, these could be nail heads
          holding sheet metal against the wood pattern skeleton. The sand molds would
          pick this up and replicate it in the casting. If the casting is actually
          dimpled, these could be foundry nails driven into the sand mold halves to
          give them strength. Again, these would be picked up by the casting.

          Here are some photos I had handy:
          Raised bumps
          http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i301/3373GP4NR/100_1929.jpg
          http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i301/3373GP4NR/100_1890.jpg

          Dimples
          http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i301/3373GP4NR/CastingNails.jpg

          KL

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Don Moriarty

          While doing analysis between the two M4A3E2's ( RN 3083084 & RN 3083026) a
          question of 'dimpling' in the steel on the turret exterior & interior of TN
          38 has me curious as well as several questions which seem to pop up.

          1) I assume the 'dimples' were due to production technique. This appears to
          be unique to this Jumbo, and I can't find photographic examples of others
          with similiar 'dimples'. Has anyone else noticed this elsewhere?

          2) The turret serial # is located on the turret top & not on the side, as
          most other vehicles / photos show. I assume this is unique to the
          manufacturer. Are there any other example of this difference.
        • Don Moriarty
          Kurt   Thank you, you hit the nail on the head (sorry for the pun)   I guess I should have phrased it as goose bumps .  they are raised.   Interestingly
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 8, 2009
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            Kurt
             
            Thank you, you hit the 'nail on the head' (sorry for the pun)
             
            I guess I should have phrased it as 'goose bumps'.  they are raised.
             
            Interestingly enough, this morning, I noticed some of the same 'goose bumps' on the T28 Super Heavy Tank, when I made a quick trip over to the Museum.
             
            Thanks again
            Don




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