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Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

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  • Ray Merriam
    Aanenson s story was that impressive that I remember it all these years later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in The War.
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 18, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      Aanenson's story was that impressive that I remember it all these years
      later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in
      "The War." Found most of that stuff online, of course, and did it as much
      for my own need to know as well as responding to your message. Plus the
      aircraft and airwar of WWII are my personal specialty, even though almost
      anything on WWII interests me.

      Ray

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@...>
      To: <G104@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:29 AM
      Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found


      Ray,
      Thanks for the information. Could have been "A Fighter Pilot's Story." It
      was long ago. You and Joe D'marco certainly are loaded with "the rest of the
      story" as Paul would say. Glad both of you are here to put final touches on
      the bits and pieces we know.
      Billy Ray

      --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@...> wrote:

      From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@...>
      Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
      To: G104@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 1:33 AM






      You're talking about Quentin Aanenson, P-47 pilot, 391st Fighter Squadron,
      366th Fighter Group. The film you're talking about was more than an hour
      (shown over two nights the first time it aired, as I recall) and the
      original title of the documentary he made was "A Fighter Pilot's Story" (PBS
      may have changed it for their airing). Absolutely fascinating. He also was
      one of those interviewed for Ken Burns' "The War":

      http://www.pbs. org/thewar/ detail_5187. htm

      Amazing guy, even when he did the interviews for "The War", more than ten
      years after "An Airman's Story", his memory is a sharp as a tack and is, in
      my opinion, the best interviewee I have ever seen. And he was colorblind and
      thus should not have been a fighter pilot--he took the eye test enough times
      that he memorized it and passed.

      In trying to find a source for the documentary I discovered he had been a
      guest on Charlie Rose (a PBS talk show) but although I sometimes watch Rose,
      I didn't catch it the time Aanenson was on. From the Charlie Rose web site:

      Quentin C. Aanenson is a World War II veteran fighter pilot. He flew the
      P-47 "Thunderbolt" in the Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequently in the
      European campaign. Later in the war he was taken out of the cockpit,
      imbedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
      quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
      experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
      which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
      televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
      in June 1994. It is now available on DVD.

      From Wikipedia (I know, many people hate Wikipedia for information) :

      Quentin C. Aanenson (born April 21, 1921) is a World War II veteran fighter
      pilot and former Captain of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group,
      9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the
      Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequent European campaign.

      Aanenson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 but was not
      called up to active duty until February 1943. He left for Santa Ana Air
      Force Base for pre-flight training and then to Primary Flight School at
      Thunderbird Field near Phoenix, Arizona. In September 1943, he left for
      Basic Flight School at Gardner Field near Bakersfield, California. Aanenson
      then left for Advanced Flight Training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona where
      he was commissioned a second lieutenant on January 7, 1944. From January to
      May 1944, he trained at Harding Field in Baton Rogue, Louisiana where he met
      his wife Jackie [1].

      Aanenson demonstrated exceptional courage and ability as a fighter pilot,
      amassing tens of kills and beating all odds to survive the early months of
      his tour of duty.[2] Later in the war, Aanenson was taken out of the
      cockpit, embedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
      quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
      experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
      which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
      televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
      in June 1994. Up until August 2007, it was available for purchase on DVD.
      The three-hour documentary, made all the more effective by being narrated
      throughout in his flat, affectless voice, tells of a young, enthusiastic,
      cheery boy very rapidly aged by too much death. It also tells of a
      remarkably wide range of combat duties, and details many harrowing
      individual missions, like the one where he and his wing man came upon a
      German convoy, destroyed the vehicles, and when his wing man's guns jammed,
      how Aanenson worked-over the roadside ditches where the convoy soldiers had
      hidden, making multiple passes, "walking" his rudder to spread his fire more
      effectively, so that there would be as few survivors as possible.[3]

      The documentary also tells of a remarkable coincidence, where his P-47 was
      called down to assist some American troops under attack by a tank. He
      surveyed the scene, then reported to the troops that the tank was just too
      near, there was too much chance that he would hit them instead of the tank.
      The officer in command told him to come on in anyway, since they were going
      to be dead if the tank wasn't stopped. He managed to destroy the tank
      cleanly, then recounts how he was telling this story to his new neighbor
      after the war, and the man finished the story for him, then thanked him for
      saving his life.[4]

      The link for Wikipedia (there's more there):

      http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Quentin_C. _Aanenson

      Here's Aanenson's official web site:

      http://pages. prodigy.com/ fighterpilot/

      A note on the site states:

      Information about Documentary Orders
      Due to Mr. Aanenson's medical status, we regret that we will be unable to
      continue offering DVDs of his documentary, A Fighter Pilot's Story.

      No further details about his medical status. There is another page on the
      site that covers the making of the documentary and the aftermath, and that
      the DVD they used to offer had additional footage not seen in the
      documentary. Apparently the production was a family affair.

      The Washington Post did a lengthy article on him after "The War" debuted
      last year. It provides some additional details about the horrors of war that
      Aanenson has lived with ever since:

      http://tinyurl. com/5pxxnm

      Sincerely,

      Ray Merriam
      Owner
      Merriam Press
      133 Elm St Apt 3R
      Bennington VT 05201-2250 USA

      Phone: 802-447-0313
      E-mail: ray@merriam- press.com or merriampress@ comcast.net
      Web site: http://www.merriam- press.com

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
      To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
      Sent: Monday, 17 November 2008 10:05 PM
      Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

      Lee and Ray,
      I once saw "An Airman's Story" on PBS and narrated by the pilot who flew the
      missions. It was about an hour program. Would like to see that film once
      more. It was a film of that airman's WWII missions over Germany. Each
      mission, he had a camera and filmed all his fights, and targets as he hit
      them, and included some footage of the 2 or 3 times he was shot down...he
      survived the war. In about 1995 or so, he found the film of his missions,
      now declassified, and had the movie made. It was awesome!
      Billy















      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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    • CHARLES RAY
      Ray, I have attended several reunions of my Dad s WWII outfit, the 777th Tank Battalion with the 69th Infantry Division.  Those men talked of the good old
      Message 2 of 14 , Nov 18, 2008
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        Ray,
        I have attended several reunions of my Dad's WWII outfit, the 777th Tank Battalion with the 69th Infantry Division.  Those men talked of the good old times but seldom did I hear them bring up what they did and saw during the war.  Not even when I posed the question.
        When I saw "A Fighter Pilot's Story" I could understand better the pain of so many of the survivors who could not retell their experiences.  That PBS story sort of broke the ice. 
        In 2000, Bill Sheavly, Jr, son of a WWII vet, put together a book "The Stories of Our War" which included interviews of the men of the 69th.
        Some day, I'll complete "The Lucky Triple Sevens" and in it tell many of the stories they couldn't and tell didn't tell and back it all with hundreds of photos.
        Billy Ray   

        --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@...> wrote:

        From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@...>
        Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
        To: G104@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 2:20 PM






        Aanenson's story was that impressive that I remember it all these years
        later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in
        "The War." Found most of that stuff online, of course, and did it as much
        for my own need to know as well as responding to your message. Plus the
        aircraft and airwar of WWII are my personal specialty, even though almost
        anything on WWII interests me.

        Ray

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
        To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
        Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:29 AM
        Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

        Ray,
        Thanks for the information. Could have been "A Fighter Pilot's Story." It
        was long ago. You and Joe D'marco certainly are loaded with "the rest of the
        story" as Paul would say. Glad both of you are here to put final touches on
        the bits and pieces we know.
        Billy Ray

        --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

        From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
        Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
        To: G104@yahoogroups. com
        Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 1:33 AM

        You're talking about Quentin Aanenson, P-47 pilot, 391st Fighter Squadron,
        366th Fighter Group. The film you're talking about was more than an hour
        (shown over two nights the first time it aired, as I recall) and the
        original title of the documentary he made was "A Fighter Pilot's Story" (PBS
        may have changed it for their airing). Absolutely fascinating. He also was
        one of those interviewed for Ken Burns' "The War":

        http://www.pbs. org/thewar/ detail_5187. htm

        Amazing guy, even when he did the interviews for "The War", more than ten
        years after "An Airman's Story", his memory is a sharp as a tack and is, in
        my opinion, the best interviewee I have ever seen. And he was colorblind and
        thus should not have been a fighter pilot--he took the eye test enough times
        that he memorized it and passed.

        In trying to find a source for the documentary I discovered he had been a
        guest on Charlie Rose (a PBS talk show) but although I sometimes watch Rose,
        I didn't catch it the time Aanenson was on. From the Charlie Rose web site:

        Quentin C. Aanenson is a World War II veteran fighter pilot. He flew the
        P-47 "Thunderbolt" in the Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequently in the
        European campaign. Later in the war he was taken out of the cockpit,
        imbedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
        quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
        experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
        which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
        televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
        in June 1994. It is now available on DVD.

        From Wikipedia (I know, many people hate Wikipedia for information) :

        Quentin C. Aanenson (born April 21, 1921) is a World War II veteran fighter
        pilot and former Captain of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group,
        9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the
        Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequent European campaign.

        Aanenson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 but was not
        called up to active duty until February 1943. He left for Santa Ana Air
        Force Base for pre-flight training and then to Primary Flight School at
        Thunderbird Field near Phoenix, Arizona. In September 1943, he left for
        Basic Flight School at Gardner Field near Bakersfield, California. Aanenson
        then left for Advanced Flight Training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona where
        he was commissioned a second lieutenant on January 7, 1944. From January to
        May 1944, he trained at Harding Field in Baton Rogue, Louisiana where he met
        his wife Jackie [1].

        Aanenson demonstrated exceptional courage and ability as a fighter pilot,
        amassing tens of kills and beating all odds to survive the early months of
        his tour of duty.[2] Later in the war, Aanenson was taken out of the
        cockpit, embedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
        quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
        experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
        which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
        televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
        in June 1994. Up until August 2007, it was available for purchase on DVD.
        The three-hour documentary, made all the more effective by being narrated
        throughout in his flat, affectless voice, tells of a young, enthusiastic,
        cheery boy very rapidly aged by too much death. It also tells of a
        remarkably wide range of combat duties, and details many harrowing
        individual missions, like the one where he and his wing man came upon a
        German convoy, destroyed the vehicles, and when his wing man's guns jammed,
        how Aanenson worked-over the roadside ditches where the convoy soldiers had
        hidden, making multiple passes, "walking" his rudder to spread his fire more
        effectively, so that there would be as few survivors as possible.[3]

        The documentary also tells of a remarkable coincidence, where his P-47 was
        called down to assist some American troops under attack by a tank. He
        surveyed the scene, then reported to the troops that the tank was just too
        near, there was too much chance that he would hit them instead of the tank.
        The officer in command told him to come on in anyway, since they were going
        to be dead if the tank wasn't stopped. He managed to destroy the tank
        cleanly, then recounts how he was telling this story to his new neighbor
        after the war, and the man finished the story for him, then thanked him for
        saving his life.[4]

        The link for Wikipedia (there's more there):

        http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Quentin_C. _Aanenson

        Here's Aanenson's official web site:

        http://pages. prodigy.com/ fighterpilot/

        A note on the site states:

        Information about Documentary Orders
        Due to Mr. Aanenson's medical status, we regret that we will be unable to
        continue offering DVDs of his documentary, A Fighter Pilot's Story.

        No further details about his medical status. There is another page on the
        site that covers the making of the documentary and the aftermath, and that
        the DVD they used to offer had additional footage not seen in the
        documentary. Apparently the production was a family affair.

        The Washington Post did a lengthy article on him after "The War" debuted
        last year. It provides some additional details about the horrors of war that
        Aanenson has lived with ever since:

        http://tinyurl. com/5pxxnm

        Sincerely,

        Ray Merriam
        Owner
        Merriam Press
        133 Elm St Apt 3R
        Bennington VT 05201-2250 USA

        Phone: 802-447-0313
        E-mail: ray@merriam- press.com or merriampress@ comcast.net
        Web site: http://www.merriam- press.com

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
        To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
        Sent: Monday, 17 November 2008 10:05 PM
        Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

        Lee and Ray,
        I once saw "An Airman's Story" on PBS and narrated by the pilot who flew the
        missions. It was about an hour program. Would like to see that film once
        more. It was a film of that airman's WWII missions over Germany. Each
        mission, he had a camera and filmed all his fights, and targets as he hit
        them, and included some footage of the 2 or 3 times he was shot down...he
        survived the war. In about 1995 or so, he found the film of his missions,
        now declassified, and had the movie made. It was awesome!
        Billy

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

        ------------ --------- --------- ------

        ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~
        **Please trim your replies**
        **Do not post in HTML or "Rich Text" mode**
        **Plain ASCII Text only please**
        **Attachments will be stripped**
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
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        http://www.inter. nl.net/users/ spoelstra/ g104
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
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        http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/G104
        ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
        Yahoo! Groups Links















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Ray Merriam
        Hi Billy, Yes, this is a very common occurrence. They will tell all sorts of humorous stories, if they talk at all about their wartime experiences. But few
        Message 3 of 14 , Nov 18, 2008
        • 0 Attachment
          Hi Billy,

          Yes, this is a very common occurrence. They will tell all sorts of humorous
          stories, if they talk at all about their wartime experiences. But few will
          talk or write about the combat experience. I have encountered this for years
          and even children and grandchildren of veterans tell me that their relatives
          never spoke of their combat or even general wartime experiences. For some it
          took seeing a movie with their children (a UPS driver told me that his
          father, a USN sub vet, didn't say anything until the two of them saw "Das
          Boot" together and then the floodgates opened). I hear from many
          children/grandchildren whose relatives have passed away and they are trying
          to piece togetheran idea of what their relatives went through by getting
          memoirs written by veterans in the same unit, battles, or theater. In a few
          cases, the books I have published have mentioned people and the family finds
          out and discover info that way.

          My own father never said much about his wartime service, which was in the
          Aleutians, but he never saw any combat.

          Ray

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@...>
          To: <G104@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 4:44 PM
          Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found


          Ray,
          I have attended several reunions of my Dad's WWII outfit, the 777th Tank
          Battalion with the 69th Infantry Division. Those men talked of the good old
          times but seldom did I hear them bring up what they did and saw during the
          war. Not even when I posed the question.
          When I saw "A Fighter Pilot's Story" I could understand better the pain of
          so many of the survivors who could not retell their experiences. That PBS
          story sort of broke the ice.
          In 2000, Bill Sheavly, Jr, son of a WWII vet, put together a book "The
          Stories of Our War" which included interviews of the men of the 69th.
          Some day, I'll complete "The Lucky Triple Sevens" and in it tell many of the
          stories they couldn't and tell didn't tell and back it all with hundreds of
          photos.
          Billy Ray

          --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@...> wrote:

          From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@...>
          Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
          To: G104@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 2:20 PM






          Aanenson's story was that impressive that I remember it all these years
          later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in
          "The War." Found most of that stuff online, of course, and did it as much
          for my own need to know as well as responding to your message. Plus the
          aircraft and airwar of WWII are my personal specialty, even though almost
          anything on WWII interests me.

          Ray

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
          To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
          Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:29 AM
          Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

          Ray,
          Thanks for the information. Could have been "A Fighter Pilot's Story." It
          was long ago. You and Joe D'marco certainly are loaded with "the rest of the
          story" as Paul would say. Glad both of you are here to put final touches on
          the bits and pieces we know.
          Billy Ray

          --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

          From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
          Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
          To: G104@yahoogroups. com
          Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 1:33 AM

          You're talking about Quentin Aanenson, P-47 pilot, 391st Fighter Squadron,
          366th Fighter Group. The film you're talking about was more than an hour
          (shown over two nights the first time it aired, as I recall) and the
          original title of the documentary he made was "A Fighter Pilot's Story" (PBS
          may have changed it for their airing). Absolutely fascinating. He also was
          one of those interviewed for Ken Burns' "The War":

          http://www.pbs. org/thewar/ detail_5187. htm

          Amazing guy, even when he did the interviews for "The War", more than ten
          years after "An Airman's Story", his memory is a sharp as a tack and is, in
          my opinion, the best interviewee I have ever seen. And he was colorblind and
          thus should not have been a fighter pilot--he took the eye test enough times
          that he memorized it and passed.

          In trying to find a source for the documentary I discovered he had been a
          guest on Charlie Rose (a PBS talk show) but although I sometimes watch Rose,
          I didn't catch it the time Aanenson was on. From the Charlie Rose web site:

          Quentin C. Aanenson is a World War II veteran fighter pilot. He flew the
          P-47 "Thunderbolt" in the Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequently in the
          European campaign. Later in the war he was taken out of the cockpit,
          imbedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
          quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
          experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
          which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
          televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
          in June 1994. It is now available on DVD.

          From Wikipedia (I know, many people hate Wikipedia for information) :

          Quentin C. Aanenson (born April 21, 1921) is a World War II veteran fighter
          pilot and former Captain of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group,
          9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the
          Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequent European campaign.

          Aanenson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 but was not
          called up to active duty until February 1943. He left for Santa Ana Air
          Force Base for pre-flight training and then to Primary Flight School at
          Thunderbird Field near Phoenix, Arizona. In September 1943, he left for
          Basic Flight School at Gardner Field near Bakersfield, California. Aanenson
          then left for Advanced Flight Training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona where
          he was commissioned a second lieutenant on January 7, 1944. From January to
          May 1944, he trained at Harding Field in Baton Rogue, Louisiana where he met
          his wife Jackie [1].

          Aanenson demonstrated exceptional courage and ability as a fighter pilot,
          amassing tens of kills and beating all odds to survive the early months of
          his tour of duty.[2] Later in the war, Aanenson was taken out of the
          cockpit, embedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
          quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
          experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
          which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
          televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
          in June 1994. Up until August 2007, it was available for purchase on DVD.
          The three-hour documentary, made all the more effective by being narrated
          throughout in his flat, affectless voice, tells of a young, enthusiastic,
          cheery boy very rapidly aged by too much death. It also tells of a
          remarkably wide range of combat duties, and details many harrowing
          individual missions, like the one where he and his wing man came upon a
          German convoy, destroyed the vehicles, and when his wing man's guns jammed,
          how Aanenson worked-over the roadside ditches where the convoy soldiers had
          hidden, making multiple passes, "walking" his rudder to spread his fire more
          effectively, so that there would be as few survivors as possible.[3]

          The documentary also tells of a remarkable coincidence, where his P-47 was
          called down to assist some American troops under attack by a tank. He
          surveyed the scene, then reported to the troops that the tank was just too
          near, there was too much chance that he would hit them instead of the tank.
          The officer in command told him to come on in anyway, since they were going
          to be dead if the tank wasn't stopped. He managed to destroy the tank
          cleanly, then recounts how he was telling this story to his new neighbor
          after the war, and the man finished the story for him, then thanked him for
          saving his life.[4]

          The link for Wikipedia (there's more there):

          http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Quentin_C. _Aanenson

          Here's Aanenson's official web site:

          http://pages. prodigy.com/ fighterpilot/

          A note on the site states:

          Information about Documentary Orders
          Due to Mr. Aanenson's medical status, we regret that we will be unable to
          continue offering DVDs of his documentary, A Fighter Pilot's Story.

          No further details about his medical status. There is another page on the
          site that covers the making of the documentary and the aftermath, and that
          the DVD they used to offer had additional footage not seen in the
          documentary. Apparently the production was a family affair.

          The Washington Post did a lengthy article on him after "The War" debuted
          last year. It provides some additional details about the horrors of war that
          Aanenson has lived with ever since:

          http://tinyurl. com/5pxxnm

          Sincerely,

          Ray Merriam
          Owner
          Merriam Press
          133 Elm St Apt 3R
          Bennington VT 05201-2250 USA

          Phone: 802-447-0313
          E-mail: ray@merriam- press.com or merriampress@ comcast.net
          Web site: http://www.merriam- press.com

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
          To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
          Sent: Monday, 17 November 2008 10:05 PM
          Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

          Lee and Ray,
          I once saw "An Airman's Story" on PBS and narrated by the pilot who flew the
          missions. It was about an hour program. Would like to see that film once
          more. It was a film of that airman's WWII missions over Germany. Each
          mission, he had a camera and filmed all his fights, and targets as he hit
          them, and included some footage of the 2 or 3 times he was shot down...he
          survived the war. In about 1995 or so, he found the film of his missions,
          now declassified, and had the movie made. It was awesome!
          Billy

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          ------------ --------- --------- ------

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          ------------------------------------

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        • CHARLES RAY
          Ray, I read about the Aleutians and WWII and then saw a movie about it as well.  Must have been many years back when I had the History Channel.  I remember
          Message 4 of 14 , Nov 18, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            Ray,
            I read about the Aleutians and WWII and then saw a movie about it as well.  Must have been many years back when I had the History Channel.  I remember that there was some pretty tough fighting there and many men lost their lives.  The Japanese lost, as I remember, some 3,000 men in one battle.  They just stood up and died.  I believe the TV compared that battle to Iwo Jima, maybe second.  The death and casualties they saw on Attu was probably why no one spoke of their time there.
            Billy 

            --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@...> wrote:

            From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@...>
            Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
            To: G104@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 5:30 PM






            Hi Billy,

            Yes, this is a very common occurrence. They will tell all sorts of humorous
            stories, if they talk at all about their wartime experiences. But few will
            talk or write about the combat experience. I have encountered this for years
            and even children and grandchildren of veterans tell me that their relatives
            never spoke of their combat or even general wartime experiences. For some it
            took seeing a movie with their children (a UPS driver told me that his
            father, a USN sub vet, didn't say anything until the two of them saw "Das
            Boot" together and then the floodgates opened). I hear from many
            children/grandchild ren whose relatives have passed away and they are trying
            to piece togetheran idea of what their relatives went through by getting
            memoirs written by veterans in the same unit, battles, or theater. In a few
            cases, the books I have published have mentioned people and the family finds
            out and discover info that way.

            My own father never said much about his wartime service, which was in the
            Aleutians, but he never saw any combat.

            Ray

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
            To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
            Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 4:44 PM
            Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

            Ray,
            I have attended several reunions of my Dad's WWII outfit, the 777th Tank
            Battalion with the 69th Infantry Division. Those men talked of the good old
            times but seldom did I hear them bring up what they did and saw during the
            war. Not even when I posed the question.
            When I saw "A Fighter Pilot's Story" I could understand better the pain of
            so many of the survivors who could not retell their experiences. That PBS
            story sort of broke the ice.
            In 2000, Bill Sheavly, Jr, son of a WWII vet, put together a book "The
            Stories of Our War" which included interviews of the men of the 69th.
            Some day, I'll complete "The Lucky Triple Sevens" and in it tell many of the
            stories they couldn't and tell didn't tell and back it all with hundreds of
            photos.
            Billy Ray

            --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

            From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
            Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
            To: G104@yahoogroups. com
            Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 2:20 PM

            Aanenson's story was that impressive that I remember it all these years
            later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in
            "The War." Found most of that stuff online, of course, and did it as much
            for my own need to know as well as responding to your message. Plus the
            aircraft and airwar of WWII are my personal specialty, even though almost
            anything on WWII interests me.

            Ray

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
            To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
            Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:29 AM
            Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

            Ray,
            Thanks for the information. Could have been "A Fighter Pilot's Story." It
            was long ago. You and Joe D'marco certainly are loaded with "the rest of the
            story" as Paul would say. Glad both of you are here to put final touches on
            the bits and pieces we know.
            Billy Ray

            --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

            From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
            Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
            To: G104@yahoogroups. com
            Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 1:33 AM

            You're talking about Quentin Aanenson, P-47 pilot, 391st Fighter Squadron,
            366th Fighter Group. The film you're talking about was more than an hour
            (shown over two nights the first time it aired, as I recall) and the
            original title of the documentary he made was "A Fighter Pilot's Story" (PBS
            may have changed it for their airing). Absolutely fascinating. He also was
            one of those interviewed for Ken Burns' "The War":

            http://www.pbs. org/thewar/ detail_5187. htm

            Amazing guy, even when he did the interviews for "The War", more than ten
            years after "An Airman's Story", his memory is a sharp as a tack and is, in
            my opinion, the best interviewee I have ever seen. And he was colorblind and
            thus should not have been a fighter pilot--he took the eye test enough times
            that he memorized it and passed.

            In trying to find a source for the documentary I discovered he had been a
            guest on Charlie Rose (a PBS talk show) but although I sometimes watch Rose,
            I didn't catch it the time Aanenson was on. From the Charlie Rose web site:

            Quentin C. Aanenson is a World War II veteran fighter pilot. He flew the
            P-47 "Thunderbolt" in the Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequently in the
            European campaign. Later in the war he was taken out of the cockpit,
            imbedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
            quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
            experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
            which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
            televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
            in June 1994. It is now available on DVD.

            From Wikipedia (I know, many people hate Wikipedia for information) :

            Quentin C. Aanenson (born April 21, 1921) is a World War II veteran fighter
            pilot and former Captain of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group,
            9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the
            Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequent European campaign.

            Aanenson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 but was not
            called up to active duty until February 1943. He left for Santa Ana Air
            Force Base for pre-flight training and then to Primary Flight School at
            Thunderbird Field near Phoenix, Arizona. In September 1943, he left for
            Basic Flight School at Gardner Field near Bakersfield, California. Aanenson
            then left for Advanced Flight Training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona where
            he was commissioned a second lieutenant on January 7, 1944. From January to
            May 1944, he trained at Harding Field in Baton Rogue, Louisiana where he met
            his wife Jackie [1].

            Aanenson demonstrated exceptional courage and ability as a fighter pilot,
            amassing tens of kills and beating all odds to survive the early months of
            his tour of duty.[2] Later in the war, Aanenson was taken out of the
            cockpit, embedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
            quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
            experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
            which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
            televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
            in June 1994. Up until August 2007, it was available for purchase on DVD.
            The three-hour documentary, made all the more effective by being narrated
            throughout in his flat, affectless voice, tells of a young, enthusiastic,
            cheery boy very rapidly aged by too much death. It also tells of a
            remarkably wide range of combat duties, and details many harrowing
            individual missions, like the one where he and his wing man came upon a
            German convoy, destroyed the vehicles, and when his wing man's guns jammed,
            how Aanenson worked-over the roadside ditches where the convoy soldiers had
            hidden, making multiple passes, "walking" his rudder to spread his fire more
            effectively, so that there would be as few survivors as possible.[3]

            The documentary also tells of a remarkable coincidence, where his P-47 was
            called down to assist some American troops under attack by a tank. He
            surveyed the scene, then reported to the troops that the tank was just too
            near, there was too much chance that he would hit them instead of the tank.
            The officer in command told him to come on in anyway, since they were going
            to be dead if the tank wasn't stopped. He managed to destroy the tank
            cleanly, then recounts how he was telling this story to his new neighbor
            after the war, and the man finished the story for him, then thanked him for
            saving his life.[4]

            The link for Wikipedia (there's more there):

            http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Quentin_C. _Aanenson

            Here's Aanenson's official web site:

            http://pages. prodigy.com/ fighterpilot/

            A note on the site states:

            Information about Documentary Orders
            Due to Mr. Aanenson's medical status, we regret that we will be unable to
            continue offering DVDs of his documentary, A Fighter Pilot's Story.

            No further details about his medical status. There is another page on the
            site that covers the making of the documentary and the aftermath, and that
            the DVD they used to offer had additional footage not seen in the
            documentary. Apparently the production was a family affair.

            The Washington Post did a lengthy article on him after "The War" debuted
            last year. It provides some additional details about the horrors of war that
            Aanenson has lived with ever since:

            http://tinyurl. com/5pxxnm

            Sincerely,

            Ray Merriam
            Owner
            Merriam Press
            133 Elm St Apt 3R
            Bennington VT 05201-2250 USA

            Phone: 802-447-0313
            E-mail: ray@merriam- press.com or merriampress@ comcast.net
            Web site: http://www.merriam- press.com

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
            To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
            Sent: Monday, 17 November 2008 10:05 PM
            Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

            Lee and Ray,
            I once saw "An Airman's Story" on PBS and narrated by the pilot who flew the
            missions. It was about an hour program. Would like to see that film once
            more. It was a film of that airman's WWII missions over Germany. Each
            mission, he had a camera and filmed all his fights, and targets as he hit
            them, and included some footage of the 2 or 3 times he was shot down...he
            survived the war. In about 1995 or so, he found the film of his missions,
            now declassified, and had the movie made. It was awesome!
            Billy

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            ------------ --------- --------- ------

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            ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
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            http://www.inter. nl.net/users/ spoelstra/ g104
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
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            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/G104
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
            Yahoo! Groups Links

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

            ------------ --------- --------- ------

            ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~
            **Please trim your replies**
            **Do not post in HTML or "Rich Text" mode**
            **Plain ASCII Text only please**
            **Attachments will be stripped**
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
            Sherman Register
            http://www.inter. nl.net/users/ spoelstra/ g104
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
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            http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/G104
            ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Ray Merriam
            Hi Billy, Ground fighting in the Aleutians was confined to Attu. The Japanese occupied Kiska but then slipped away just before the Americans arrived there.
            Message 5 of 14 , Nov 18, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi Billy,

              Ground fighting in the Aleutians was confined to Attu. The Japanese occupied
              Kiska but then slipped away just before the Americans arrived there. More
              men were killed in the landings than were killed fighting the enemy. The
              Japanese were virtually wiped out in a Banzai charge at the end, only a few
              were taken prisoner. There were some Japanese aerial attacks on some of the
              other islands and American aerial attacks on the Japanese on Attu and Kiska.
              Naval combat was all but non-existent due to the what is considered the
              worst weather and sea conditions in the world around the Aleutian Islands.
              My father was never even near the combat. He once pointed out the island he
              was statione don, which was very close to the mainland. I can't say for
              certain, but because he was an oil burner serviceman before and after the
              war, I suspect he was sent there for his "expertise" in that job (he was 24
              when he enlisted in the Army in mid 1942). And I suspect the island had a
              radar station there as there was not much else on the island judging from
              the photos he had which I saw when I was young (they were lost in the
              mid-60s, save for a few that found their way into the family photo
              collection instead of his own personal album). He mentioned once flying in a
              B-25 to Dutch Harbor for R&R, or maybe it was from Dutch Harbor to the
              mainland and back (this came up when we watched the Twilight Zone episode
              with William Shatner about a B-25 being found in the desert years after the
              war, along the lines of the B-24 "Lady Be Good"). My father talked about the
              weather there--the cold and especially the winds which are some of the
              fiercest in the world (he mentioned you could have your feet flat on the
              ground and be almost perfectly horizontal).

              Ray

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@...>
              To: <G104@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:26 PM
              Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found


              Ray,
              I read about the Aleutians and WWII and then saw a movie about it as well.
              Must have been many years back when I had the History Channel. I remember
              that there was some pretty tough fighting there and many men lost their
              lives. The Japanese lost, as I remember, some 3,000 men in one battle. They
              just stood up and died. I believe the TV compared that battle to Iwo Jima,
              maybe second. The death and casualties they saw on Attu was probably why no
              one spoke of their time there.
              Billy

              --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@...> wrote:

              From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@...>
              Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
              To: G104@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 5:30 PM






              Hi Billy,

              Yes, this is a very common occurrence. They will tell all sorts of humorous
              stories, if they talk at all about their wartime experiences. But few will
              talk or write about the combat experience. I have encountered this for years
              and even children and grandchildren of veterans tell me that their relatives
              never spoke of their combat or even general wartime experiences. For some it
              took seeing a movie with their children (a UPS driver told me that his
              father, a USN sub vet, didn't say anything until the two of them saw "Das
              Boot" together and then the floodgates opened). I hear from many
              children/grandchild ren whose relatives have passed away and they are trying
              to piece togetheran idea of what their relatives went through by getting
              memoirs written by veterans in the same unit, battles, or theater. In a few
              cases, the books I have published have mentioned people and the family finds
              out and discover info that way.

              My own father never said much about his wartime service, which was in the
              Aleutians, but he never saw any combat.

              Ray

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
              To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
              Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 4:44 PM
              Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

              Ray,
              I have attended several reunions of my Dad's WWII outfit, the 777th Tank
              Battalion with the 69th Infantry Division. Those men talked of the good old
              times but seldom did I hear them bring up what they did and saw during the
              war. Not even when I posed the question.
              When I saw "A Fighter Pilot's Story" I could understand better the pain of
              so many of the survivors who could not retell their experiences. That PBS
              story sort of broke the ice.
              In 2000, Bill Sheavly, Jr, son of a WWII vet, put together a book "The
              Stories of Our War" which included interviews of the men of the 69th.
              Some day, I'll complete "The Lucky Triple Sevens" and in it tell many of the
              stories they couldn't and tell didn't tell and back it all with hundreds of
              photos.
              Billy Ray

              --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

              From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
              Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
              To: G104@yahoogroups. com
              Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 2:20 PM

              Aanenson's story was that impressive that I remember it all these years
              later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in
              "The War." Found most of that stuff online, of course, and did it as much
              for my own need to know as well as responding to your message. Plus the
              aircraft and airwar of WWII are my personal specialty, even though almost
              anything on WWII interests me.

              Ray

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
              To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
              Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:29 AM
              Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

              Ray,
              Thanks for the information. Could have been "A Fighter Pilot's Story." It
              was long ago. You and Joe D'marco certainly are loaded with "the rest of the
              story" as Paul would say. Glad both of you are here to put final touches on
              the bits and pieces we know.
              Billy Ray

              --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

              From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
              Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
              To: G104@yahoogroups. com
              Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 1:33 AM

              You're talking about Quentin Aanenson, P-47 pilot, 391st Fighter Squadron,
              366th Fighter Group. The film you're talking about was more than an hour
              (shown over two nights the first time it aired, as I recall) and the
              original title of the documentary he made was "A Fighter Pilot's Story" (PBS
              may have changed it for their airing). Absolutely fascinating. He also was
              one of those interviewed for Ken Burns' "The War":

              http://www.pbs. org/thewar/ detail_5187. htm

              Amazing guy, even when he did the interviews for "The War", more than ten
              years after "An Airman's Story", his memory is a sharp as a tack and is, in
              my opinion, the best interviewee I have ever seen. And he was colorblind and
              thus should not have been a fighter pilot--he took the eye test enough times
              that he memorized it and passed.

              In trying to find a source for the documentary I discovered he had been a
              guest on Charlie Rose (a PBS talk show) but although I sometimes watch Rose,
              I didn't catch it the time Aanenson was on. From the Charlie Rose web site:

              Quentin C. Aanenson is a World War II veteran fighter pilot. He flew the
              P-47 "Thunderbolt" in the Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequently in the
              European campaign. Later in the war he was taken out of the cockpit,
              imbedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
              quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
              experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
              which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
              televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
              in June 1994. It is now available on DVD.

              From Wikipedia (I know, many people hate Wikipedia for information) :

              Quentin C. Aanenson (born April 21, 1921) is a World War II veteran fighter
              pilot and former Captain of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group,
              9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the
              Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequent European campaign.

              Aanenson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 but was not
              called up to active duty until February 1943. He left for Santa Ana Air
              Force Base for pre-flight training and then to Primary Flight School at
              Thunderbird Field near Phoenix, Arizona. In September 1943, he left for
              Basic Flight School at Gardner Field near Bakersfield, California. Aanenson
              then left for Advanced Flight Training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona where
              he was commissioned a second lieutenant on January 7, 1944. From January to
              May 1944, he trained at Harding Field in Baton Rogue, Louisiana where he met
              his wife Jackie [1].

              Aanenson demonstrated exceptional courage and ability as a fighter pilot,
              amassing tens of kills and beating all odds to survive the early months of
              his tour of duty.[2] Later in the war, Aanenson was taken out of the
              cockpit, embedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
              quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
              experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
              which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
              televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
              in June 1994. Up until August 2007, it was available for purchase on DVD.
              The three-hour documentary, made all the more effective by being narrated
              throughout in his flat, affectless voice, tells of a young, enthusiastic,
              cheery boy very rapidly aged by too much death. It also tells of a
              remarkably wide range of combat duties, and details many harrowing
              individual missions, like the one where he and his wing man came upon a
              German convoy, destroyed the vehicles, and when his wing man's guns jammed,
              how Aanenson worked-over the roadside ditches where the convoy soldiers had
              hidden, making multiple passes, "walking" his rudder to spread his fire more
              effectively, so that there would be as few survivors as possible.[3]

              The documentary also tells of a remarkable coincidence, where his P-47 was
              called down to assist some American troops under attack by a tank. He
              surveyed the scene, then reported to the troops that the tank was just too
              near, there was too much chance that he would hit them instead of the tank.
              The officer in command told him to come on in anyway, since they were going
              to be dead if the tank wasn't stopped. He managed to destroy the tank
              cleanly, then recounts how he was telling this story to his new neighbor
              after the war, and the man finished the story for him, then thanked him for
              saving his life.[4]

              The link for Wikipedia (there's more there):

              http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Quentin_C. _Aanenson

              Here's Aanenson's official web site:

              http://pages. prodigy.com/ fighterpilot/

              A note on the site states:

              Information about Documentary Orders
              Due to Mr. Aanenson's medical status, we regret that we will be unable to
              continue offering DVDs of his documentary, A Fighter Pilot's Story.

              No further details about his medical status. There is another page on the
              site that covers the making of the documentary and the aftermath, and that
              the DVD they used to offer had additional footage not seen in the
              documentary. Apparently the production was a family affair.

              The Washington Post did a lengthy article on him after "The War" debuted
              last year. It provides some additional details about the horrors of war that
              Aanenson has lived with ever since:

              http://tinyurl. com/5pxxnm

              Sincerely,

              Ray Merriam
              Owner
              Merriam Press
              133 Elm St Apt 3R
              Bennington VT 05201-2250 USA

              Phone: 802-447-0313
              E-mail: ray@merriam- press.com or merriampress@ comcast.net
              Web site: http://www.merriam- press.com

              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
              To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
              Sent: Monday, 17 November 2008 10:05 PM
              Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

              Lee and Ray,
              I once saw "An Airman's Story" on PBS and narrated by the pilot who flew the
              missions. It was about an hour program. Would like to see that film once
              more. It was a film of that airman's WWII missions over Germany. Each
              mission, he had a camera and filmed all his fights, and targets as he hit
              them, and included some footage of the 2 or 3 times he was shot down...he
              survived the war. In about 1995 or so, he found the film of his missions,
              now declassified, and had the movie made. It was awesome!
              Billy

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              ------------ --------- --------- ------

              ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~
              **Please trim your replies**
              **Do not post in HTML or "Rich Text" mode**
              **Plain ASCII Text only please**
              **Attachments will be stripped**
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
              Sherman Register
              http://www.inter. nl.net/users/ spoelstra/ g104
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
              G104 - the Sherman Register mailing list
              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/G104
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

              ------------ --------- --------- ------

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              **Please trim your replies**
              **Do not post in HTML or "Rich Text" mode**
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              ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
              Sherman Register
              http://www.inter. nl.net/users/ spoelstra/ g104
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              http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/G104
              ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
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              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


              ------------------------------------

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            • CHARLES RAY
              Ray, Were the men in the Aleutians awarded the American Campaign medal?  Seems that even though you Dad saw no combat, the medal should still be appropriate.
              Message 6 of 14 , Nov 19, 2008
              • 0 Attachment
                Ray,
                Were the men in the Aleutians awarded the American Campaign medal?  Seems that even though you Dad saw no combat, the medal should still be appropriate.
                Speaking of wind.  I was once in the Azores in the Atlantic where the wind was strong like you mentioned in the Aleutians.  We landed there on a C-141 from Frankfurt to Charleston, and had a "delay for weather".  A bunch of us went to the Base Exchange and Recreation Center, which were at the top of the hill, to wait out the weather.  We walked from the Pasenger Terminal.  Just at the bottom of the hill, the wind picked up...walking up the hill was no problem...we were literally blown up the hill and had to lean back or be blown over.  On the way back, it was impossible to walk down the hill...leaning into the wind didn't work.  We knew our plane wouldn't leave in that weather so we went back to safety and waited for the "big blow" to pass.  Later, after the wind died down, we walked normally down the hill.  The plane was still there and we continued on to Charleston.
                And speaking of the "Lady Be Good"...I was sent from Hahn AB, Germany to Wheelus AB, Libya in April 1965.  There is a memorial to the crew of the "Lady Be Good" there under the flag pole at Base Headquarters.   As I remember it, one of the propellers was brought to Wheelus and used in the memorial.  I posted a photo in the 777th Album.  I also remember seeing a documentary on the ill-fated mission.  The documentary indicated a sand storm and fuel consumption forced some of the planes to turn back before reaching Naples and those that continued on also turned back and arrived at their base in the desert...The LBG probably made an error in navigation and got off course and remained off course until out of gas and crashed some 300 miles from its home base.
                I probably should read up on all the stuff I remember...bet it is posted somewhere.  My memory seems to remain true in most cases...only my eyesight has been getting bad. 
                They found the plane and the crew only a few years before I arrived at Wheelus and the permanent party guys were still talking about the plane's recovery in 1965.
                Billy
                --- On Wed, 11/19/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@...> wrote:

                From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@...>
                Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                To: G104@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2008, 12:33 AM






                Hi Billy,

                Ground fighting in the Aleutians was confined to Attu. The Japanese occupied
                Kiska but then slipped away just before the Americans arrived there. More
                men were killed in the landings than were killed fighting the enemy. The
                Japanese were virtually wiped out in a Banzai charge at the end, only a few
                were taken prisoner. There were some Japanese aerial attacks on some of the
                other islands and American aerial attacks on the Japanese on Attu and Kiska.
                Naval combat was all but non-existent due to the what is considered the
                worst weather and sea conditions in the world around the Aleutian Islands.
                My father was never even near the combat. He once pointed out the island he
                was statione don, which was very close to the mainland. I can't say for
                certain, but because he was an oil burner serviceman before and after the
                war, I suspect he was sent there for his "expertise" in that job (he was 24
                when he enlisted in the Army in mid 1942). And I suspect the island had a
                radar station there as there was not much else on the island judging from
                the photos he had which I saw when I was young (they were lost in the
                mid-60s, save for a few that found their way into the family photo
                collection instead of his own personal album). He mentioned once flying in a
                B-25 to Dutch Harbor for R&R, or maybe it was from Dutch Harbor to the
                mainland and back (this came up when we watched the Twilight Zone episode
                with William Shatner about a B-25 being found in the desert years after the
                war, along the lines of the B-24 "Lady Be Good"). My father talked about the
                weather there--the cold and especially the winds which are some of the
                fiercest in the world (he mentioned you could have your feet flat on the
                ground and be almost perfectly horizontal).

                Ray

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
                Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:26 PM
                Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                Ray,
                I read about the Aleutians and WWII and then saw a movie about it as well.
                Must have been many years back when I had the History Channel. I remember
                that there was some pretty tough fighting there and many men lost their
                lives. The Japanese lost, as I remember, some 3,000 men in one battle. They
                just stood up and died. I believe the TV compared that battle to Iwo Jima,
                maybe second. The death and casualties they saw on Attu was probably why no
                one spoke of their time there.
                Billy

                --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

                From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
                Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                To: G104@yahoogroups. com
                Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 5:30 PM

                Hi Billy,

                Yes, this is a very common occurrence. They will tell all sorts of humorous
                stories, if they talk at all about their wartime experiences. But few will
                talk or write about the combat experience. I have encountered this for years
                and even children and grandchildren of veterans tell me that their relatives
                never spoke of their combat or even general wartime experiences. For some it
                took seeing a movie with their children (a UPS driver told me that his
                father, a USN sub vet, didn't say anything until the two of them saw "Das
                Boot" together and then the floodgates opened). I hear from many
                children/grandchild ren whose relatives have passed away and they are trying
                to piece togetheran idea of what their relatives went through by getting
                memoirs written by veterans in the same unit, battles, or theater. In a few
                cases, the books I have published have mentioned people and the family finds
                out and discover info that way.

                My own father never said much about his wartime service, which was in the
                Aleutians, but he never saw any combat.

                Ray

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
                Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 4:44 PM
                Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                Ray,
                I have attended several reunions of my Dad's WWII outfit, the 777th Tank
                Battalion with the 69th Infantry Division. Those men talked of the good old
                times but seldom did I hear them bring up what they did and saw during the
                war. Not even when I posed the question.
                When I saw "A Fighter Pilot's Story" I could understand better the pain of
                so many of the survivors who could not retell their experiences. That PBS
                story sort of broke the ice.
                In 2000, Bill Sheavly, Jr, son of a WWII vet, put together a book "The
                Stories of Our War" which included interviews of the men of the 69th.
                Some day, I'll complete "The Lucky Triple Sevens" and in it tell many of the
                stories they couldn't and tell didn't tell and back it all with hundreds of
                photos.
                Billy Ray

                --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

                From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
                Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                To: G104@yahoogroups. com
                Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 2:20 PM

                Aanenson's story was that impressive that I remember it all these years
                later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in
                "The War." Found most of that stuff online, of course, and did it as much
                for my own need to know as well as responding to your message. Plus the
                aircraft and airwar of WWII are my personal specialty, even though almost
                anything on WWII interests me.

                Ray

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
                Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:29 AM
                Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                Ray,
                Thanks for the information. Could have been "A Fighter Pilot's Story." It
                was long ago. You and Joe D'marco certainly are loaded with "the rest of the
                story" as Paul would say. Glad both of you are here to put final touches on
                the bits and pieces we know.
                Billy Ray

                --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

                From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
                Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                To: G104@yahoogroups. com
                Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 1:33 AM

                You're talking about Quentin Aanenson, P-47 pilot, 391st Fighter Squadron,
                366th Fighter Group. The film you're talking about was more than an hour
                (shown over two nights the first time it aired, as I recall) and the
                original title of the documentary he made was "A Fighter Pilot's Story" (PBS
                may have changed it for their airing). Absolutely fascinating. He also was
                one of those interviewed for Ken Burns' "The War":

                http://www.pbs. org/thewar/ detail_5187. htm

                Amazing guy, even when he did the interviews for "The War", more than ten
                years after "An Airman's Story", his memory is a sharp as a tack and is, in
                my opinion, the best interviewee I have ever seen. And he was colorblind and
                thus should not have been a fighter pilot--he took the eye test enough times
                that he memorized it and passed.

                In trying to find a source for the documentary I discovered he had been a
                guest on Charlie Rose (a PBS talk show) but although I sometimes watch Rose,
                I didn't catch it the time Aanenson was on. From the Charlie Rose web site:

                Quentin C. Aanenson is a World War II veteran fighter pilot. He flew the
                P-47 "Thunderbolt" in the Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequently in the
                European campaign. Later in the war he was taken out of the cockpit,
                imbedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
                quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
                experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
                which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
                televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
                in June 1994. It is now available on DVD.

                From Wikipedia (I know, many people hate Wikipedia for information) :

                Quentin C. Aanenson (born April 21, 1921) is a World War II veteran fighter
                pilot and former Captain of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group,
                9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the
                Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequent European campaign.

                Aanenson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 but was not
                called up to active duty until February 1943. He left for Santa Ana Air
                Force Base for pre-flight training and then to Primary Flight School at
                Thunderbird Field near Phoenix, Arizona. In September 1943, he left for
                Basic Flight School at Gardner Field near Bakersfield, California. Aanenson
                then left for Advanced Flight Training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona where
                he was commissioned a second lieutenant on January 7, 1944. From January to
                May 1944, he trained at Harding Field in Baton Rogue, Louisiana where he met
                his wife Jackie [1].

                Aanenson demonstrated exceptional courage and ability as a fighter pilot,
                amassing tens of kills and beating all odds to survive the early months of
                his tour of duty.[2] Later in the war, Aanenson was taken out of the
                cockpit, embedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
                quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
                experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
                which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
                televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
                in June 1994. Up until August 2007, it was available for purchase on DVD.
                The three-hour documentary, made all the more effective by being narrated
                throughout in his flat, affectless voice, tells of a young, enthusiastic,
                cheery boy very rapidly aged by too much death. It also tells of a
                remarkably wide range of combat duties, and details many harrowing
                individual missions, like the one where he and his wing man came upon a
                German convoy, destroyed the vehicles, and when his wing man's guns jammed,
                how Aanenson worked-over the roadside ditches where the convoy soldiers had
                hidden, making multiple passes, "walking" his rudder to spread his fire more
                effectively, so that there would be as few survivors as possible.[3]

                The documentary also tells of a remarkable coincidence, where his P-47 was
                called down to assist some American troops under attack by a tank. He
                surveyed the scene, then reported to the troops that the tank was just too
                near, there was too much chance that he would hit them instead of the tank.
                The officer in command told him to come on in anyway, since they were going
                to be dead if the tank wasn't stopped. He managed to destroy the tank
                cleanly, then recounts how he was telling this story to his new neighbor
                after the war, and the man finished the story for him, then thanked him for
                saving his life.[4]

                The link for Wikipedia (there's more there):

                http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Quentin_C. _Aanenson

                Here's Aanenson's official web site:

                http://pages. prodigy.com/ fighterpilot/

                A note on the site states:

                Information about Documentary Orders
                Due to Mr. Aanenson's medical status, we regret that we will be unable to
                continue offering DVDs of his documentary, A Fighter Pilot's Story.

                No further details about his medical status. There is another page on the
                site that covers the making of the documentary and the aftermath, and that
                the DVD they used to offer had additional footage not seen in the
                documentary. Apparently the production was a family affair.

                The Washington Post did a lengthy article on him after "The War" debuted
                last year. It provides some additional details about the horrors of war that
                Aanenson has lived with ever since:

                http://tinyurl. com/5pxxnm

                Sincerely,

                Ray Merriam
                Owner
                Merriam Press
                133 Elm St Apt 3R
                Bennington VT 05201-2250 USA

                Phone: 802-447-0313
                E-mail: ray@merriam- press.com or merriampress@ comcast.net
                Web site: http://www.merriam- press.com

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
                Sent: Monday, 17 November 2008 10:05 PM
                Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                Lee and Ray,
                I once saw "An Airman's Story" on PBS and narrated by the pilot who flew the
                missions. It was about an hour program. Would like to see that film once
                more. It was a film of that airman's WWII missions over Germany. Each
                mission, he had a camera and filmed all his fights, and targets as he hit
                them, and included some footage of the 2 or 3 times he was shot down...he
                survived the war. In about 1995 or so, he found the film of his missions,
                now declassified, and had the movie made. It was awesome!
                Billy

                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Susan Cousens
                Hi Billy. Hurry up and get that book done, we want a signed copy! Maybe we could even come and collect it ourselves someday Sue.
                Message 7 of 14 , Nov 19, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Hi Billy.
                  Hurry up and get that book done, we want a signed copy! Maybe we could even come and collect it ourselves someday
                  Sue.




                  ________________________________
                  From: CHARLES RAY <charleswrayjr@...>
                  To: G104@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Tuesday, 18 November, 2008 21:44:32
                  Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found


                  Ray,
                  I have attended several reunions of my Dad's WWII outfit, the 777th Tank Battalion with the 69th Infantry Division.  Those men talked of the good old times but seldom did I hear them bring up what they did and saw during the war.  Not even when I posed the question.
                  When I saw "A Fighter Pilot's Story" I could understand better the pain of so many of the survivors who could not retell their experiences.  That PBS story sort of broke the ice. 
                  In 2000, Bill Sheavly, Jr, son of a WWII vet, put together a book "The Stories of Our War" which included interviews of the men of the 69th.
                  Some day, I'll complete "The Lucky Triple Sevens" and in it tell many of the stories they couldn't and tell didn't tell and back it all with hundreds of photos.
                  Billy Ray   

                  --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

                  From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
                  Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                  To: G104@yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 2:20 PM

                  Aanenson's story was that impressive that I remember it all these years
                  later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in
                  "The War." Found most of that stuff online, of course, and did it as much
                  for my own need to know as well as responding to your message. Plus the
                  aircraft and airwar of WWII are my personal specialty, even though almost
                  anything on WWII interests me.

                  Ray

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                  To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
                  Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:29 AM
                  Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                  Ray,
                  Thanks for the information. Could have been "A Fighter Pilot's Story." It
                  was long ago. You and Joe D'marco certainly are loaded with "the rest of the
                  story" as Paul would say. Glad both of you are here to put final touches on
                  the bits and pieces we know.
                  Billy Ray

                  --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

                  From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
                  Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                  To: G104@yahoogroups. com
                  Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 1:33 AM

                  You're talking about Quentin Aanenson, P-47 pilot, 391st Fighter Squadron,
                  366th Fighter Group. The film you're talking about was more than an hour
                  (shown over two nights the first time it aired, as I recall) and the
                  original title of the documentary he made was "A Fighter Pilot's Story" (PBS
                  may have changed it for their airing). Absolutely fascinating. He also was
                  one of those interviewed for Ken Burns' "The War":

                  http://www..pbs. org/thewar/ detail_5187. htm

                  Amazing guy, even when he did the interviews for "The War", more than ten
                  years after "An Airman's Story", his memory is a sharp as a tack and is, in
                  my opinion, the best interviewee I have ever seen. And he was colorblind and
                  thus should not have been a fighter pilot--he took the eye test enough times
                  that he memorized it and passed.

                  In trying to find a source for the documentary I discovered he had been a
                  guest on Charlie Rose (a PBS talk show) but although I sometimes watch Rose,
                  I didn't catch it the time Aanenson was on. From the Charlie Rose web site:

                  Quentin C. Aanenson is a World War II veteran fighter pilot. He flew the
                  P-47 "Thunderbolt" in the Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequently in the
                  European campaign. Later in the war he was taken out of the cockpit,
                  imbedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
                  quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
                  experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
                  which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
                  televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
                  in June 1994. It is now available on DVD.

                  From Wikipedia (I know, many people hate Wikipedia for information) :

                  Quentin C. Aanenson (born April 21, 1921) is a World War II veteran fighter
                  pilot and former Captain of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group,
                  9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the
                  Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequent European campaign.

                  Aanenson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 but was not
                  called up to active duty until February 1943. He left for Santa Ana Air
                  Force Base for pre-flight training and then to Primary Flight School at
                  Thunderbird Field near Phoenix, Arizona. In September 1943, he left for
                  Basic Flight School at Gardner Field near Bakersfield, California. Aanenson
                  then left for Advanced Flight Training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona where
                  he was commissioned a second lieutenant on January 7, 1944. From January to
                  May 1944, he trained at Harding Field in Baton Rogue, Louisiana where he met
                  his wife Jackie [1].

                  Aanenson demonstrated exceptional courage and ability as a fighter pilot,
                  amassing tens of kills and beating all odds to survive the early months of
                  his tour of duty.[2] Later in the war, Aanenson was taken out of the
                  cockpit, embedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
                  quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
                  experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
                  which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
                  televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
                  in June 1994. Up until August 2007, it was available for purchase on DVD.
                  The three-hour documentary, made all the more effective by being narrated
                  throughout in his flat, affectless voice, tells of a young, enthusiastic,
                  cheery boy very rapidly aged by too much death. It also tells of a
                  remarkably wide range of combat duties, and details many harrowing
                  individual missions, like the one where he and his wing man came upon a
                  German convoy, destroyed the vehicles, and when his wing man's guns jammed,
                  how Aanenson worked-over the roadside ditches where the convoy soldiers had
                  hidden, making multiple passes, "walking" his rudder to spread his fire more
                  effectively, so that there would be as few survivors as possible.[3]

                  The documentary also tells of a remarkable coincidence, where his P-47 was
                  called down to assist some American troops under attack by a tank. He
                  surveyed the scene, then reported to the troops that the tank was just too
                  near, there was too much chance that he would hit them instead of the tank.
                  The officer in command told him to come on in anyway, since they were going
                  to be dead if the tank wasn't stopped. He managed to destroy the tank
                  cleanly, then recounts how he was telling this story to his new neighbor
                  after the war, and the man finished the story for him, then thanked him for
                  saving his life.[4]

                  The link for Wikipedia (there's more there):

                  http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Quentin_C. _Aanenson

                  Here's Aanenson's official web site:

                  http://pages. prodigy.com/ fighterpilot/

                  A note on the site states:

                  Information about Documentary Orders
                  Due to Mr. Aanenson's medical status, we regret that we will be unable to
                  continue offering DVDs of his documentary, A Fighter Pilot's Story.

                  No further details about his medical status. There is another page on the
                  site that covers the making of the documentary and the aftermath, and that
                  the DVD they used to offer had additional footage not seen in the
                  documentary. Apparently the production was a family affair.

                  The Washington Post did a lengthy article on him after "The War" debuted
                  last year. It provides some additional details about the horrors of war that
                  Aanenson has lived with ever since:

                  http://tinyurl. com/5pxxnm

                  Sincerely,

                  Ray Merriam
                  Owner
                  Merriam Press
                  133 Elm St Apt 3R
                  Bennington VT 05201-2250 USA

                  Phone: 802-447-0313
                  E-mail: ray@merriam- press.com or merriampress@ comcast.net
                  Web site: http://www.merriam- press.com

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                  To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
                  Sent: Monday, 17 November 2008 10:05 PM
                  Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                  Lee and Ray,
                  I once saw "An Airman's Story" on PBS and narrated by the pilot who flew the
                  missions. It was about an hour program. Would like to see that film once
                  more. It was a film of that airman's WWII missions over Germany. Each
                  mission, he had a camera and filmed all his fights, and targets as he hit
                  them, and included some footage of the 2 or 3 times he was shot down...he
                  survived the war.. In about 1995 or so, he found the film of his missions,
                  now declassified, and had the movie made. It was awesome!
                  Billy

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                  ------------ --------- --------- ------

                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~
                  **Please trim your replies**
                  **Do not post in HTML or "Rich Text" mode**
                  **Plain ASCII Text only please**
                  **Attachments will be stripped**
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
                  Sherman Register
                  http://www.inter. nl.net/users/ spoelstra/ g104
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
                  G104 - the Sherman Register mailing list
                  http://groups. yahoo.com/ group/G104
                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~~~~~~~~ ~~
                  Yahoo! Groups Links

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • CHARLES RAY
                  Hi Sue, I am a letter perfect guy and I have been through the book hundreds of times, printed it out many times to see how it would look, added here and there,
                  Message 8 of 14 , Nov 19, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Hi Sue,
                    I am a letter perfect guy and I have been through the book hundreds of times, printed it out many times to see how it would look, added here and there, made some adjustments, added some references, and printed it out again.  I still don't have all the references so it is incomplete.
                    Don't know what else to do.  I am working on it today as I do most days.  Just can't seem to get it done.  I plan to add many photos, sent to me by the tankers, that help tell the story.  The Battalion group photos are complete except for 2 group photos from Fort Knox.
                    It is almost done.
                    Got to get ready for the Toyota Center...I volunteer to raise trip money for the band kids.  My son, Charles III, is a band student and they are going to Disney World in May 2009.
                    Billy

                    --- On Wed, 11/19/08, Susan Cousens <bob7bob78@...> wrote:

                    From: Susan Cousens <bob7bob78@...>
                    Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                    To: G104@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Wednesday, November 19, 2008, 11:32 AM






                    Hi Billy.
                    Hurry up and get that book done, we want a signed copy! Maybe we could even come and collect it ourselves someday
                    Sue.

                    ____________ _________ _________ __
                    From: CHARLES RAY <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                    To: G104@yahoogroups. com
                    Sent: Tuesday, 18 November, 2008 21:44:32
                    Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                    Ray,
                    I have attended several reunions of my Dad's WWII outfit, the 777th Tank Battalion with the 69th Infantry Division.  Those men talked of the good old times but seldom did I hear them bring up what they did and saw during the war.  Not even when I posed the question.
                    When I saw "A Fighter Pilot's Story" I could understand better the pain of so many of the survivors who could not retell their experiences.  That PBS story sort of broke the ice. 
                    In 2000, Bill Sheavly, Jr, son of a WWII vet, put together a book "The Stories of Our War" which included interviews of the men of the 69th.
                    Some day, I'll complete "The Lucky Triple Sevens" and in it tell many of the stories they couldn't and tell didn't tell and back it all with hundreds of photos.
                    Billy Ray   

                    --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

                    From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
                    Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                    To: G104@yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 2:20 PM

                    Aanenson's story was that impressive that I remember it all these years
                    later (and who could forget a name like that?!). And then he shows up in
                    "The War." Found most of that stuff online, of course, and did it as much
                    for my own need to know as well as responding to your message. Plus the
                    aircraft and airwar of WWII are my personal specialty, even though almost
                    anything on WWII interests me.

                    Ray

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                    To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
                    Sent: Tuesday, 18 November 2008 8:29 AM
                    Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                    Ray,
                    Thanks for the information. Could have been "A Fighter Pilot's Story." It
                    was long ago. You and Joe D'marco certainly are loaded with "the rest of the
                    story" as Paul would say. Glad both of you are here to put final touches on
                    the bits and pieces we know.
                    Billy Ray

                    --- On Tue, 11/18/08, Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net> wrote:

                    From: Ray Merriam <merriampress@ comcast.net>
                    Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found
                    To: G104@yahoogroups. com
                    Date: Tuesday, November 18, 2008, 1:33 AM

                    You're talking about Quentin Aanenson, P-47 pilot, 391st Fighter Squadron,
                    366th Fighter Group. The film you're talking about was more than an hour
                    (shown over two nights the first time it aired, as I recall) and the
                    original title of the documentary he made was "A Fighter Pilot's Story" (PBS
                    may have changed it for their airing). Absolutely fascinating. He also was
                    one of those interviewed for Ken Burns' "The War":

                    http://www.. pbs. org/thewar/ detail_5187. htm

                    Amazing guy, even when he did the interviews for "The War", more than ten
                    years after "An Airman's Story", his memory is a sharp as a tack and is, in
                    my opinion, the best interviewee I have ever seen. And he was colorblind and
                    thus should not have been a fighter pilot--he took the eye test enough times
                    that he memorized it and passed.

                    In trying to find a source for the documentary I discovered he had been a
                    guest on Charlie Rose (a PBS talk show) but although I sometimes watch Rose,
                    I didn't catch it the time Aanenson was on. From the Charlie Rose web site:

                    Quentin C. Aanenson is a World War II veteran fighter pilot. He flew the
                    P-47 "Thunderbolt" in the Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequently in the
                    European campaign. Later in the war he was taken out of the cockpit,
                    imbedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
                    quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
                    experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
                    which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
                    televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
                    in June 1994. It is now available on DVD.

                    From Wikipedia (I know, many people hate Wikipedia for information) :

                    Quentin C. Aanenson (born April 21, 1921) is a World War II veteran fighter
                    pilot and former Captain of the 391st Fighter Squadron, 366th Fighter Group,
                    9th Air Force, U.S. Army Air Corps. He flew the P-47 Thunderbolt in the
                    Normandy D-Day invasion and subsequent European campaign.

                    Aanenson enlisted in the United States Army Air Corps in 1942 but was not
                    called up to active duty until February 1943. He left for Santa Ana Air
                    Force Base for pre-flight training and then to Primary Flight School at
                    Thunderbird Field near Phoenix, Arizona. In September 1943, he left for
                    Basic Flight School at Gardner Field near Bakersfield, California. Aanenson
                    then left for Advanced Flight Training at Luke Field, Phoenix, Arizona where
                    he was commissioned a second lieutenant on January 7, 1944. From January to
                    May 1944, he trained at Harding Field in Baton Rogue, Louisiana where he met
                    his wife Jackie [1].

                    Aanenson demonstrated exceptional courage and ability as a fighter pilot,
                    amassing tens of kills and beating all odds to survive the early months of
                    his tour of duty.[2] Later in the war, Aanenson was taken out of the
                    cockpit, embedded with advance troops, and his skills put to good use as a
                    quick-response aircraft attack co-ordinator. He eventually documented his
                    experiences for his family. This was later turned into a documentary video
                    which he wrote, produced and narrated. "A Fighter Pilot's Story" was first
                    televised on 11/12/93, then broadcast on over 300 public television stations
                    in June 1994. Up until August 2007, it was available for purchase on DVD.
                    The three-hour documentary, made all the more effective by being narrated
                    throughout in his flat, affectless voice, tells of a young, enthusiastic,
                    cheery boy very rapidly aged by too much death. It also tells of a
                    remarkably wide range of combat duties, and details many harrowing
                    individual missions, like the one where he and his wing man came upon a
                    German convoy, destroyed the vehicles, and when his wing man's guns jammed,
                    how Aanenson worked-over the roadside ditches where the convoy soldiers had
                    hidden, making multiple passes, "walking" his rudder to spread his fire more
                    effectively, so that there would be as few survivors as possible.[3]

                    The documentary also tells of a remarkable coincidence, where his P-47 was
                    called down to assist some American troops under attack by a tank. He
                    surveyed the scene, then reported to the troops that the tank was just too
                    near, there was too much chance that he would hit them instead of the tank.
                    The officer in command told him to come on in anyway, since they were going
                    to be dead if the tank wasn't stopped. He managed to destroy the tank
                    cleanly, then recounts how he was telling this story to his new neighbor
                    after the war, and the man finished the story for him, then thanked him for
                    saving his life.[4]

                    The link for Wikipedia (there's more there):

                    http://en.wikipedia .org/wiki/ Quentin_C. _Aanenson

                    Here's Aanenson's official web site:

                    http://pages. prodigy.com/ fighterpilot/

                    A note on the site states:

                    Information about Documentary Orders
                    Due to Mr. Aanenson's medical status, we regret that we will be unable to
                    continue offering DVDs of his documentary, A Fighter Pilot's Story.

                    No further details about his medical status. There is another page on the
                    site that covers the making of the documentary and the aftermath, and that
                    the DVD they used to offer had additional footage not seen in the
                    documentary. Apparently the production was a family affair.

                    The Washington Post did a lengthy article on him after "The War" debuted
                    last year. It provides some additional details about the horrors of war that
                    Aanenson has lived with ever since:

                    http://tinyurl. com/5pxxnm

                    Sincerely,

                    Ray Merriam
                    Owner
                    Merriam Press
                    133 Elm St Apt 3R
                    Bennington VT 05201-2250 USA

                    Phone: 802-447-0313
                    E-mail: ray@merriam- press.com or merriampress@ comcast.net
                    Web site: http://www.merriam- press.com

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@ prodigy.net>
                    To: <G104@yahoogroups. com>
                    Sent: Monday, 17 November 2008 10:05 PM
                    Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found

                    Lee and Ray,
                    I once saw "An Airman's Story" on PBS and narrated by the pilot who flew the
                    missions. It was about an hour program. Would like to see that film once
                    more. It was a film of that airman's WWII missions over Germany. Each
                    mission, he had a camera and filmed all his fights, and targets as he hit
                    them, and included some footage of the 2 or 3 times he was shot down...he
                    survived the war.. In about 1995 or so, he found the film of his missions,
                    now declassified, and had the movie made. It was awesome!
                    Billy

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                  • Ray Merriam
                    Hi Billy, The only medal my father actually had was the Good Conduct Medal. I checked the American Campaign Medal and found this: The American Campaign Medal
                    Message 9 of 14 , Nov 19, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Hi Billy,

                      The only medal my father actually had was the Good Conduct Medal. I checked
                      the American Campaign Medal and found this:

                      The American Campaign Medal was a military decoration of the United States
                      armed forces which was first created on November 6, 1942 by Executive Order
                      9265 issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Originally issued as the
                      "American Theater Ribbon", the decoration was intended to recognize those
                      service members who had performed duty in the American Theater of Operations
                      during World War II.

                      To be awarded the American Campaign Medal, a service member was required to
                      either perform one year of consecutive duty within the continental borders
                      of the United States, or perform 30 days consecutive/60 non-consecutive days
                      of duty outside the borders of the United States but within the American
                      Theater of Operations. The American Theater was defined as the entirety of
                      the United States to include most of the Atlantic Ocean, a portion of Alaska
                      [I would guess it doesn't include the Aleutians. --Ray], and a small portion
                      of the Pacific bordering California and Baja California.

                      The eligibility dates of the American Campaign Medal were from December 7,
                      1941 to March 2, 1946. Service stars were authorized to any service member
                      who was engaged in actual combat with Axis forces within the American
                      theater. This primarily applied to those members of the military which had
                      engaged in anti-U-Boat patrols in the Atlantic.

                      The American Campaign Medal was issued as a ribbon for the entirety of the
                      Second World War, and was only made a full sized medal in 1947. The first
                      recipient of the American Campaign Medal was General of the Army George C.
                      Marshall.

                      Another source specified the criteria for award of the medal:

                      3. Criteria:

                      a. The American Campaign Medal was awarded to personnel for service within
                      the American Theater between 7 December 1941 and 2 March 1946 under any of
                      the following conditions.

                      (1) On permanent assignment outside the continental limits of the United
                      States.

                      (2) Permanently assigned as a member of a crew of a vessel sailing ocean
                      waters for a period of 30 days or 60 nonconsecutive days.

                      (3) Permanently assigned as a member of an operating crew of an airplane
                      actually making regular and frequent flights over ocean waters for a period
                      of 30 days.

                      (4) Outside the continental limits of the United States in a passenger
                      status or on temporary duty for 30 consecutive days or 60 days not
                      consecutive.

                      (5) In active combat against the enemy and was awarded a combat decoration
                      or furnished a certificate by the commanding general of a corps, higher
                      unit, or independent force that he actually participated in combat.

                      (6) Within the continental limits of the United States for an aggregate
                      period of one year.

                      b. The eastern boundary of the American Theater is from the North Pole,
                      south along the 75th meridian west longitude to the 77th parallel north
                      latitude, then southeast through Davis Strait to the intersection of the
                      40th parallel north latitude and the 35th meridian west longitude, then
                      south along the meridian to the 10th parallel north latitude, then southeast
                      to the intersection of the Equator and the 20th meridian west longitude,
                      then south along the 20th meridian west longitude to the South Pole. The
                      western boundary is from the North Pole, south along the 141st meridian west
                      longitude to the east boundary of Alaska, then south and southeast along the
                      Alaska boundary to the Pacific Ocean, then south along the 130th meridian to
                      its intersection with the 30th parallel north latitude, then southeast to
                      the intersection of the Equator and the 100th meridian west longitude to the
                      South Pole. The American Theater included North America (excluding Alaska)
                      and South America.

                      If he didn't qualify for the American Campaign Medal, then he should have
                      qualified for the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal:

                      3. Criteria: a. The Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal was awarded to personnel
                      for service within the Asiatic-Pacific Theater between 7 December 1941 and 2
                      March 1946 under any of the following conditions:

                      (1) On permanent assignment. [This would be where he would qualify,
                      as I believe he spent most of the war in the Aleutians. --Ray]

                      (2) In a passenger status or on temporary duty for 30 consecutive
                      days or 60 days not consecutive.

                      (3) In active combat against the enemy and was awarded a combat
                      decoration or furnished a certificate by the commanding general of a corps,
                      higher unit, or independent force that he actually participated in combat.

                      b. The eastern boundary of the Asiatic-Pacific Theater is from the North
                      Pole, south along the 141st meridian west longitude to the east boundary of
                      Alaska, then south and southeast along the Alaska boundary to the Pacific
                      Ocean, then south along the 130th meridian to its intersection with the 30th
                      parallel north latitude, then southeast to the intersection of the Equator
                      and the 100th meridian west longitude, then to the South Pole. The western
                      boundary of the Asiatic-Pacific Theater is from the North Pole south along
                      the 60th meridian east longitude to its intersection with the east boundary
                      of Iran, then south along the Iran boundary to the Gulf of Oman and the
                      intersection of the 60th meridian east longitude, then south along the 60th
                      meridian east longitude to the South Pole. The Asiatic-Pacific Theater
                      included Alaska, Hawaii, Philippines, Australia, New Zealand, and all of
                      Asia.

                      ... and ...

                      d. A bronze star is worn on the ribbon to indicate participation in
                      designated campaigns. The designated campaigns for the Asiatic-Pacific
                      Theater and inscriptions used on the Army Flag streamer set are:

                      Aleutian Islands 3 Jun 42 - 24 Aug 43

                      I only listed the Aleutian Islands here but there were 24 Asiatic-Pacific
                      campaigns in all.

                      When he died in 1982, I tried to get his service records and was informed
                      that they were lost in the 1973 fire in St. Louis. I found his enlistment
                      record online last year which provided some interesting information about
                      him that I never knew before, such as where he lived when he enlisted.

                      Ray


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "CHARLES RAY" <charleswrayjr@...>
                      To: <G104@yahoogroups.com>
                      Sent: Wednesday, 19 November 2008 4:16 AM
                      Subject: Re: [G104] Never Before Seen World War II Film Footage Found


                      Ray,
                      Were the men in the Aleutians awarded the American Campaign medal? Seems
                      that even though you Dad saw no combat, the medal should still be
                      appropriate.

                      Billy
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