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Comb on APG's M40 GMC...

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  • Neil Baumgardner
    Made another trip up to APG this past weekend to take part in some tours Bob was organizing (highly recommended!). Only one real Sherman related item of note,
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 19, 2005
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      Made another trip up to APG this past weekend to take part in some
      tours Bob was organizing (highly recommended!). Only one real Sherman
      related item of note, I noticed the museum's M40 has a comb... I
      noticed the Sherman register file doesnt mention combs being on M40s
      (although it does many other Sherman variants).
      http://www.afvnews.ca/cgi-bin/web-bbs/webbbs_config.pl/read/68175

      Would it simply be a holdover from the Sherman hull? Doesnt seem to be
      useful for transmission tie-down without the MG port to go through...
      Where else would it (tie-down) run to?

      Neil
    • Bob Smart
      ... I don t think it would be a hold over for a couple reasons 1) I though the M-40s were new purposebuilt hulls so there wouldn t be much chance of a
      Message 2 of 6 , Sep 19, 2005
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        At 08:27 PM 9/19/2005 -0000, you wrote:
        >
        >Would it simply be a holdover from the Sherman hull? Doesnt seem to be
        >useful for transmission tie-down without the MG port to go through...
        >Where else would it (tie-down) run to?
        >
        >Neil

        I don't think it would be a hold over for a couple reasons

        1) I though the M-40s were new purposebuilt hulls so there wouldn't be much
        chance of a 'holdover'

        2) It appears to be on th edriver side of the hull all the combs I remember
        seeing on other varients have been on the co-driver side.

        I was wondering how it would be used on that hull and thought maybe there
        is a periscope mount it could run through. I'll have to look at it on my
        next trip

        Bob Smart (bsmart@...)
      • Neil Baumgardner
        ... to be ... through... ... be much ... remember ... there ... on my ... On the M7 Priest the brake release cable runs from the comb into the interior under
        Message 3 of 6 , Sep 19, 2005
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          --- In G104@yahoogroups.com, Bob Smart <bsmart@m...> wrote:
          > At 08:27 PM 9/19/2005 -0000, you wrote:
          > >
          > >Would it simply be a holdover from the Sherman hull? Doesnt seem
          to be
          > >useful for transmission tie-down without the MG port to go
          through...
          > >Where else would it (tie-down) run to?
          > >
          > >Neil
          >
          > I don't think it would be a hold over for a couple reasons
          >
          > 1) I though the M-40s were new purposebuilt hulls so there wouldn't
          be much
          > chance of a 'holdover'
          >
          > 2) It appears to be on th edriver side of the hull all the combs I
          remember
          > seeing on other varients have been on the co-driver side.
          >
          > I was wondering how it would be used on that hull and thought maybe
          there
          > is a periscope mount it could run through. I'll have to look at it
          on my
          > next trip

          On the M7 Priest the brake release cable runs from the comb into the
          interior under the gun mount. I was thinking maybe it was something
          similiar for the M40?

          Neil
        • Joe DeMarco
          ... The method used on Shermans by the Ford operated depots is described in the Chester Depot Directive. The cable was attached to each steering or brake
          Message 4 of 6 , Sep 24, 2005
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            >all the combs I remember seeing on other varients have been on the
            >co-driver side.

            The method used on Shermans by the Ford operated depots is
            described in the Chester Depot Directive.
            The cable was attached to each steering or brake lever, then it was
            threaded through a pulley on the interior, then out through a wooden plug
            in the bow mg port, & attached to the locking device, that they called
            a "pawl." There should be a pulley or something inside vehicles with combs,
            although, AFAIK, no one has ever posted a photo of the interior fitting(s)
            on a surviving tank. Have any owners noticed anything like that?

            (In the fine photo book, "Images of War" the author has included photos
            of a couple M4A4s that were part of a late 1942 experimental trans-Atlantic
            shipment that explored the best means for sealing tanks.
            His explanation of the comb's purpose can be ignored.)

            The Directive mentions an alternate method to be used on vehicles
            without a bow mg, such as M7s & M10s:
            "Other type tanks require the removal of a bolt in the hull,
            utilizing the bolt hole."
            Did Bob's APG tour include the storage yard on Bel Air St. with the
            M3A5 Lee? On that, the comb is mounted on the middle section
            of the diff housing, & the cable would pass through one of the diff's bolt
            holes. There's a small roller fitting just in front of the open bolt hole.

            Another method of locking the brakes used a simple eyebolt & turnbuckle.
            There are also quite a few surviving Shermans with a more elaborate hinged
            comb on the driver's side. This setup may have involved running the cable
            through a slightly ajar (but sealed) driver's hatch? Periscope aperture?

            A certain amount of pushing & pulling was necessary to position a tank
            on the deck or in the hold of a ship, & it's mentioned that the stevedores
            often broke the sealant to enter the tank to release the brakes, because
            they did not trust the puny looking cable system to control a 30 ton
            vehicle. This, of course, defeated the purpose of sealing the tank.
            The stevedores were also reluctant to utilize the lifting rings on
            the upper hulls, & often slug cables under the tank to lift it.
            This could result in damage, & later Shermans can be seen with
            "Lift Here" stenciled near the lifting rings.

            For domestic shipments, that didn't require all the sealing goop, the
            Directive calls for the use of notched 2x4s, wedged to set & hold the
            brakes.

            Joe
          • Kurt Laughlin
            ... From: Joe DeMarco To: G104 Sent: Saturday, September 24, 2005 9:37 AM Subject: [G104] Re: Comb on APG s M40 GMC... The Directive mentions an alternate
            Message 5 of 6 , Sep 24, 2005
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              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Joe DeMarco
              To: G104
              Sent: Saturday, September 24, 2005 9:37 AM
              Subject: [G104] Re: Comb on APG's M40 GMC...

              The Directive mentions an alternate method to be used on vehicles
              without a bow mg, such as M7s & M10s:
              "Other type tanks require the removal of a bolt in the hull,
              utilizing the bolt hole."

              KL> On M36s the pawl was mounted on top of the turret counterweight. This
              would allow direct tension on the steering levers without a 180-degree bend
              in the cable.

              The stevedores were also reluctant to utilize the lifting rings on
              the upper hulls, & often slug cables under the tank to lift it.
              This could result in damage, & later Shermans can be seen with
              "Lift Here" stenciled near the lifting rings.

              KL> The TB incorporating the marking implies that they were also trying to
              lift the entire tank using the turret lift rings.

              KL
            • Hanno Spoelstra
              ... All I have seen is a rough sketch, but David Herbert recalls seeing a small pulley behind the driver inside a Sherman and wondering what on earth that was
              Message 6 of 6 , Sep 26, 2005
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                At 09:37 24-9-2005 -0400, Joe DeMarco wrote:
                >The method used on Shermans by the Ford operated depots is
                >described in the Chester Depot Directive.
                >The cable was attached to each steering or brake lever, then it was
                >threaded through a pulley on the interior, then out through a wooden plug
                >in the bow mg port, & attached to the locking device, that they called
                >a "pawl." There should be a pulley or something inside vehicles with combs,
                >although, AFAIK, no one has ever posted a photo of the interior fitting(s)
                >on a surviving tank. Have any owners noticed anything like that?

                All I have seen is a rough sketch, but David Herbert recalls seeing a small
                pulley behind the driver inside a Sherman and wondering what on earth that
                was doing there. It would take many years before he found the answer in the
                National Archives in Ottawa, Canada:
                http://web.inter.nl.net/users/spoelstra/g104/comb.htm

                Hanno
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