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[G104] Final drive Housing & Goderich, OP

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  • Joe DeMarco
    Hi Jim (rrunnersb), I ve been looking through some more photos, & the evidence looks pretty good that the 7 little plates cast into, & running across the top
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 13, 2004
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      Hi Jim (rrunnersb),

      I've been looking through some more photos, & the evidence looks
      pretty good that the 7 little plates cast into, & running across the top
      of the diff housing, was an exclusive feature of the final batch of
      castings (batch D) produced by American Steel Foundries/Granite City.
      I think these were delivered starting in the second quarter of 1945.
      Here's another example seen on the M4A1 in Pierre, SD.
      The serial number of the diff on this one is 409.

      http://66.231.25.91/m4a1/M4a1-24-DSC01081.JPG

      http://66.231.25.91/m4a1/M4a1-17-DSC01089.JPG

      A friend called me on his cell while looking at this, but despite
      "our" best efforts, "we" could not find evidence of the tank's
      serial or registration number.

      Due to the highest diff. serial number seen, I looked around to
      see if these might also be found on some late production welded
      hull Shermans, M40s, & such.
      They are heavily painted, but the "plated diffs." appear
      in a few of my pix of Fisher-built M4A2(76)s in Canada.
      (Goderich looks like it might have one; definitely on the one
      in St. Thomas, O.P.)
      I've been hoping one of the 21 M4A2(76)HVSS's made by
      Pressed Steel Car will turn up in Canada. If it ever does,
      I would expect it would have one of these diffs, as well as a
      Union Steel turret.

      Mr. Rutledge,

      Regarding the M4A2(76)HVSS at the Huron County Museum in Goderich,
      it looked perfectly presentable when I visited it in 1999.
      Sorry to hear if it has deteriorated in some way.
      If RCL 109 is thinking of trying to get it in running condition,
      that might be a challenge.
      The engines have been removed from most of the monument Shermans
      I've visited up in Canada, including that one, IIRC.
      Moving it to put it on a trailer might break the tracks or damage some of
      the tires...
      That happened on some of the tanks at APG when they moved 'em.

      The marker placed by RCL 109 dedicated the Sherman to all Allied Tank crews,
      & Major David Currie in particular.
      It described it as "Sherman 78-901."
      I would assume 78-901 is the Cdn. DND Number assigned to that tank at
      the time it was purchased from the US in 1946.
      FWIW, I recorded the US serial number as 65017.
      Surviving Shermans are scattered all over the world, but that one is not too
      far from where it was made in Grand Blanc (Flint), Michigan.

      Joe
    • rrunnersb@aol.com
      Thanks for info Joe. Thats a funny looking comb on that final drive? My casting is very clean. If it was just a bit better one could almost make out words on
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 14, 2004
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        Thanks for info Joe. Thats a funny looking comb on that final drive? My casting is very clean. If it was just a bit better one could almost make out words on those tags. Maybe someday some free internet imagining software could put the pieces together and show us exactly what they looked like when pressed into the sand casting. Drives me crazy every time I look at it.

        Of all the manufactures it seems to me the least publicity during the War was for the Pressed Steelcar Co. Any idea why? The American Steel foundry, does it still exsist in any form? Another unsolved mystery. At, least until Joe figures it out for us all.

        Thanks again,

        Jim
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