Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

British Sherman mileage classifications

Expand Messages
  • Peter Brown
    Included in the Army Council Instructions, which covered all manner of general orders for the British Army, is a series which class vehicles by their
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 2, 2002
    • 0 Attachment
      Included in the Army Council Instructions, which covered all manner of general orders for the British Army, is a series which class vehicles by their usability. There were five classes -

      Class I - fit for active service or can be made so, up to a specified mileage

      Class II - fit for active service or can be made so, up to a specified mileage greater than Class I

      Class III - vehicle in good running order or can be made so by 1st Echelon repair, with mileage greater than Class II

      Class IV - not in Classes I-III but can be brought up to standard by 2nd Echelon repair

      Class V - not in Classes I-III but can be brought up to standard by 3nd Echelon repair

      Class VI - beyond economical repair

      The lists of vehicles types varied from time to time, as did the mileages for Classes I and II

      On 1st September 1943, Shermans appear with mileage limits of 1000 for Class I and 2000 for Class II

      By 14th May 1944, the types in use were more complicated, thus -

      Sherman I, II and sub-marks, Lee, Grant - 800 and 1600

      Sherman III, IV, V and sub-marks - 1250 and 2250

      Also, as tracked self-propelled artillery,

      105mm M7 and 25pdr Ram - 800 and 1600

      3-inch M10 - 1250 and 2250


      By 11th December 1945, this has been simplified to be -

      Sherman (All Types), Lee, Grant as well as 105mm M7, 3-inch & 17-pr M10, 25pdr Ram were now all - Class I 1250 and Class II 2250


      Note that Sherman IV or M4A3 are included in the May 1944 list, though Britain only received token quantities. "sub-marks" will include things like the 17pdr Firefly, any 105mm gun armed tanks, Duplex Drive, Observation and Command Post tanks, Crab Flails and Armoured Recovery Vehicles as appropriate to each Mark.

      The differences in mileages are interesting with the M4A2 Sherman III, GM Diesel, M4A3 Sherman IV Ford GAA and M4A4 Sherman V Chrysler Multibank versions being considered more reliable that the M4 Sherman I and M4A1 Sherman II and the M7 and Ram-based radial-engined versions while all Lees and Grants were classed the same regardless on engine carried. Why this difference was no longer thought necessary by the end of 1945 is almost as interesting!


      Self-propelled guns are not referred to by their colloquial names, Priest for the M7 and Sexton for 25pdr Ram, and M10s are M10s sub-divided by gun type.


      ---
      Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
      Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
      Version: 6.0.408 / Virus Database: 230 - Release Date: 24/10/2002



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.