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response to Ten Houten and Chicago

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  • wj2a2@netzero.net
    Dear List, Chicago is where my name bearers entered this country but I know little about the area. My part of the family moved north to Michigan and then east
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 1, 2003
      Dear List,

      Chicago is where my name bearers entered this country but I know little
      about the area. My part of the family moved north to Michigan and then
      east to New York. Many of the traditional Dutch areas in Chicago and
      other northern cities collapsed as Blacks moved in in the 1970's.

      Here are some quotes from from Frisians to AMerica by Gallema, section
      on "Frisian immigrants and the American metropole: Chicago".

      "..Among the Hollanders in Chicago in 1900 I was able to locate 469
      Frisian born or of Frisian descent. Most of them lived in the southern
      suburb of Roseland, which was founded by immigrants from Noord-Holland.
      The origin of these Frisians was randomly distributed over the clay
      municipalities, although the share of Wonseradeel was very low. The
      village of Ee in Oostdongeradeel provided 20 people to Chicago between
      1880 - 1900. Seventy-six northern Frisian households could be
      linked...."
      (My note: obviously she missed the 2 or 3 generations of my family who
      emigrated from Ie/Ee in the 1870's, we provided at least 8 persons.)

      "...Van Hinte speaks highly of the Frisian acumen for business.
      Occupationally, the northern Frisians in Chicago in 1900 showed a well
      known pattern. Menial unskilled and semiskilled jobs prevailed. Some 24
      percent were truck farmers. Compared to the figures for Paterson (New
      Jersey), this percentage is quite high. This was due to the fact that
      Roseland was an outskirts truck farming village, which was connected to
      Chicago in the first decade after 1900. Most of the agricultural work of
      the Frisians was in the vicinity of Chicago, in the southern suburb of
      Roseland. Around the turn of the century Roseland was the garden center
      of the city of Chicago, although the huge city was rapidly
      encroaching...
      (My note: my understanding of "truck farming" is farming for sale in a
      nearby big city, load up your crops and take them to market. Truck
      farming probably originated with farmers taking their goods to market by
      wagon or train in earlier years. In my childhood we had the Berlin,
      Camden, and Columbus (New Jersey) Farmers' Markets where farmers drove
      to market and sold their goods literally from the backs of their trucks
      during the weekend. Kansas City today has a smaller version of the same
      thing. I talked to a man who sold "Belgian Blue" beef and drove 2 hours
      from central Missouri.)

      "...George Pullman had founded his shop in 1880 in PUllman, a few miles
      east of Roseland. Pullman provided jobs for the Dutch over a long
      period, among them many northern Frisians...." (My note: PUllman was
      known for his "palace (rail) cars", luxurious "sleeper" cars, and cars
      that he custom built for the wealthy.)

      There is a footnote from one of the sections that I just quoted. "A
      Groninger Hoek existed on the west side of Chicago. See H. Krabbendam,
      'The West Side Dutch in Chicago', Origins 9 (1991) 2:4-8, H. Stob,
      'Henry Stob', Origins 9 (1991), 2:9-17; H. Stob, 'Church and School on
      Chicago's West Side 1913-1921', Origins 10 (1992) 2:14-19, and Origins
      11 (1993) 1:24-29; R.P. Swierenga, 'Chicago's Groninger Hoek: the
      Origins and Development of the Dutch Colony on the 'Old West Side' in
      the Nineteenth Century' (paper delivered at the University of Groningen,
      1988).

      Swierenga is a premier ethnic researcher in America. He was the first to
      use computers (main frames) in the 1970's to track Netherlandic
      migration across the U.S. Galema studied under Swierenga at one point.
      You might try contacting Galema at the university in Groningen to see if
      she ran across the name "ten Houten". She says that she has more
      information on the Dutch in Chicago.

      There are/were other Dutch settlements on the western and southern
      suburbs of Chicago, no doubt other areas. Chicago is a railroad city so
      look for settlements on rail lines. My family settled in South Holland,
      south of the city, called by other names in earlier years. "South" was
      added to the name to distinguish it from Holland, Michigan, although
      there was a South Holland briefly in Michigan as well.

      Here's another thought, how to locate Dutch settlements of the past. The
      Christian Reformed Church's yearbook (of congregations) prints a map of
      each classis showing where member congregations are located. I used to
      have them all from 1972 forward but tossed them when I moved to
      Missouri. Too bad, but Heritage Hall at Calvin College and other C.R.C.
      institutions should have back issues. Contact Heritage Hall and ask them
      where the Dutch centers were in Chicago and suggest using old yearbooks
      to pin point where congregations were located in the belief that they
      would be in the Dutch centers.

      Since the race problems of the 1960's you've had "White flight" and with
      that congregations moving out, merging, or dissolving. Sadly, South
      Holland is now predominately Black (60%) so what happened 30+ years ago
      in Chicago is happening again. In the early 1990's it was becoming
      Polish Catholic but something changed. Many Black parents had their
      children in the South Holland schools illegally in order to get them out
      of the Chicago schools. To be legal they'd have to be residents, so
      they're very legal now.

      As to tracking down the individuals you may have to resort to the U.S.
      census. It's probably on microfiche, not online. The Detroit public
      library has all the U.S. census from the very first one forward on
      microfiche. I spent some time there a few years ago using such to
      research long gone Dutch communities in upstate New York. Other big city
      libraries will have this as well. If the census was taken like it is now
      a days, big cities will be divided into, I'll say "routes" as I am
      having a mental lapse, census taker "routes". To find these people in
      Chicago you would need to know what "route" they were on.

      The Detroit Public Library has a surprising number of resources for
      exploring ethnic heritage. Those within a few hours drive should look
      into using such.

      Regards,

      Walt Aardsma





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    • AE Palmer
      ... It is obvious the the book you quote is very informative and extensive, Does it have any information about Frisians immigrating to Upstate New York State?
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 1, 2003
        on 1-1-2003 03:21 pm, wj2a2@... at wj2a2@... wrote in part:

        > Here are some quotes from from Frisians to AMerica by Gallema, section
        > on "Frisian immigrants and the American metropole: Chicago".

        It is obvious the the book you quote is very informative and extensive, Does
        it have any information about Frisians immigrating to Upstate New York
        State?

        Thanks so much and Happy New Year
        --
        <><><><><><><><><><><>
        Arrowhead Images
        <aepalmer@...>
        <><><><><><><><><><><>
        Researching:
        Maine & New Brunswick: RIDEOUT € LEYDECKER € HUGHES
        NYS & Nederlands: DeJONG € SIEDSMA
        Germany & France: TRAUTMAN € METZGER
      • Mike Hoekstra <carpenoctem1970@yahoo.com>
        Also check out Swierenga s new book Dutch Chicago . My family also came from Ee in 1884 along with brothers of my ancestor ... all came between 1882 and 1889
        Message 3 of 3 , Jan 23, 2003
          Also check out Swierenga's new book "Dutch Chicago". My family also
          came from Ee in 1884 along with brothers of my ancestor ... all came
          between 1882 and 1889 to Roseland , one brother to Grand Rapids.

          Mike Hoekstra

          --- In Friesland-genealogy@yahoogroups.com, wj2a2@n... wrote:
          > Dear List,
          >
          > Chicago is where my name bearers entered this country but I know
          little
          > about the area. My part of the family moved north to Michigan and
          then
          > east to New York. Many of the traditional Dutch areas in Chicago and
          > other northern cities collapsed as Blacks moved in in the 1970's.
          >
          > Here are some quotes from from Frisians to AMerica by Gallema,
          section
          > on "Frisian immigrants and the American metropole: Chicago".
          >
          > "..Among the Hollanders in Chicago in 1900 I was able to locate 469
          > Frisian born or of Frisian descent. Most of them lived in the
          southern
          > suburb of Roseland, which was founded by immigrants from Noord-
          Holland.
          > The origin of these Frisians was randomly distributed over the clay
          > municipalities, although the share of Wonseradeel was very low. The
          > village of Ee in Oostdongeradeel provided 20 people to Chicago
          between
          > 1880 - 1900. Seventy-six northern Frisian households could be
          > linked...."
          > (My note: obviously she missed the 2 or 3 generations of my family
          who
          > emigrated from Ie/Ee in the 1870's, we provided at least 8 persons.)
          >
          > "...Van Hinte speaks highly of the Frisian acumen for business.
          > Occupationally, the northern Frisians in Chicago in 1900 showed a
          well
          > known pattern. Menial unskilled and semiskilled jobs prevailed.
          Some 24
          > percent were truck farmers. Compared to the figures for Paterson
          (New
          > Jersey), this percentage is quite high. This was due to the fact
          that
          > Roseland was an outskirts truck farming village, which was
          connected to
          > Chicago in the first decade after 1900. Most of the agricultural
          work of
          > the Frisians was in the vicinity of Chicago, in the southern suburb
          of
          > Roseland. Around the turn of the century Roseland was the garden
          center
          > of the city of Chicago, although the huge city was rapidly
          > encroaching...
          > (My note: my understanding of "truck farming" is farming for sale
          in a
          > nearby big city, load up your crops and take them to market. Truck
          > farming probably originated with farmers taking their goods to
          market by
          > wagon or train in earlier years. In my childhood we had the Berlin,
          > Camden, and Columbus (New Jersey) Farmers' Markets where farmers
          drove
          > to market and sold their goods literally from the backs of their
          trucks
          > during the weekend. Kansas City today has a smaller version of the
          same
          > thing. I talked to a man who sold "Belgian Blue" beef and drove 2
          hours
          > from central Missouri.)
          >
          > "...George Pullman had founded his shop in 1880 in PUllman, a few
          miles
          > east of Roseland. Pullman provided jobs for the Dutch over a long
          > period, among them many northern Frisians...." (My note: PUllman was
          > known for his "palace (rail) cars", luxurious "sleeper" cars, and
          cars
          > that he custom built for the wealthy.)
          >
          > There is a footnote from one of the sections that I just quoted. "A
          > Groninger Hoek existed on the west side of Chicago. See H.
          Krabbendam,
          > 'The West Side Dutch in Chicago', Origins 9 (1991) 2:4-8, H. Stob,
          > 'Henry Stob', Origins 9 (1991), 2:9-17; H. Stob, 'Church and School
          on
          > Chicago's West Side 1913-1921', Origins 10 (1992) 2:14-19, and
          Origins
          > 11 (1993) 1:24-29; R.P. Swierenga, 'Chicago's Groninger Hoek: the
          > Origins and Development of the Dutch Colony on the 'Old West Side'
          in
          > the Nineteenth Century' (paper delivered at the University of
          Groningen,
          > 1988).
          >
          > Swierenga is a premier ethnic researcher in America. He was the
          first to
          > use computers (main frames) in the 1970's to track Netherlandic
          > migration across the U.S. Galema studied under Swierenga at one
          point.
          > You might try contacting Galema at the university in Groningen to
          see if
          > she ran across the name "ten Houten". She says that she has more
          > information on the Dutch in Chicago.
          >
          > There are/were other Dutch settlements on the western and southern
          > suburbs of Chicago, no doubt other areas. Chicago is a railroad
          city so
          > look for settlements on rail lines. My family settled in South
          Holland,
          > south of the city, called by other names in earlier years. "South"
          was
          > added to the name to distinguish it from Holland, Michigan, although
          > there was a South Holland briefly in Michigan as well.
          >
          > Here's another thought, how to locate Dutch settlements of the
          past. The
          > Christian Reformed Church's yearbook (of congregations) prints a
          map of
          > each classis showing where member congregations are located. I used
          to
          > have them all from 1972 forward but tossed them when I moved to
          > Missouri. Too bad, but Heritage Hall at Calvin College and other
          C.R.C.
          > institutions should have back issues. Contact Heritage Hall and ask
          them
          > where the Dutch centers were in Chicago and suggest using old
          yearbooks
          > to pin point where congregations were located in the belief that
          they
          > would be in the Dutch centers.
          >
          > Since the race problems of the 1960's you've had "White flight" and
          with
          > that congregations moving out, merging, or dissolving. Sadly, South
          > Holland is now predominately Black (60%) so what happened 30+ years
          ago
          > in Chicago is happening again. In the early 1990's it was becoming
          > Polish Catholic but something changed. Many Black parents had their
          > children in the South Holland schools illegally in order to get
          them out
          > of the Chicago schools. To be legal they'd have to be residents, so
          > they're very legal now.
          >
          > As to tracking down the individuals you may have to resort to the
          U.S.
          > census. It's probably on microfiche, not online. The Detroit public
          > library has all the U.S. census from the very first one forward on
          > microfiche. I spent some time there a few years ago using such to
          > research long gone Dutch communities in upstate New York. Other big
          city
          > libraries will have this as well. If the census was taken like it
          is now
          > a days, big cities will be divided into, I'll say "routes" as I am
          > having a mental lapse, census taker "routes". To find these people
          in
          > Chicago you would need to know what "route" they were on.
          >
          > The Detroit Public Library has a surprising number of resources for
          > exploring ethnic heritage. Those within a few hours drive should
          look
          > into using such.
          >
          > Regards,
          >
          > Walt Aardsma
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------------------
          > Introducing NetZero Long Distance
          > 1st month Free!
          > Sign up today at: www.netzerolongdistance.com
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