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Razor suitable for first build?

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  • matt.haugh
    I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a pair of Footy
    Message 1 of 8 , Mar 7 4:13 PM
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      I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a pair of Footy boats with my favorite shop buddy, my nine-year-old son. We're looking forward to tweaking and racing whatever we build, and we want them to be identical (ish) so the emphasis will be on boat handling. I'm an experienced scale aircraft builder, so tools and materials are in plentiful supply.

      Razor a good first choice? Is there another design that would be "better" in terms of either build simplicity or performance? (Please, no bottles, we want to display our creations in the house and my wife is a big fan of "cute" so these boats need to look the part.)

      Anyone think a kit would be a better choice? (Kit makers are slow to get back to me, so I fear they're not cutting any longer.)

      Is there an ultimate tips-n-tricks thread somewhere that can help us avoid common pitfalls? I've read a few threads, but they're all over the map.

      Thanks for whatever light y'all can shed. We're looking forward to digging in!

      Last question: if we do a build log, where's the best forum in terms of sharing and getting advice from experienced builders.

      Oh hell, one more thing, we are surrounded by saltwater. This affects material choices, yes?

      Matt
    • Al Szymanski
      Hey Matt, I can not address the Razor. However I can address the salt water. I too, live surrounded by saltwater - I live aboard a sailboat and my 505 is only
      Message 2 of 8 , Mar 7 4:43 PM
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        Hey Matt, I can not address the Razor. However I can address the salt water. I too, live surrounded by saltwater - I live aboard a sailboat and my 505 is only in the brine. I get it out whenever we are at anchor just to play around and sail circles around the Catalina. Rust sucks! Saltwater and batteries don't mix. Saltwater and electronics don't mix. So.... if'n that's the route you have to take, you have to make sure that everything is truly water tight and non-rusting. I exchanged carbon fibre for wire wherever possible. Use Stainless Steel where ever possible. My charging contacts are two "hard points" on the deck that I use test clips to attach to the charger - no leaky holes in the deck. My electronics are in little screw top plastic cans sealed with ( my favorite ) Lanolin! Get the real stuff through your pharmacy, don't settle for anything less than Lanocote or prescription grade Lanolin. Sticky, gooey messy stuff, but it keeps the water out. I use it liberally on the real sailboat too! My other favorite product is Boeing T-9, it's a spray water proofer / sealer / displacement / anti rust / corrosion product that works. Think WD-40 on steroids. I go through about a can a year on the big boat. Also, fresh water rinse everything after an outing - your sails will love you. One more thought: I use a magnetic reed switch to turn on / off the electrics so that I don't need a hole in the deck for a switch ( Normally Closed - the Magnet Kills the circuit ) - get'em at places like Radio Shack. For my display pieces I embed the magnet in a "pile of rope" so that it looks like it belongs on deck when on display. Remove the "rope" and the boat is armed and ready to go.
        Congrats on your built in competitor, sounds like a ton of fun for you two.
        Al


        On Mar 7, 2012, at 16:13 , matt.haugh wrote:

         

        I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a pair of Footy boats with my favorite shop buddy, my nine-year-old son. We're looking forward to tweaking and racing whatever we build, and we want them to be identical (ish) so the emphasis will be on boat handling. I'm an experienced scale aircraft builder, so tools and materials are in plentiful supply.

        Razor a good first choice? Is there another design that would be "better" in terms of either build simplicity or performance? (Please, no bottles, we want to display our creations in the house and my wife is a big fan of "cute" so these boats need to look the part.)

        Anyone think a kit would be a better choice? (Kit makers are slow to get back to me, so I fear they're not cutting any longer.)

        Is there an ultimate tips-n-tricks thread somewhere that can help us avoid common pitfalls? I've read a few threads, but they're all over the map.

        Thanks for whatever light y'all can shed. We're looking forward to digging in!

        Last question: if we do a build log, where's the best forum in terms of sharing and getting advice from experienced builders.

        Oh hell, one more thing, we are surrounded by saltwater. This affects material choices, yes?

        Matt


      • matt.haugh
        Thank you for the FANTASTIC advice! I will take it all to heart, which will be instructive for my son as well. And yes, I m lucky to have him by my side. -Matt
        Message 3 of 8 , Mar 7 5:17 PM
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          Thank you for the FANTASTIC advice! I will take it all to heart, which will be instructive for my son as well. And yes, I'm lucky to have him by my side. -Matt


          --- In FootyUSA@yahoogroups.com, Al Szymanski <aszy@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hey Matt, I can not address the Razor. However I can address the salt water. I too, live surrounded by saltwater - I live aboard a sailboat and my 505 is only in the brine. I get it out whenever we are at anchor just to play around and sail circles around the Catalina. Rust sucks! Saltwater and batteries don't mix. Saltwater and electronics don't mix. So.... if'n that's the route you have to take, you have to make sure that everything is truly water tight and non-rusting. I exchanged carbon fibre for wire wherever possible. Use Stainless Steel where ever possible. My charging contacts are two "hard points" on the deck that I use test clips to attach to the charger - no leaky holes in the deck. My electronics are in little screw top plastic cans sealed with ( my favorite ) Lanolin! Get the real stuff through your pharmacy, don't settle for anything less than Lanocote or prescription grade Lanolin. Sticky, gooey messy stuff, but it keeps the water out. I use it liberally on the real sailboat too! My other favorite product is Boeing T-9, it's a spray water proofer / sealer / displacement / anti rust / corrosion product that works. Think WD-40 on steroids. I go through about a can a year on the big boat. Also, fresh water rinse everything after an outing - your sails will love you. One more thought: I use a magnetic reed switch to turn on / off the electrics so that I don't need a hole in the deck for a switch ( Normally Closed - the Magnet Kills the circuit ) - get'em at places like Radio Shack. For my display pieces I embed the magnet in a "pile of rope" so that it looks like it belongs on deck when on display. Remove the "rope" and the boat is armed and ready to go.
          > Congrats on your built in competitor, sounds like a ton of fun for you two.
          > Al
          >
          >
          > On Mar 7, 2012, at 16:13 , matt.haugh wrote:
          >
          > I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a pair of Footy boats with my favorite shop buddy, my nine-year-old son. We're looking forward to tweaking and racing whatever we build, and we want them to be identical (ish) so the emphasis will be on boat handling. I'm an experienced scale aircraft builder, so tools and materials are in plentiful supply.
          >
          > Razor a good first choice? Is there another design that would be "better" in terms of either build simplicity or performance? (Please, no bottles, we want to display our creations in the house and my wife is a big fan of "cute" so these boats need to look the part.)
          >
          > Anyone think a kit would be a better choice? (Kit makers are slow to get back to me, so I fear they're not cutting any longer.)
          >
          > Is there an ultimate tips-n-tricks thread somewhere that can help us avoid common pitfalls? I've read a few threads, but they're all over the map.
          >
          > Thanks for whatever light y'all can shed. We're looking forward to digging in!
          >
          > Last question: if we do a build log, where's the best forum in terms of sharing and getting advice from experienced builders.
          >
          > Oh hell, one more thing, we are surrounded by saltwater. This affects material choices, yes?
          >
          > Matt
          >
        • Stanley
          The Razor 3 is a fairly easy first build, especially in plywood. I have a build log (certainly not the definitive build) at townsendpdx.com. The Pool Shark 3D
          Message 4 of 8 , Mar 7 5:57 PM
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            The Razor 3 is a fairly easy first build, especially in plywood. I have a build log (certainly not the definitive build) at townsendpdx.com. The Pool Shark 3D is even easier and is a kick to sail.

            --- In FootyUSA@yahoogroups.com, "matt.haugh" <matt.haugh@...> wrote:
            >
            > I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is
            > that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a
            > pair of Footy boats with my favorite shop buddy, my nine-year-old son.
            > We're looking forward to tweaking and racing whatever we build, and we
            > want them to be identical (ish) so the emphasis will be on boat
            > handling. I'm an experienced scale aircraft builder, so tools and
            > materials are in plentiful supply.
            >
            > Razor a good first choice? Is there another design that would be
            > "better" in terms of either build simplicity or performance? (Please, no
            > bottles, we want to display our creations in the house and my wife is a
            > big fan of "cute" so these boats need to look the part.)
            >
            > Anyone think a kit would be a better choice? (Kit makers are slow to get
            > back to me, so I fear they're not cutting any longer.)
            >
            > Is there an ultimate tips-n-tricks thread somewhere that can help us
            > avoid common pitfalls? I've read a few threads, but they're all over the
            > map.
            >
            > Thanks for whatever light y'all can shed. We're looking forward to
            > digging in!
            >
            > Last question: if we do a build log, where's the best forum in terms of
            > sharing and getting advice from experienced builders.
            >
            > Oh hell, one more thing, we are surrounded by saltwater. This affects
            > material choices, yes?
            >
            > Matt
            >
          • Al Szymanski
            Stanley, just visited your site.. We used to live in Aumsville!!! Small world, eh? Lovely web site. ( we lived within a stones hard throw of the olde Shaw
            Message 5 of 8 , Mar 7 6:12 PM
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              Stanley, just visited your site.. We used to live in Aumsville!!! Small world, eh? Lovely web site.
              ( we lived within a stones hard throw of the olde Shaw Store. ) Al

              On Mar 7, 2012, at 17:57 , Stanley wrote:

               

              The Razor 3 is a fairly easy first build, especially in plywood. I have a build log (certainly not the definitive build) at townsendpdx.com. The Pool Shark 3D is even easier and is a kick to sail.

              --- In FootyUSA@yahoogroups.com, "matt.haugh" <matt.haugh@...> wrote:
              >
              > I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is
              > that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a
              > pair of Footy boats with my favorite shop buddy, my nine-year-old son.
              > We're looking forward to tweaking and racing whatever we build, and we
              > want them to be identical (ish) so the emphasis will be on boat
              > handling. I'm an experienced scale aircraft builder, so tools and
              > materials are in plentiful supply.
              >
              > Razor a good first choice? Is there another design that would be
              > "better" in terms of either build simplicity or performance? (Please, no
              > bottles, we want to display our creations in the house and my wife is a
              > big fan of "cute" so these boats need to look the part.)
              >
              > Anyone think a kit would be a better choice? (Kit makers are slow to get
              > back to me, so I fear they're not cutting any longer.)
              >
              > Is there an ultimate tips-n-tricks thread somewhere that can help us
              > avoid common pitfalls? I've read a few threads, but they're all over the
              > map.
              >
              > Thanks for whatever light y'all can shed. We're looking forward to
              > digging in!
              >
              > Last question: if we do a build log, where's the best forum in terms of
              > sharing and getting advice from experienced builders.
              >
              > Oh hell, one more thing, we are surrounded by saltwater. This affects
              > material choices, yes?
              >
              > Matt
              >


            • oian.n@juno.com
              I second on the Pool Shark, That was my first build. The kit has everything including ready made paneled sails. You just supply glue, paint and radio gear.
              Message 6 of 8 , Mar 7 6:49 PM
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              I second on the Pool Shark, That was my first build. The kit has everything including ready made paneled sails. You just supply glue, paint and radio gear. it's an easy build (vacuum formed hull and deck, molded keel fin and rudder, and comes with a step by step DVD and is a very good sailer. As far as the salt water, it's a very dry boat. And it's cute, see attached photo

              ---------- Original Message ----------
              From: Al Szymanski <aszy@...>
              To: FootyUSA@yahoogroups.com, townsendpdx@...
              Subject: Re: [FootyUSA] Re: Razor suitable for first build?
              Date: Wed, 07 Mar 2012 18:12:44 -0800

               

              Stanley, just visited your site.. We used to live in Aumsville!!! Small world, eh? Lovely web site.

              ( we lived within a stones hard throw of the olde Shaw Store. ) Al

              On Mar 7, 2012, at 17:57 , Stanley wrote:

               

              The Razor 3 is a fairly easy first build, especially in plywood. I have a build log (certainly not the definitive build) at townsendpdx.com. The Pool Shark 3D is even easier and is a kick to sail.

              --- In FootyUSA@yahoogroups.com, "matt.haugh" <matt.haugh@...> wrote:
              >
              > I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is
              > that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a
              > pair of Footy boats with my favorite shop buddy, my nine-year-old son.
              > We're looking forward to tweaking and racing whatever we build, and we
              > want them to be identical (ish) so the emphasis will be on boat
              > handling. I'm an experienced scale aircraft builder, so tools and
              > materials are in plentiful supply.
              >
              > Razor a good first choice? Is there another design that would be
              > "better" in terms of either build simplicity or performance? (Please, no
              > bottles, we want to display our creations in the house and my wife is a
              > big fan of "cute" so these boats need to look the part.)
              >
              > Anyone think a kit would be a better choice? (Kit makers are slow to get
              > back to me, so I fear they're not cutting any longer.)
              >
              > Is there an ultimate tips-n-tricks thread somewhere that can help us
              > avoid common pitfalls? I've read a few threads, but they're all over the
              > map.
              >
              > Thanks for whatever light y'all can shed. We're looking forward to
              > digging in!
              >
              > Last question: if we do a build log, where's the best forum in terms of
              > sharing and getting advice from experienced builders.
              >
              > Oh hell, one more thing, we are surrounded by saltwater. This affects
              > material choices, yes?
              >
              > Matt
              >

               

               



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            • matt.haugh
              I ll inquire about the Pool Shark. I agree it s cute, and I like the simplicity. I still lean toward wood, and building from plans (like I prefer to do with
              Message 7 of 8 , Mar 7 10:05 PM
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                I'll inquire about the Pool Shark. I agree it's cute, and I like the simplicity. I still lean toward wood, and building from plans (like I prefer to do with airplanes) but for our first go, a kit might increase the odds of success enormously.

                Thanks all for the suggestions!

                -Matt


                --- In FootyUSA@yahoogroups.com, "oian.n@..." <oian.n@...> wrote:
                >
                > I second on the Pool Shark, That was my first build. The kit has everything including ready made paneled sails. You just supply glue, paint and radio gear. it's an easy build (vacuum formed hull and deck, molded keel fin and rudder, and comes with a step by step DVD and is a very good sailer. As far as the salt water, it's a very dry boat. And it's cute, see attached photo
                >
                > ---------- Original Message ----------
                > From: Al Szymanski <aszy@...>
                > To: FootyUSA@yahoogroups.com, townsendpdx@...
                > Subject: Re: [FootyUSA] Re: Razor suitable for first build?
                > Date: Wed, 07 Mar 2012 18:12:44 -0800
                >
                >
                > <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
                > Stanley, just visited your site.. We used to live in Aumsville!!! Small world, eh? Lovely web site.
                > ( we lived within a stones hard throw of the olde Shaw Store. ) Al
                > On Mar 7, 2012, at 17:57 , Stanley wrote: The Razor 3 is a fairly easy first build, especially in plywood. I have a build log (certainly not the definitive build) at townsendpdx.com. The Pool Shark 3D is even easier and is a kick to sail.
                >
                > --- In FootyUSA@yahoogroups.com, "matt.haugh" <matt.haugh@> wrote:
                > >
                > > I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is
                > > that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a
                > > pair of Footy boats with my favorite shop buddy, my nine-year-old son.
                > > We're looking forward to tweaking and racing whatever we build, and we
                > > want them to be identical (ish) so the emphasis will be on boat
                > > handling. I'm an experienced scale aircraft builder, so tools and
                > > materials are in plentiful supply.
                > >
                > > Razor a good first choice? Is there another design that would be
                > > "better" in terms of either build simplicity or performance? (Please, no
                > > bottles, we want to display our creations in the house and my wife is a
                > > big fan of "cute" so these boats need to look the part.)
                > >
                > > Anyone think a kit would be a better choice? (Kit makers are slow to get
                > > back to me, so I fear they're not cutting any longer.)
                > >
                > > Is there an ultimate tips-n-tricks thread somewhere that can help us
                > > avoid common pitfalls? I've read a few threads, but they're all over the
                > > map.
                > >
                > > Thanks for whatever light y'all can shed. We're looking forward to
                > > digging in!
                > >
                > > Last question: if we do a build log, where's the best forum in terms of
                > > sharing and getting advice from experienced builders.
                > >
                > > Oh hell, one more thing, we are surrounded by saltwater. This affects
                > > material choices, yes?
                > >
                > > Matt
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > ____________________________________________________________
                > 53 Year Old Mom Looks 33
                > The Stunning Results of Her Wrinkle Trick Has Botox Doctors Worried
                > http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3141/4f581e547fed92299452st05duc
                >
              • George at KGA
                Magnetic switches is a great idea. I have been pursuing that type of solution for some time now. An example of one switch as Al describes can be found at
                Message 8 of 8 , Mar 8 12:47 AM
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                  Magnetic switches is a great idea.  I have been pursuing that type of solution for some time now.  An example of one switch as Al describes can be found at http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2419297.  Here is a problem, at least potential problem.  These switches are designed for security systems, low voltage, low current.  Typically these type of switches will switch max current of 200 mA.  The servos that I was trying to control with this type of switch draw 200 mA on idle and 3 A on stall load.  This type of switch failed in my application (controlling Victoria and IOM servos).  I end up designing and building my own.  I don’t know how much current one would need to switch on a Footy in heavy wind but having 2 servos (rudder and sail) I think 1 A is a reasonable estimate.  Be careful and choose the switch that can handle the needed current.
                   
                  George in Portland
                   
                  Sent: Wednesday, March 07, 2012 4:43 PM
                  Subject: Re: [FootyUSA] Razor suitable for first build?
                   
                   

                  Hey Matt, I can not address the Razor. However I can address the salt water. I too, live surrounded by saltwater - I live aboard a sailboat and my 505 is only in the brine. I get it out whenever we are at anchor just to play around and sail circles around the Catalina. Rust sucks! Saltwater and batteries don't mix. Saltwater and electronics don't mix. So.... if'n that's the route you have to take, you have to make sure that everything is truly water tight and non-rusting. I exchanged carbon fibre for wire wherever possible. Use Stainless Steel where ever possible. My charging contacts are two "hard points" on the deck that I use test clips to attach to the charger - no leaky holes in the deck. My electronics are in little screw top plastic cans sealed with ( my favorite ) Lanolin! Get the real stuff through your pharmacy, don't settle for anything less than Lanocote or prescription grade Lanolin. Sticky, gooey messy stuff, but it keeps the water out. I use it liberally on the real sailboat too! My other favorite product is Boeing T-9, it's a spray water proofer / sealer / displacement / anti rust / corrosion product that works. Think WD-40 on steroids. I go through about a can a year on the big boat. Also, fresh water rinse everything after an outing - your sails will love you. One more thought: I use a magnetic reed switch to turn on / off the electrics so that I don't need a hole in the deck for a switch ( Normally Closed - the Magnet Kills the circuit ) - get'em at places like Radio Shack. For my display pieces I embed the magnet in a "pile of rope" so that it looks like it belongs on deck when on display. Remove the "rope" and the boat is armed and ready to go.

                  Congrats on your built in competitor, sounds like a ton of fun for you two.
                  Al
                   
                   
                  On Mar 7, 2012, at 16:13 , matt.haugh wrote:
                   
                   

                  I know this question (or variations) gets asked a lot, but the twist is that in addition to me being completely new to yachts, I want to build a pair of Footy boats with my favorite shop buddy, my nine-year-old son. We're looking forward to tweaking and racing whatever we build, and we want them to be identical (ish) so the emphasis will be on boat handling. I'm an experienced scale aircraft builder, so tools and materials are in plentiful supply.

                  Razor a good first choice? Is there another design that would be "better" in terms of either build simplicity or performance? (Please, no bottles, we want to display our creations in the house and my wife is a big fan of "cute" so these boats need to look the part.)

                  Anyone think a kit would be a better choice? (Kit makers are slow to get back to me, so I fear they're not cutting any longer.)

                  Is there an ultimate tips-n-tricks thread somewhere that can help us avoid common pitfalls? I've read a few threads, but they're all over the map.

                  Thanks for whatever light y'all can shed. We're looking forward to digging in!

                  Last question: if we do a build log, where's the best forum in terms of sharing and getting advice from experienced builders.

                  Oh hell, one more thing, we are surrounded by saltwater. This affects material choices, yes?

                  Matt

                   
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