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Re: Poisoned again!

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  • Ronald Eheman
    Donna Take a look here http://www.doctorspiller.com/dental_materials.htm#Silicate As a rule, when you emerge from the dentist s office, you frequently come
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 1, 2006
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      Donna

      Take a look here

      http://www.doctorspiller.com/dental_materials.htm#Silicate


      As a rule, when you emerge from the dentist's office, you frequently
      come away with something in your mouth that nature didn't put
      there. This page is for people who have a burning desire to know
      just what these things are made out of. As an example, I can repair
      teeth with glass or zinc composite materials (generally white
      fillings), metal, plastic or porcelain. I personally use seven
      different types of composite filling materials. In addition, I use
      six different cements, four types of castable metals, two types of
      metal composite filling materials and a growing number of castable,
      sintered, milled and fused porcelains. In addition to repairing
      teeth, I replace teeth using various types of plastics including
      acrylic, nylon, esters and carbon fiber materials. Each material
      has advantages and disadvantages, as well as specific indications
      and contra-indications for their use. This page will discuss the
      most commonly used types of dental materials.

      It is a long page - go and read - Just what type of filling did the
      dentist put in?


      Ronnie

      --- In FluoridePoisoning@yahoogroups.com, Donna Cowan
      <connemara97008@...> wrote:
      >
      > Thanks Aliss...I will look for L-taurine and Calcium-C powder at
      Trader Joes today, not sure I can get it there. I appreciate your
      prompt response.
      >
      > A Terpstra <aliss@...> wrote: Hi Donna,
      > It could be that the symptoms are identical because methacrylate
      chemicals
      > interfere with enzymes the same way that fluoride does. The mold
      material
      > they press around your teeth is awful too.
      >
      > Did you try taking magnesium and L-taurine? That often helps me.
      The
      > L-taurine makes your body keep the magnesium in your cells where
      it belongs.
      > I take calcium-C powder in water throughout the day and it helps
      too.
      >
      > Aliss
      >
      >
      >
      > > My body can't take any more! I told the dentist I was allergic
      to
      > > fluoride and metals......they put in 5 temporaries and I trusted
      there was
      > > NO fluoride in them. I wore them for 10 days and ready to cut
      my head
      > > off. I was in denial that it was fluoride related! Same awful
      symptoms
      > > as the first time, however! Now my legs are so weak in the
      mornings that
      > > I can hardly stand up. (110 pounds) But I will NOT give in!
      Back to the
      > > dentist today after calling him Sunday and prying off the
      temporaries with
      > > a screw driver. He says NO fluoride in the make up of these
      temporaries.
      > > Here is some of what it says on the "Material Safety Data Sheet"
      that I
      > > requested.
      > >
      > > Revision date: 23-06-1997
      > > Preparation of acrylic resin, glass powder and silica
      > > Luxatemp......contains urethane dimethacrylate, aromatiac
      dimethacrylate,
      > > glycol methacrylate.
      > >
      > > B.S. there's NO fluoride.....I can feel it!!
      > >
      > > Anybody know about the "make up" of the above mentioned crap?
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > SPONSORED LINKS
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      >
      > Visit your group "FluoridePoisoning" on the web.
      >
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    • Ronald Eheman
      -google search = composite dental fillings fluoride http://www.louisianaresearch.com/article_fillgap.html Filling the gap LSUHSC dentists are developing better
      Message 2 of 6 , Mar 1, 2006
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        -google search = composite dental fillings fluoride




        http://www.louisianaresearch.com/article_fillgap.html

        Filling the gap

        LSUHSC dentists are developing better biomaterials for fillings.

        By Leslie Capo

        Most of us have visited the dentist, found out we had a cavity, and
        gone through the sometimes painful experience of having a tooth
        filled. For some, the experience gets even worse-when a filling does
        not bond to the tooth properly and a gap develops around it, the
        result can be new decay and the need for an even larger filling.

        Today, faculty members at the LSU Health Sciences Center in New
        Orleans' School of Dentistry are trying to fill this gap. They are
        working to develop new biomaterials that could make fillings more
        effective and save millions of dental patients money.

        "Dental caries, or tooth decay, is the most common infectious
        disease," notes John Burgess, D.D.S., M.S., who is assistant dean of
        clinical research at the school. According to the World Health
        Organization's latest report, 5 billion people worldwide have dental
        decay. It's a big problem that needs a better solution.

        As most people know, the treatment for a cavity is to remove the
        decay and fill the area with a dental filling material. These days,
        tooth-colored dental composite resins are widely used in restorative
        dentistry since they provide durable, natural-looking esthetic
        fillings. These fillings are bonded to the tooth with an adhesive,
        which is applied prior to the composite resin filling.

        Even though most dentists use composites routinely, they have a
        number of drawbacks. For instance, composite resins shrink during
        the hardening process, creating spaces, or cracks, between the tooth
        and filling. When that happens, new decay can develop in the space
        between the tooth and the filling, requiring an even larger filling
        to restore the tooth. Improved dental adhesives may prevent or
        reduce that gap.

        "Recurrent tooth decay is the most frequent cause for the failure of
        dental restorations or fillings," says Xiaoming Xu, Ph.D., assistant
        professor of operative dentistry and biomaterials. He is leading a
        new research project at the LSUHSC-NO dental school to develop new
        types of fluoride-releasing adhesives and sealants with improved
        sealing ability.

        The dental school research team is working to develop new chemical
        compounds with improved adhesive as well as self-etching
        capabilities. The self-etching feature will reduce the time it takes
        to place the filling. The fluoride-releasing bonding agents based on
        the new compounds will release fluoride directly into the tooth
        structure and facilitate the transport of fluoride, rather than
        hinder it.

        Fluoride, an effective decay-fighting agent, helps prevent new areas
        of decay from forming. Unfortunately, the adhesives used with
        current composite filling materials release little or no fluoride.
        In fact, today's dental bonding materials can actually form a
        barrier hindering the transport of fluoride from the restorative
        materials into the tooth.

        "We are developing new ligands, or molecules, to build into the
        adhesive that will hold the fluoride, but not too tightly," said
        Burgess. "What happens now is that while you can get fluoride in, it
        is bound so tightly that it's difficult to get out. The compound we
        are working on will have a mechanism to hold the fluoride for a
        period of time and release it slowly. The mechanism will also allow
        the fluoride to be replenished when it's gone. It's a replacement
        mechanism rather than a decomposition mechanism."

        Sealants-plastic coatings used to seal small pits and fissures in
        back teeth and prevent their future decay-are not now being used by
        many dentists because of a fear that the material will leak,
        allowing decay to progress undetected under the sealant until the
        cavity is very large.

        "We are developing new monomers, or plastic materials, that we will
        blend into existing sealants to make them self-adhesive," said
        Xu. "These new monomers will have improved wetting, to bond directly
        to the tooth, saving steps which will not only save time, but also
        reduce the chance for contamination."

        Sealants containing the new compounds will not only adhere to tooth
        enamel better, they will have improved fluoride-releasing capacity
        as well as the ability to be "recharged" with fluoride-that is to
        replace the fluoride after the original amount has been released.
        This means that the anti-decay effects will last for the life of the
        filling.

        One of several projects funded by a $10.7 million grant from the
        National Institutes of Health's Centers of Biomedical Research
        Excellence (COBRE) Program, the research has major potential for
        future technology transfer. The researchers at LSUHSC School of
        dentistry believe the technology will be patentible, and the new
        products developed could be used by dentists worldwide.

        "If successful, these new fluoride-releasing adhesive and sealant
        materials can greatly reduce recurrent tooth decay, prolong the life
        of dental treatment, and reduce the number of dental visits,
        significantly reducing the cost of dental care," concludes Burgess.
      • Donna Cowan
        Thanks for the info. Ronald Eheman wrote: -google search = composite dental fillings fluoride
        Message 3 of 6 , Mar 2, 2006
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          Thanks for the info.

          Ronald Eheman <rge@...> wrote: -google search = composite dental fillings fluoride




          http://www.louisianaresearch.com/article_fillgap.html

          Filling the gap

          LSUHSC dentists are developing better biomaterials for fillings.

          By Leslie Capo

          Most of us have visited the dentist, found out we had a cavity, and
          gone through the sometimes painful experience of having a tooth
          filled. For some, the experience gets even worse-when a filling does
          not bond to the tooth properly and a gap develops around it, the
          result can be new decay and the need for an even larger filling.

          Today, faculty members at the LSU Health Sciences Center in New
          Orleans' School of Dentistry are trying to fill this gap. They are
          working to develop new biomaterials that could make fillings more
          effective and save millions of dental patients money.

          "Dental caries, or tooth decay, is the most common infectious
          disease," notes John Burgess, D.D.S., M.S., who is assistant dean of
          clinical research at the school. According to the World Health
          Organization's latest report, 5 billion people worldwide have dental
          decay. It's a big problem that needs a better solution.

          As most people know, the treatment for a cavity is to remove the
          decay and fill the area with a dental filling material. These days,
          tooth-colored dental composite resins are widely used in restorative
          dentistry since they provide durable, natural-looking esthetic
          fillings. These fillings are bonded to the tooth with an adhesive,
          which is applied prior to the composite resin filling.

          Even though most dentists use composites routinely, they have a
          number of drawbacks. For instance, composite resins shrink during
          the hardening process, creating spaces, or cracks, between the tooth
          and filling. When that happens, new decay can develop in the space
          between the tooth and the filling, requiring an even larger filling
          to restore the tooth. Improved dental adhesives may prevent or
          reduce that gap.

          "Recurrent tooth decay is the most frequent cause for the failure of
          dental restorations or fillings," says Xiaoming Xu, Ph.D., assistant
          professor of operative dentistry and biomaterials. He is leading a
          new research project at the LSUHSC-NO dental school to develop new
          types of fluoride-releasing adhesives and sealants with improved
          sealing ability.

          The dental school research team is working to develop new chemical
          compounds with improved adhesive as well as self-etching
          capabilities. The self-etching feature will reduce the time it takes
          to place the filling. The fluoride-releasing bonding agents based on
          the new compounds will release fluoride directly into the tooth
          structure and facilitate the transport of fluoride, rather than
          hinder it.

          Fluoride, an effective decay-fighting agent, helps prevent new areas
          of decay from forming. Unfortunately, the adhesives used with
          current composite filling materials release little or no fluoride.
          In fact, today's dental bonding materials can actually form a
          barrier hindering the transport of fluoride from the restorative
          materials into the tooth.

          "We are developing new ligands, or molecules, to build into the
          adhesive that will hold the fluoride, but not too tightly," said
          Burgess. "What happens now is that while you can get fluoride in, it
          is bound so tightly that it's difficult to get out. The compound we
          are working on will have a mechanism to hold the fluoride for a
          period of time and release it slowly. The mechanism will also allow
          the fluoride to be replenished when it's gone. It's a replacement
          mechanism rather than a decomposition mechanism."

          Sealants-plastic coatings used to seal small pits and fissures in
          back teeth and prevent their future decay-are not now being used by
          many dentists because of a fear that the material will leak,
          allowing decay to progress undetected under the sealant until the
          cavity is very large.

          "We are developing new monomers, or plastic materials, that we will
          blend into existing sealants to make them self-adhesive," said
          Xu. "These new monomers will have improved wetting, to bond directly
          to the tooth, saving steps which will not only save time, but also
          reduce the chance for contamination."

          Sealants containing the new compounds will not only adhere to tooth
          enamel better, they will have improved fluoride-releasing capacity
          as well as the ability to be "recharged" with fluoride-that is to
          replace the fluoride after the original amount has been released.
          This means that the anti-decay effects will last for the life of the
          filling.

          One of several projects funded by a $10.7 million grant from the
          National Institutes of Health's Centers of Biomedical Research
          Excellence (COBRE) Program, the research has major potential for
          future technology transfer. The researchers at LSUHSC School of
          dentistry believe the technology will be patentible, and the new
          products developed could be used by dentists worldwide.

          "If successful, these new fluoride-releasing adhesive and sealant
          materials can greatly reduce recurrent tooth decay, prolong the life
          of dental treatment, and reduce the number of dental visits,
          significantly reducing the cost of dental care," concludes Burgess.











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