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OT: LOTR thoughts

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  • Lynn
    It s been a long time since I ve read LOTR or seen the original Star Wars, but watching that trailer, it struck me how similar the two are. Lucas monster in
    Message 1 of 29 , Oct 1, 2001
      It's been a long time since I've read LOTR or seen the original Star
      Wars, but watching that trailer, it struck me how similar the two are.
      Lucas' monster in the trash compactor is very like the nasty lurking in
      the pool outside the gates, and Gandalf and Obi Wan "die" under similar
      circumstances.

      And I know I owe a lot. Tolkien certainly taught me how to world build
      with small, homely details, and we both get off to rather slow starts
      with our stories. And my dyrmagnos are surely relatives of the nazgul;
      I was always struck by the horror of how unnaturally they moved. Of
      course, JRR is drawing from the same collective unconscious as the rest
      of us, too, but he certainly brought some things to the surface nicely.

      :-)
    • dangelle@hotmail.com
      ... Star ... are. ... lurking in ... similar ... I really like the Harry Potter books, but while reading them I keep ticking off an imaginary list in my head.
      Message 2 of 29 , Oct 1, 2001
        --- In Flewelling@y..., "Lynn" <Leafmirror@a...> wrote:
        > It's been a long time since I've read LOTR or seen the original
        Star
        > Wars, but watching that trailer, it struck me how similar the two
        are.
        > Lucas' monster in the trash compactor is very like the nasty
        lurking in
        > the pool outside the gates, and Gandalf and Obi Wan "die" under
        similar
        > circumstances.
        >

        I really like the Harry Potter books, but while reading them I keep
        ticking off an imaginary list in my head. "Just like LOTR", I'll say
        to myself. The sorceror's stone is the palantir, the dementers are
        the Nazgul, Harry spares the life of whats-his-name just like Bilbo
        spares Gollum in The Hobbit with Gandalf/Dumbledore making the same
        observation that what's-his-name/Gollum has a part for good or ill to
        play yet. There are more ha-ha! moments, but those are the ones I
        can think of off the top of my head.

        Angelle
      • Rie Sheridan
        As a writer of fantasy I must remind everyone...everyone is going to have something that strikes a chord to Tolkien--whether in deliberate homage or
        Message 3 of 29 , Oct 1, 2001
          As a writer of fantasy I must remind everyone...everyone is
          going to have something that strikes a chord to
          Tolkien--whether in deliberate homage or
          subconsciously--simply because he wrote so MANY
          details...lol. It would be impossible not to compare most
          fantasy to LOTR on some scale. IMHO

          --- dangelle@... wrote:
          > --- In Flewelling@y..., "Lynn" <Leafmirror@a...> wrote:
          > > It's been a long time since I've read LOTR or seen the
          > original
          > Star
          > > Wars, but watching that trailer, it struck me how
          > similar the two
          > are.
          > > Lucas' monster in the trash compactor is very like the
          > nasty
          > lurking in
          > > the pool outside the gates, and Gandalf and Obi Wan
          > "die" under
          > similar
          > > circumstances.
          > >
          >
          > I really like the Harry Potter books, but while reading
          > them I keep
          > ticking off an imaginary list in my head. "Just like
          > LOTR", I'll say
          > to myself. The sorceror's stone is the palantir, the
          > dementers are
          > the Nazgul, Harry spares the life of whats-his-name just
          > like Bilbo
          > spares Gollum in The Hobbit with Gandalf/Dumbledore
          > making the same
          > observation that what's-his-name/Gollum has a part for
          > good or ill to
          > play yet. There are more ha-ha! moments, but those are
          > the ones I
          > can think of off the top of my head.
          >
          > Angelle
          >
          >


          =====
          Rie Sheridan
          website: http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/riesheridan
          RIEVISIONS and DANCING ON THE EDGE-SunnySide Up Publishing
          THE BLOOD THAT BINDS-12/3/01 from NovelBooks,Inc.
          THE LUTE AND THE LIAR-6/10/02 http://novelbooksinc.com
          THE RIGHT HAND OF VELACHAZ-Fall 2002 from LTD Books


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        • Lynn
          ... And of course, JRR wasn t working in a vacuum, either. He based his Middle Earth heavily on the real world as he knew it, in his own day and through his
          Message 4 of 29 , Oct 1, 2001
            --- In Flewelling@y..., Rie Sheridan <riewrites1@y...> wrote:
            > As a writer of fantasy I must remind everyone...everyone is
            > going to have something that strikes a chord to
            > Tolkien--whether in deliberate homage or
            > subconsciously--simply because he wrote so MANY
            > details...lol. It would be impossible not to compare most
            > fantasy to LOTR on some scale. IMHO


            And of course, JRR wasn't working in a vacuum, either. He based his
            Middle Earth heavily on the real world as he knew it, in his own day
            and through his extensivce knowledge of history and legend. It's the
            same well we all draw from. I've read that he was also heavily impacted
            by the rise of fascism, and that it colored his villans, just as world
            events color mine. Life is a rich, if you pay attention. ;-)
          • dangelle@hotmail.com
            ... Ever hear the Jane Siberry song Everything Reminds Me of My Dog ? Well, there is an awful lot of stuff out there that reminds me LOTR ;) Angelle
            Message 5 of 29 , Oct 1, 2001
              --- In Flewelling@y..., Rie Sheridan <riewrites1@y...> wrote:
              > As a writer of fantasy I must remind everyone...everyone is
              > going to have something that strikes a chord to
              > Tolkien--whether in deliberate homage or
              > subconsciously--simply because he wrote so MANY
              > details...lol. It would be impossible not to compare most
              > fantasy to LOTR on some scale. IMHO
              >

              Ever hear the Jane Siberry song "Everything Reminds Me of My Dog"?
              Well, there is an awful lot of stuff out there that reminds me
              LOTR ;)

              Angelle
            • ambermoon_00@yahoo.com
              Hullo, I m new to this group, but would like to make a short reply to this post: whether or not the sorceror s stone of the Harry Potter books has any
              Message 6 of 29 , Oct 1, 2001
                Hullo,

                I'm new to this group, but would like to make a short reply to
                this post: whether or not the "sorceror's stone" of the Harry Potter
                books has any relation to the palantir on LotR, it was not created by
                JK Rowling. The term is a misprint favoured by American publishers
                who think books sell better the more explicit they are about magic:
                the original British term is "philosopher's stone," which many will
                recognize as an actual object of legend, possessing more or less the
                powers ascribed to it by JK Rowling.

                Angelle said:
                > I really like the Harry Potter books, but while reading them I keep
                > ticking off an imaginary list in my head. "Just like LOTR", I'll
                > say to myself. The sorceror's stone is the palantir <snip>

                I never made a connection before between the Nazgul and the
                dyrmagnos, but I can certainly see one now. Could a comparison also
                be made between the Ringwraiths and the dra'gorgos? That creature had
                the same sort of insubstantial horror associated with the wraiths;
                all are the stuff of nightmare. Or perhaps the dra'gorgos is like the
                barrow-wights, only much, much worse . . . . I think I shall stop
                attempting comparisons now.

                Erin
              • Rie Sheridan
                ... whether or not the sorceror s stone of the Harry Potter books has any relation to the palantir on LotR, it was not created by JK Rowling. The term is a
                Message 7 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                  --- ambermoon_00@... wrote:
                  whether or not the "sorceror's stone" of the Harry Potter
                  books has any relation to the palantir on LotR, it was
                  not created by JK Rowling. The term is a misprint favoured
                  by American publishers who think books sell better the more
                  explicit they are about magic: the original British term is
                  "philosopher's stone," which many will recognize as an
                  actual object of legend, possessing more or less the powers
                  ascribed to it by JK Rowling.
                  >
                  I haven't gotten that far yet--I'm only just now starting
                  the series...Harry just got to the school--but it seems to
                  me that there is a difference between a "misprint" and a
                  "revision"...changing "philosopher" to "sorceror" is a
                  bigger editorial choice than misspelling the word. Have you
                  had any similar changes requested, Lynn? (Trying to insert
                  a modicum of on-topic into our discussion...lol)


                  =====
                  Rie Sheridan
                  website: http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/riesheridan
                  RIEVISIONS and DANCING ON THE EDGE-SunnySide Up Publishing
                  THE BLOOD THAT BINDS-12/3/01 from NovelBooks,Inc.
                  THE LUTE AND THE LIAR-6/10/02 http://novelbooksinc.com
                  THE RIGHT HAND OF VELACHAZ-Fall 2002 from LTD Books


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                • Lynn
                  ... Certainly. It s not that I set out to consciously copy JRR at all; I didn t intend for there to be an exact correlation. But the concept of something that
                  Message 8 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                    --- In Flewelling@y..., ambermoon_00@y... wrote:
                    > Hullo,
                    >
                    > I never made a connection before between the Nazgul and the
                    > dyrmagnos, but I can certainly see one now. Could a comparison also
                    > be made between the Ringwraiths and the dra'gorgos? That creature had
                    > the same sort of insubstantial horror associated with the wraiths;
                    > all are the stuff of nightmare. Or perhaps the dra'gorgos is like the
                    > barrow-wights, only much, much worse . .

                    Certainly. It's not that I set out to consciously copy JRR at all; I
                    didn't intend for there to be an exact correlation. But the concept of
                    something that moved so unnaturally, had no human compassion, etc.
                    really inspired my own inventions. If you want to know what I'm
                    scared of, just read my books. ;-)
                  • Lynn
                    ... No. Apparently American translates better into UK English than the reverse. ;-) I also think that since I grew up reading mostly Brit Lit, that my
                    Message 9 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                      --- In Flewelling@y..., Rie Sheridan <riewrites1@y...> wrote:

                      > I haven't gotten that far yet--I'm only just now starting
                      > the series...Harry just got to the school--but it seems to
                      > me that there is a difference between a "misprint" and a
                      > "revision"...changing "philosopher" to "sorceror" is a
                      > bigger editorial choice than misspelling the word. Have you
                      > had any similar changes requested, Lynn? (Trying to insert
                      > a modicum of on-topic into our discussion...lol)


                      No. Apparently American translates better into UK English than the
                      reverse. ;-) I also think that since I grew up reading mostly Brit
                      Lit, that my writing style bridges the two.

                      But perhaps I should put that out for our Brit/Australian readers here.
                      Do I scan particularly "American"?

                      Lynn
                    • whetner@yahoo.com
                      That reminds me of my Harry Potter experiences that I had when I worked in a bookstore! Here in Canada, the Harry Potter books are sold with the orignal
                      Message 10 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                        That reminds me of my Harry Potter experiences that I had when I
                        worked in a bookstore! Here in Canada, the Harry Potter books are
                        sold with the orignal British text, covers and titles (they're just
                        reprinted here with the logo of the Canadian distributor). I lost
                        count of the many people coming in who insisted that there was
                        another book out in addition to the Philosopher's Stone and that it
                        had been on Rosie/Oprah/fill-in-US-TV-show-here. Then there was the
                        one customer who came in demanding to know how she could get a copy
                        of the AUTHENTIC version of the book, and who refused to believe me
                        that the one sold here wasn't the US version. I finally told her (in
                        a very polite voice, I might add) that the only way she could
                        absolutely, positively get a British version was to buy it from a
                        store in Britian. She, of course, left in a huff.

                        Boy am I glad I don't work in a bookstore anymore. Loved the books,
                        wished the customers would go away... ;)


                        --- In Flewelling@y..., ambermoon_00@y... wrote:
                        > Hullo,
                        >
                        > I'm new to this group, but would like to make a short reply to
                        > this post: whether or not the "sorceror's stone" of the Harry
                        Potter
                        > books has any relation to the palantir on LotR, it was not created
                        by
                        > JK Rowling. The term is a misprint favoured by American publishers
                        > who think books sell better the more explicit they are about magic:
                        > the original British term is "philosopher's stone," which many will
                        > recognize as an actual object of legend, possessing more or less
                        the
                        > powers ascribed to it by JK Rowling.
                        >
                        > Angelle said:
                        > > I really like the Harry Potter books, but while reading them I
                        keep
                        > > ticking off an imaginary list in my head. "Just like LOTR",
                        I'll
                        > > say to myself. The sorceror's stone is the palantir <snip>
                        >
                        > I never made a connection before between the Nazgul and the
                        > dyrmagnos, but I can certainly see one now. Could a comparison also
                        > be made between the Ringwraiths and the dra'gorgos? That creature
                        had
                        > the same sort of insubstantial horror associated with the wraiths;
                        > all are the stuff of nightmare. Or perhaps the dra'gorgos is like
                        the
                        > barrow-wights, only much, much worse . . . . I think I shall stop
                        > attempting comparisons now.
                        >
                        > Erin
                      • Lynn
                        ... What it seems to boil down to is that the US publisher thought US readers were too dumb to understand what it meant. I think a small note at the front of
                        Message 11 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                          --- In Flewelling@y..., whetner@y... wrote:
                          > That reminds me of my Harry Potter experiences that I had when I
                          > worked in a bookstore! Here in Canada, the Harry Potter books are
                          > sold with the orignal British text, covers and titles (they're just
                          > reprinted here with the logo of the Canadian distributor). I lost
                          > count of the many people coming in who insisted that there was
                          > another book out in addition to the Philosopher's Stone and that it
                          > had been on Rosie/Oprah/fill-in-US-TV-show-here.

                          What it seems to boil down to is that the US publisher thought US
                          readers were too dumb to understand what it meant. I think a small note
                          at the front of the book would have been a better choice, but they
                          didn't ask me. ;-)
                        • Andrea Chavez
                          ... HAHAHAHAHAAHAH --oh my god, that is is I had a damn hard time convincing a customer that there was actually no original version of The Princess Bride by
                          Message 12 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                            > Then there was the
                            > one customer who came in demanding to know how she
                            > could get a copy
                            > of the AUTHENTIC version of the book, and who
                            > refused to believe me
                            > that the one sold here wasn't the US version. I
                            > finally told her (in
                            > a very polite voice, I might add) that the only way
                            > she could
                            > absolutely, positively get a British version was to
                            > buy it from a
                            > store in Britian. She, of course, left in a huff.
                            >
                            > Boy am I glad I don't work in a bookstore anymore.
                            > Loved the books,
                            > wished the customers would go away... ;)

                            HAHAHAHAHAAHAH --oh my god, that is is
                            I had a damn hard time convincing a customer that
                            there was actually no "original" version of The
                            Princess Bride by G. Morgenstern. William Goldman
                            just made it all up!! it is FICTION!! :-) I can't
                            remember how I finally managed it...I think I had
                            about six other people in the store who all agreed
                            that that was true and The Princess Bride is just
                            that!

                            Clauda -- tell the Menopause story -- that one still
                            cracks me up.

                            Andrea -- who liked the tag line from Clerks "Just
                            because we help you, doesn't mean we like you."

                            :-)


                            =====
                            Andrea C

                            "I always pass on good advice,
                            It's the only thing to do with it" --Oscar Wilde

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                          • Ailei
                            ... My personal fav from my own B&N days went something like this: Customer: I m looking for a book. Ailei: Grand! Which one, sir? Customer: It was
                            Message 13 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                              >
                              > Boy am I glad I don't work in a bookstore anymore. Loved the books,
                              > wished the customers would go away... ;)

                              My personal fav from my own B&N days went something like this:

                              Customer: 'I'm looking for a book.'
                              Ailei: 'Grand! Which one, sir?'
                              Customer: 'It was green.'
                              Ailei: 'Okay. Which genre?'
                              Customer: 'Genre?'
                              Ailei (sighing inwardly): 'Fiction, Non-Fiction, Science-Fiction...'
                              (leading off expectantly)
                              Customer: 'I don't know.'
                              Ailei: 'Do you know who wrote it?'
                              Customer: 'I think it started with a 'P''
                              Ailei (ignoring the snickers as the other employees cleared a wide berth
                              around her and idiot!Customer): 'Well, then, who told you about the
                              green-book-by-somebody-whose-name-starts-with-P?'
                              Customer (looking befuddled): 'My mom.'
                              Ailei: 'And what kind of books does your mom like to read?'
                              Customer: 'Mysteries!' (like he's so proud of himself)
                              Ailei: 'Ah. You want a Mystery by an author with the last name P, I'll bet!'
                              (drags slack-jawed customer to Mystery section--rummages through the P's)
                              'Aha! Here, this is the one you want.' (sends him off happily with a copy of
                              Richard North Patterson's _Escape the Night_)

                              It had a green cover, don't ya know.

                              I agree, loved the books, had to shake my head over the people. Even though
                              when I unpacked 'The Dummies' Guide to Sex' even the books started to lose
                              their appeal <g>.

                              Ailei
                            • Rie Sheridan
                              It s S. Morgenstern, actually...and did you ever read his other book? The __________ Gondoliers? I can t remember what goes in the middle. I always wished that
                              Message 14 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                                It's S. Morgenstern, actually...and did you ever read his
                                other book? The __________ Gondoliers? I can't remember
                                what goes in the middle. I always wished that Goldman would
                                come out with the expanded version of the WHOLE story...if
                                for no other reason than to shut people up...lol

                                --- Andrea Chavez <achavez47@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > > Then there was the
                                > > one customer who came in demanding to know how she
                                > > could get a copy
                                > > of the AUTHENTIC version of the book, and who
                                > > refused to believe me
                                > > that the one sold here wasn't the US version. I
                                > > finally told her (in
                                > > a very polite voice, I might add) that the only way
                                > > she could
                                > > absolutely, positively get a British version was to
                                > > buy it from a
                                > > store in Britian. She, of course, left in a huff.
                                > >
                                > > Boy am I glad I don't work in a bookstore anymore.
                                > > Loved the books,
                                > > wished the customers would go away... ;)
                                >
                                > HAHAHAHAHAAHAH --oh my god, that is is
                                > I had a damn hard time convincing a customer that
                                > there was actually no "original" version of The
                                > Princess Bride by G. Morgenstern. William Goldman
                                > just made it all up!! it is FICTION!! :-) I can't
                                > remember how I finally managed it...I think I had
                                > about six other people in the store who all agreed
                                > that that was true and The Princess Bride is just
                                > that!
                                >
                                > Clauda -- tell the Menopause story -- that one still
                                > cracks me up.
                                >
                                > Andrea -- who liked the tag line from Clerks "Just
                                > because we help you, doesn't mean we like you."
                                >
                                > :-)
                                >
                                >
                                > =====
                                > Andrea C
                                >
                                > "I always pass on good advice,
                                > It's the only thing to do with it" --Oscar Wilde
                                >
                                > __________________________________________________
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                                >


                                =====
                                Rie Sheridan http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/riesheridan
                                RIEVISIONS and DANCING ON THE EDGE-SunnySide Up Publishing
                                THE BLOOD THAT BINDS-12/3/01 from NovelBooks,Inc.
                                THE LUTE AND THE LIAR-6/10/02 http://novelbooksinc.com
                                THE RIGHT HAND OF VELACHAZ-Fall 2002 from LTD Books


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                              • claudia wohlfeil
                                ... A woman comes into the store looking for a particular book on menopause. I show her the selection and she is insistent that I m not showing her the right
                                Message 15 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                                  > Clauda -- tell the Menopause story -- that one still
                                  > cracks me up.
                                  >

                                  A woman comes into the store looking for a particular
                                  book on menopause. I show her the selection and she
                                  is insistent that I'm not showing her the right books.
                                  She says to me, no joke, "these can't be the right
                                  books, these are for men." No, I say they are for
                                  women going through menopause. Her reply? "M E N
                                  spells men....these are for men" Okay....I don't know
                                  of any other way to spell menopause without using MEN
                                  at the beginning. At that point I just had to shake
                                  my head and walk away.

                                  Claudia






                                  > Andrea -- who liked the tag line from Clerks "Just
                                  > because we help you, doesn't mean we like you."
                                  >
                                  > :-)
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > =====
                                  > Andrea C
                                  >
                                  > "I always pass on good advice,
                                  > It's the only thing to do with it" --Oscar Wilde
                                  >
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                                • whetner@yahoo.com
                                  Oooh that s a good one. I ve got more stories, but they re mostly like Ailei s: What do you mean that you can t find this book that was on the radio but that
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                                    Oooh that's a good one. I've got more stories, but they're mostly
                                    like Ailei's: "What do you mean that you can't find this book that
                                    was on the radio but that I don't know what the name was, who the
                                    author was, or what it was about?!?!"

                                    I do have another unusual one... There was a teenager who started
                                    coming into the store and always asked about Fantasy. (Since I was
                                    the only one who read it, all the other booksellers would fob these
                                    types of customers onto me.) He'd ask for new reading suggestions and
                                    I would spend 15 minutes with him. Then he would either leave or buy
                                    other books that I didn't even recommend. I don't even think that he
                                    bought one book that I pointed out to him. The really funny thing
                                    about this guy happened not long after I quit. I was in the store to
                                    say hi to my former co-workers and to look longingly at the books
                                    when the guy comes up to me and tries to get me to help him. I told
                                    him that I didn't work there anymore and he got offended that I would
                                    dare to quit. I think he was more shocked than my regular customers
                                    whom I had known for 5 years!


                                    --- In Flewelling@y..., claudia wohlfeil <candwwohlfeil@y...> wrote:
                                    > A woman comes into the store looking for a particular
                                    > book on menopause. I show her the selection and she
                                    > is insistent that I'm not showing her the right books.
                                    > She says to me, no joke, "these can't be the right
                                    > books, these are for men." No, I say they are for
                                    > women going through menopause. Her reply? "M E N
                                    > spells men....these are for men" Okay....I don't know
                                    > of any other way to spell menopause without using MEN
                                    > at the beginning. At that point I just had to shake
                                    > my head and walk away.
                                    >
                                    > Claudia
                                  • Megara
                                    Hehee.. I m looking for David Coperfield, that s c-o-p-e-r-f-i-e-l-d. By Edmund Wells. ::snicker:: I actually liked working in a bookstore..I didn t get
                                    Message 17 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                                      Hehee.. "I'm looking for David Coperfield, that's c-o-p-e-r-f-i-e-l-d. By
                                      Edmund Wells." ::snicker:: I actually liked working in a bookstore..I
                                      didn't get *that* many moronic customers, and when the dumb ones came in,
                                      my manager would handle it because *somehow* she could just figure out
                                      exactly what book-with-a-green-cover-by-somebody-P the customer was
                                      talking about. She had mad book skillz. ^^;

                                      Megara

                                      > >
                                      > > Boy am I glad I don't work in a bookstore anymore. Loved the books,
                                      > > wished the customers would go away... ;)
                                      >


                                      =====
                                      Sub Persona // Under the Mask.. http://subpersona.cjb.net
                                      **
                                      Almighty Kupo: what in the foo is a rai-kirah anyway
                                      XMimiTachikawaX: rai-kirah = demon
                                      XMimiTachikawaX: ezzarians/wardens = wusses with mirrors
                                      Megara133: we ezzarians (shut up jackie!!) will defeat you!

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                                    • Stephen Morse
                                      ... Hey! Dr. Ruth did a good job with that one!
                                      Message 18 of 29 , Oct 2, 2001
                                        > -----Original Message-----
                                        > From: Ailei [mailto:ailei@...]
                                        > Sent: Tuesday, October 02, 2001 12:01 PM
                                        > To: Flewelling@yahoogroups.com
                                        > Subject: Re: [Flewelling] Re: OT: LOTR thoughts

                                        > I agree, loved the books, had to shake my head over the people.
                                        > Even though
                                        > when I unpacked 'The Dummies' Guide to Sex' even the books started to lose
                                        > their appeal <g>.

                                        Hey! Dr. Ruth did a good job with that one!
                                      • HBrown9628@aol.com
                                        In a message dated 10/2/01 2:27:39 PM GMT Daylight Time, Leafmirror@aol.com ... You know I never really noticed if they d altered BDT, I m so used to American
                                        Message 19 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                          In a message dated 10/2/01 2:27:39 PM GMT Daylight Time, Leafmirror@...
                                          writes:


                                          >
                                          > --- In Flewelling@y..., Rie Sheridan <riewrites1@y...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > > I haven't gotten that far yet--I'm only just now starting
                                          > > the series...Harry just got to the school--but it seems to
                                          > > me that there is a difference between a "misprint" and a
                                          > > "revision"...changing "philosopher" to "sorceror" is a
                                          > > bigger editorial choice than misspelling the word. Have you
                                          > > had any similar changes requested, Lynn? (Trying to insert
                                          > > a modicum of on-topic into our discussion...lol)
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > No. Apparently American translates better into UK English than the
                                          > reverse. ;-) I also think that since I grew up reading mostly Brit
                                          > Lit, that my writing style bridges the two.


                                          You know I never really noticed if they'd altered BDT, I'm so used to
                                          American books just being published over here without alteration, the Oxford
                                          English dictionary accepts American spellings as ok you see.

                                          >
                                          > But perhaps I should put that out for our Brit/Australian readers here.
                                          > Do I scan particularly "American"?


                                          No... but then you don't write the sort of fiction where Americanisms stand
                                          out, while there are a few grammatical differences between US and UK English
                                          it's mainly the differences in word meanings that people mostly notice, and
                                          that's more noticeable in contemporary fiction really. Mobile/cell phones,
                                          taps/faucets etc.

                                          Helen

                                          >
                                          > Lynn
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          >




                                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        • dangelle@hotmail.com
                                          ... to ... the Oxford ... I noticed while reading BDT that the UK spelling was used. I remember wondering if that was usual. I know I ve read plenty of books
                                          Message 20 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                            --- In Flewelling@y..., HBrown9628@a... wrote:
                                            >
                                            > You know I never really noticed if they'd altered BDT, I'm so used
                                            to
                                            > American books just being published over here without alteration,
                                            the Oxford
                                            > English dictionary accepts American spellings as ok you see.
                                            >
                                            > >

                                            I noticed while reading BDT that the UK spelling was used. I
                                            remember wondering if that was usual. I know I've read plenty of
                                            books by UK authors where the spelling wasn't Americanized.




                                            >
                                            > but then you don't write the sort of fiction where Americanisms
                                            stand
                                            > out, while there are a few grammatical differences between US and
                                            UK English
                                            > it's mainly the differences in word meanings that people mostly
                                            notice, and
                                            > that's more noticeable in contemporary fiction really. Mobile/cell
                                            phones,
                                            > taps/faucets etc.
                                            >

                                            This brings me back to Tolkien. In my Hobbit there is a scene where
                                            Bilbo "tucks his hand behind his braces" that I totally never got.
                                            In my mind I kept thinking he was putting his finger or even his
                                            whole hand in his mouth which I thought was odd considering he was
                                            smoking a pipe at the time. Well, I thought it odd regardless. It
                                            wasn't until many years later that I discovered 'braces' was the word
                                            Americans used for 'suspenders'. Ah, that made much more sense! I
                                            can't tell you the sense of triumph I felt at clearing up that little
                                            mystery.

                                            Angelle
                                          • Rie Sheridan
                                            Well, I thought it odd regardless. It wasn t until many years later that I discovered braces was the word Americans used for suspenders .
                                            Message 21 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                              Well, I thought it odd regardless. It wasn't until many
                                              years later that I discovered 'braces' was the word
                                              Americans used for 'suspenders'.

                                              Actually..."braces" is the BRITISH word...we Americans use
                                              "suspenders"....

                                              Rie

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                                            • dangelle@hotmail.com
                                              ... LOL! Thanks. I KNEW there was something wrong with that sentence. I read it over a couple of times and just couldn t figure out what was bothering me.
                                              Message 22 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                                --- In Flewelling@y..., Rie Sheridan <riewrites1@y...> wrote:
                                                > Well, I thought it odd regardless. It wasn't until many
                                                > years later that I discovered 'braces' was the word
                                                > Americans used for 'suspenders'.
                                                >
                                                > Actually..."braces" is the BRITISH word...we Americans use
                                                > "suspenders"....
                                                >
                                                > Rie

                                                LOL! Thanks. I KNEW there was something wrong with that sentence. I
                                                read it over a couple of times and just couldn't figure out what was
                                                bothering me.

                                                Angelle
                                              • HBrown9628@aol.com
                                                In a message dated 10/3/01 4:37:07 PM GMT Daylight Time, riewrites1@yahoo.com ... And suspenders is the British word for those things that hold up ladies
                                                Message 23 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                                  In a message dated 10/3/01 4:37:07 PM GMT Daylight Time, riewrites1@...
                                                  writes:


                                                  >
                                                  > Well, I thought it odd regardless. It wasn't until many
                                                  > years later that I discovered 'braces' was the word
                                                  > Americans used for 'suspenders'.
                                                  >
                                                  > Actually..."braces" is the BRITISH word...we Americans use
                                                  > "suspenders"....
                                                  >
                                                  > Rie
                                                  >
                                                  >

                                                  And suspenders is the British word for those things that hold up ladies
                                                  stockings <eg>... and cause of much merriment when reading US stories with
                                                  liberal use of the word in question. Big macho men and their suspenders <
                                                  giggle>, we just imagine Frank n' Furter & co... not quite the intended
                                                  effect...

                                                  Helen


                                                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                • Andrea Chavez
                                                  I finally got slang at the tender age of nine when the traveling baker would sell us bread and things at our home in Manchester and he would leave with a
                                                  Message 24 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                                    I finally "got" slang at the tender age of nine when
                                                    the traveling baker would sell us bread and things at
                                                    our home in Manchester and he would leave with a smile
                                                    and say to my mom. "I'll knock you up on Thursday!"
                                                    My brothers laughed and laughed and laughed and even
                                                    at nine I knew that "knock you up" meant "I'll see you
                                                    get pregnant" NOT -- I'll come around with my baked
                                                    goods again.

                                                    Then there was the time my brother wanted a pair of
                                                    climbing knickers!! HAHAHAHAHA

                                                    Andrea

                                                    --- Rie Sheridan <riewrites1@...> wrote:
                                                    > Well, I thought it odd regardless. It wasn't until
                                                    > many
                                                    > years later that I discovered 'braces' was the word
                                                    > Americans used for 'suspenders'.
                                                    >
                                                    > Actually..."braces" is the BRITISH word...we
                                                    > Americans use
                                                    > "suspenders"....
                                                    >
                                                    > Rie
                                                    >
                                                    > __________________________________________________
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                                                    =====
                                                    Andrea C

                                                    "I always pass on good advice,
                                                    It's the only thing to do with it" --Oscar Wilde

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                                                  • Megara
                                                    ... say suspenders ? I ve *always* said suspenders ... Megara (one puzzled American) ... ===== Sub Persona // Under the Mask.. http://subpersona.cjb.net **
                                                    Message 25 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                                      ::delurk:: Don't you mean that British people use 'braces' and Americans
                                                      say 'suspenders'? I've *always* said 'suspenders'...

                                                      Megara (one puzzled American)

                                                      > It
                                                      > wasn't until many years later that I discovered 'braces' was the word
                                                      > Americans used for 'suspenders'. Ah, that made much more sense! I
                                                      > can't tell you the sense of triumph I felt at clearing up that little
                                                      > mystery.
                                                      >
                                                      > Angelle
                                                      >


                                                      =====
                                                      Sub Persona // Under the Mask.. http://subpersona.cjb.net
                                                      **
                                                      Andie4545: I hope he never "got off" (lol that sounds so weird) to magic cards when he was saying it was me....what a diss? ya know? to not be as arousing as a deck of cards?!
                                                      **
                                                      Almighty Kupo: ooouayakalll
                                                      Almighty Kupo: i was trying to say scissors
                                                      Almighty Kupo: i failed

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                                                    • Rie Sheridan
                                                      ... merriment when reading US stories with liberal use of the word in question. Big macho men and their suspenders
                                                      Message 26 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                                        --- HBrown9628@... wrote:
                                                        > And suspenders is the British word for those things that
                                                        > hold up ladies stockings <eg>... and cause of much
                                                        merriment when reading US stories with liberal use of the
                                                        word in question. Big macho men and their suspenders <
                                                        > giggle>, we just imagine Frank n' Furter & co... not
                                                        > quite the intended effect...
                                                        >
                                                        > Helen


                                                        Now THAT, I didn't know! LOL

                                                        =====
                                                        Rie Sheridan http://www.angelfire.com/tx5/riesheridan
                                                        RIEVISIONS and DANCING ON THE EDGE-SunnySide Up Publishing
                                                        THE BLOOD THAT BINDS-12/3/01 from NovelBooks,Inc.
                                                        THE LUTE AND THE LIAR-6/10/02 http://novelbooksinc.com
                                                        THE RIGHT HAND OF VELACHAZ-Fall 2002 from LTD Books


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                                                      • Lynn
                                                        ... Thanks to the Monty Python Lumberjack song, I did. ;-)
                                                        Message 27 of 29 , Oct 3, 2001
                                                          --- In Flewelling@y..., Rie Sheridan <riewrites1@y...> wrote:
                                                          >
                                                          > --- HBrown9628@a... wrote:
                                                          > > And suspenders is the British word for those things that
                                                          > > hold up ladies stockings <eg>... and cause of much
                                                          > merriment when reading US stories with liberal use of the
                                                          > word in question. Big macho men and their suspenders <
                                                          > > giggle>, we just imagine Frank n' Furter & co... not
                                                          > > quite the intended effect...
                                                          > >
                                                          > > Helen
                                                          >
                                                          >
                                                          > Now THAT, I didn't know! LOL


                                                          Thanks to the Monty Python "Lumberjack" song, I did. ;-)
                                                        • u01wmd
                                                          Yeah - I think it s that way around, because in the UK, suspenders are what you use to keep stockings up. Imagine my amusement when this bloke goes on about
                                                          Message 28 of 29 , Oct 4, 2001
                                                            Yeah - I think it's that way around, because in the UK, suspenders are what you use to keep stockings up. Imagine my amusement when this bloke goes on about his suspenders being uncomfortable...

                                                            Wendy x

                                                            ::delurk:: Don't you mean that British people use 'braces' and Americans
                                                            say 'suspenders'? I've *always* said 'suspenders'...

                                                            Megara (one puzzled American)

                                                            > It
                                                            > wasn't until many years later that I discovered 'braces' was the word
                                                            > Americans used for 'suspenders'. Ah, that made much more sense! I
                                                            > can't tell you the sense of triumph I felt at clearing up that little
                                                            > mystery.
                                                            >
                                                            > Angelle
                                                            >


                                                            =====
                                                            Sub Persona // Under the Mask.. http://subpersona.cjb.net
                                                            **
                                                            Andie4545: I hope he never "got off" (lol that sounds so weird) to magic cards when he was saying it was me....what a diss? ya know? to not be as arousing as a deck of cards?!
                                                            **
                                                            Almighty Kupo: ooouayakalll
                                                            Almighty Kupo: i was trying to say scissors
                                                            Almighty Kupo: i failed

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                                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                                          • Stephen Morse
                                                            ... My favority UKism right now is snogging. I have no idea where it came from, but it means kissing.
                                                            Message 29 of 29 , Oct 4, 2001
                                                              > -----Original Message-----
                                                              > From: u01wmd [mailto:u01wmd@...]
                                                              > Sent: Thursday, October 04, 2001 7:51 AM
                                                              > To: Flewelling@yahoogroups.com
                                                              > Subject: Re: [Flewelling] Re: OT: LOTR thoughts
                                                              >
                                                              >
                                                              > Yeah - I think it's that way around, because in the UK,
                                                              > suspenders are what you use to keep stockings up. Imagine my
                                                              > amusement when this bloke goes on about his suspenders being
                                                              > uncomfortable...

                                                              My favority UKism right now is snogging. I have no idea where it came from,
                                                              but it means kissing.
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