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New Bookitis

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  • flewelling.lynn
    Starting a new book is like starting a three needle mitten. The first rows are awkward and prone to dropped stitches, tangles, and twists, But once you get
    Message 1 of 39 , Aug 21 12:18 PM
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      Starting a new book is like starting a three needle mitten. The first rows are awkward and prone to dropped stitches, tangles, and twists, But once you get past those, everything begins to pull together and take shape. I haven't reached that point yet with the new book. Still trying to keep those needles straight!
    • Wendy Williams
      Replying to what is left below. I think this is what I was trying to get at. Sometimes it feels like a Character, be they a main character or a minor, or a
      Message 39 of 39 , Aug 29 2:22 PM
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        Replying to what is left below.

        I think this is what I was trying to get at. Sometimes it feels like a
        Character, be they a main character or a minor, or a major minor
        character has to die to make things better. Granted it's not all the
        time, but it's some times it does. (Like Dumbeldore and Sirius's
        death, using Harry Potter for example again.)

        To me it seems that most people see death of main characters as okay
        in movies, TV shows or Games, more then they see it as okay in books,
        which to me is kind of odd considering all Books, Movies, TV shows and
        games are fall under the same category as away to escape from reality.


        This has been bought to you by Wednesday

        My Web site: http://web.me.com/wwnwil1986/myWorld-wen/My_world.html



        On 29/08/2009, at 11:55 PM, Angie Fiedler Sutton wrote:

        > "I think the death of main (or major minor) characters can actually
        > lead to plot lines that you would've never had otherwise. For those
        > of you who've seen Buffy the Vampire Slayer TV series, you know
        > exactly what I mean: there's a whole plotline in the 6th season that
        > couldn't happen had one major/minor character not died.
        >
        > I know when I was writing myself, there was a time in writing one
        > story where it hit me that one of my characters was going to die.
        > Yes, it was as much of a surprise to me as it was to them. But the
        > story lent itself to the death. I fought the idea, and tried writing
        > around it, and ended up being worse of a story when I forced the
        > character to live.
        >
        > So, to sum up: sometimes the story needs the death, just like it
        > needs the romance: it makes it 'satisfying'.
        >
        > As always, just my two bits,
        >
        > Angie
        >
        >
        >



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