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Re: [Flewelling] Re: was: reading speed (or soemthing)

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  • Dale & Veronica Albers
    I hate it when modern slang is used in fantasy books, I find it rips me out of the moment. It is so much better when authors come up with their own slang and
    Message 1 of 23 , Jun 3, 2008
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      I hate it when modern slang is used in fantasy books, I find it rips me out of the moment. It is so much better when authors come up with their own slang and curses. It was one of the things that impressed me Luck in the Shadows.. Son of a rusty whore, is forever stuck in my mind.

      Veronica
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Brenda
      To: Flewelling@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2008 3:11 PM
      Subject: Re: [Flewelling] Re: was: reading speed (or soemthing)


      oh I hate it when curse words are overused whether it's spoken or written in a book. There are so many better ways to express yourself when your upset then to say the F word every 5 seconds, or in the case of a book every other sentence etc.

      ----- Original Message -----
      From: noerml
      To: Flewelling@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2008 11:21 AM
      Subject: [Flewelling] Re: was: reading speed (or soemthing)

      Well to give the author at least some credit... she designs a very
      religious patriacharic society, so "rutting the she-brat" does fit
      into her design. (most women do not get names, neither do the many
      slaves) Like everything else actually sorta fits in. However, her
      image is a distorted one to begin. Every 2 pages you read of plight
      and "Browning land"... and in between 2000 bulls are sacrificed cuz
      the great-grand-nice of the warlod has a hick-up.
      Or a slave trader caravan sacrifices gold offerings every 3 pages and
      in the end gets some silver coins for all their slaves.. yay.. logic
      here i come.

      what I find particulary offensive is the regular usage of the word
      fuck. Now I can see how this fits into the story, men regarding women
      as dirt etc... but please, it makes me feel like a dimwit if the
      author thinks overusing the words "fuck" and "rut" and "spear" are a
      good way to illustrate this disregard.

      Reminds me of reading the follow-ups to Frank Herberts brilliant Dune
      novels written by his "gifted" son and some other chap i am not even
      willing to type down his name.
      Somewhere right at the begining it reads "... in light of the no-
      ship's endless wanderings, the name ithaca seemed appropriate".. so
      far so good. And then comes a whole paragraph on explaining how this
      is related to Odysseus. Which made me feel like.. yeah i am just as
      illiterate as you guys are, that explanation was so needed. If not
      for this explanation I would have sworn Odysseus's hometown, not his
      ship was called Ithaca, but now that you opened my eyes it all makes
      perfect sense *roll eyes*

      noerml

      --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "Heather" <GreatRegrub@...> wrote:
      >
      > I particularly love "rutting the she-brat." Classic! What's truly
      sad
      > is that your description of this story is so terrible, that I
      almost
      > want to read it just for the sake of witnessing the ridiculousness
      > firsthand. I'm prevented from doing so only because of the fact
      that
      > I don't want to spend the cost of a paperback novel on it, and
      > libraries freak me out.
      >
      > Heather
      >
      > --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "noerml" <noerml@> wrote:
      > >
      > > so prompted by this discussion about how much and how fast you
      > folks
      > > read I went downtown and got me some new books.
      > > Just more or less "randomly" picked books from the shelve, opened
      > them
      > > and read a page to see if i like them, and "threw" them into my
      > basket
      > > or discarded them again. (maybe not the best way, but then again,
      > > reading reviews on amazon usually doesn't pay off either)
      > >
      > > one of them was called Empress by Karen Miller, never heard of
      her
      > > before. It read "author of the innocent Mage", not that i knew
      that
      > > either, in hindsight it sounds like "from the makers of Police
      > Acedemy
      > > XXIV"
      > > I can honestly claim, that I never ever read a book that was more
      1
      > > dimensional than this one. language wise, character wise, scenery
      > wise,
      > > and plot wise. (and that is counting my own stories from 2nd
      grade)
      > >
      > > The word "god" or composita of god probably count more than 5.000
      > (it's
      > > actually like every tenth word, probably less!), every character
      > looks
      > > the "same"... it's not like mrs. miller doesn'T differentiate at
      all
      > > (though it feels like about 1 in 5 characters actually does get
      an
      > > appearance), but there's something about the way she describes
      > things
      > > that make it all sound alike. All characters have seemingly one
      > goal:
      > > to please god.. all characters do the same, pleasing god and
      > sacrifing
      > > lambs and bulls and cockerels and scorpions and snakes and doves
      > and
      > > calfs and sheep and goats and coins, and heartblood and gems, and
      > > jewels and hair and garments and knifes and swords and gold and
      > silver
      > > and copper and lambs and 5 lambs and 10 lambs and 100 lambs and
      500
      > > lambs and 10 bulls and 50 bulls and 500 bulls and... ah yeah you
      > got
      > > the idea. and if they don't try to please god, they are guided by
      > god,
      > > do gods will, or get smiten by god, or go to the temple of god,
      or
      > > speak with the clerks of god, or are on their way to see the
      clerks
      > of
      > > god, or do as the clerks of godtold them to do.
      > >
      > > Then at one point the protagonist falls in love.. no wait,...god
      > told
      > > her to mate with the warlord of the country. Sentences
      > like "plowing
      > > the furrow", "rutting the she-brat" and "his puny spear spilled
      his
      > > seed"
      > > do make that romance as entertaining to read as the ingredients
      on
      > that
      > > organic natural joghurt I had for breakfast earlier today. the
      she-
      > brat
      > > (reads as the protagonist) doesn't enjoy the plowing, but endures
      > > for "it is gods will."
      > >
      > > seriously.. i wonder how this ever got past the editor... or
      maybe
      > I am
      > > the one who is "queer" here *shrug*
      > >
      > > It truly amazes me to a point that I do want to go on, just like
      a
      > car
      > > accident you can't stop looking at.
      > >
      > > noerml
      > >
      >

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Paula Lieberman
      .. ... From: Brenda ... I read the Innocent Mage. It was okay, but was starting to get tedious. I started but stopped reading
      Message 2 of 23 , Jun 3, 2008
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        ..
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Brenda" <wolfsbabe_84@...>


        > I've never read empress so I can't say anything in regards to it. I have
        > read the Innocent Mage and rather enjoyed it. I wouldn't place it on my
        > top favorite of books but it was a good read. From the small section that
        > is in the back of the the awaken mage (which I'm currently reading) for
        > empress I can say that it does seem very different if not more harsh then
        > her first books. Not sure if I'll pick up empress especially since you
        > didn't like it. If the library has it then maybe but I won't buy it.

        I read the Innocent Mage. It was okay, but was starting to get tedious. I
        started but stopped reading the sequel to it.
        I looked at Empress and decided I wasn't interested.

        The author I suspect is British, Orbit's an imprint from a British publisher
        which started publishing over here, I think.
      • Paula Lieberman
        ... From: Dale & Veronica Albers ... It s one of the things that makes me feel that the English translation of the Crest/Banner of the
        Message 3 of 23 , Jun 3, 2008
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Dale & Veronica Albers" <dvalbers@...>


          >I hate it when modern slang is used in fantasy books, I find it rips me out
          >of the moment. It is so much better when authors come up with their own
          >slang and curses. It was one of the things that impressed me Luck in the
          >Shadows.. Son of a rusty whore, is forever stuck in my mind.

          It's one of the things that makes me feel that the English translation of
          the Crest/Banner of the Stars is so crappy....
        • Paula Lieberman
          Who wrote it? ... From: Virgínia Jansen Are there sometimes books we cannot stand, aren t ,huh? I gave up the epic Thorn, Memory and
          Message 4 of 23 , Jun 3, 2008
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            Who wrote it?

            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Virgínia Jansen" <vpjansen@...>


            Are there sometimes books we cannot stand, aren't ,huh?
            I gave up the 'epic' "Thorn, Memory and Sorrow" tretralogy after bravely
            finished the firts 3 books and really nothing, nothing changed in the main
            character demeanor, even with he being somehow linked to the most climatic
            events in that fantasy world ... call ita bad experience IMHO 'cos as for
            character's development I am pretty bad used to see Lynn's, Robin Robb's and
            GGKay's styles...
          • Jo
            Karen Miller is Australian, and we re very glad to claim her, thank you very much. Cheers, Jo (de-lurking briefly) ... publisher
            Message 5 of 23 , Jun 4, 2008
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              Karen Miller is Australian, and we're very glad to claim her, thank you
              very much.

              Cheers,
              Jo (de-lurking briefly)

              --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "Paula Lieberman" <paal@...> wrote:
              >
              > The author I suspect is British, Orbit's an imprint from a British
              publisher
              > which started publishing over here, I think.
              >
            • enicupac2
              I don t think you re a nut at all , but I wonder to what kind of library you go...I never find strange things in the books I take home ;_) and lots of books
              Message 6 of 23 , Jun 4, 2008
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                I don't think you're a nut at all , but I wonder to what kind of
                library you go...I never find strange things in the books I take
                home ;_) and lots of books are new , I'm the first one to read them ,
                I can often ask them to buy books I'd love to read ...I must have
                wonderful librarians !
                capucine--- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "Heather"
                <GreatRegrub@...> wrote:
                >
                > LOL, I just realized how I worded that. The true explanation will
                still
                > make me sound crazy, actually, but I don't mind setting the record
                > straight.
                >
                > It's not actually libraries themselves that freak me out. I
                actually
                > rather enjoy the atmosphere of being at the library. It's library
                BOOKS
                > that freak me out. There are a few reasons:
                >
                > 1) They smell funny. This is a normal thing for paper products,
                because
                > of course a lot of library books can be kind of old, they've been
                > sitting on a shelf for years, they've been touched by countless
                people,
                > and have spent time in countless places where they have probably
                picked
                > up some smells. Some people I know enjoy the smell of library books
                for
                > this very reason, but I think it's gross.
                >
                > 2) Whenever I open up library books, bits of crumbs from some now-
                > unidentifiable food come falling out of the binding. There was one
                time
                > when I was pretty sure the crumbs were from nacho cheese Doritos,
                but
                > all the rest of the times, I've been unable to figure out what the
                > crumbs really are (or were) and it just kind of makes me wrinkle up
                my
                > nose a bit.
                >
                > 3) And this is the biggy, the one that really clinches my distaste
                for
                > library books: Whenever I pick up a library book, I can't help but
                > imagine all the many, many people who have taken this book home
                with
                > them and read it on the toilet.
                >
                > So there you have it. Feel free to think I'm a total nut. Hope I
                > haven't destroyed your ability to enjoy your library books, though!
                >
                > Heather
                >
                > --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "Brenda" <wolfsbabe_84@> wrote:
                > >
                > > why do libraries freak you out if you don't mind me asking? is it
                the
                > quietness? I enjoy going to the library. I love being surrounded by
                all
                > the books.
                > >
                >
              • Virgínia Jansen
                ... I cannot remember his name for the life in me ^_^ I guess you can google it...wait, here it is: *Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn* is Tad
                Message 7 of 23 , Jun 4, 2008
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                  >
                  >
                  >

                  I cannot remember his name for the life in me ^_^' I guess you can google
                  it...wait, here it is:

                  *Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn* is Tad
                  Williams<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tad_Williams>'s
                  epic fantasy <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fantasy>
                  trilogy<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trilogy>,
                  comprising *The Dragonbone
                  Chair<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Dragonbone_Chair>
                  * (1988 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1988>), *Stone of
                  Farewell<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stone_of_Farewell>
                  * (1990 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1990>), and *To Green Angel
                  Tower<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/To_Green_Angel_Tower>
                  * (1993 <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1993>). The paperback publication of *To
                  Green Angel Tower* was divided into two volumes, so a number of Williams'
                  readers may consider *Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn* more properly called a
                  tetralogy <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetralogy> than a trilogy.
                  (my thanks for Wikipedia)

                  --
                  " 'Do you know, I always thought Unicorns were fabulous monsters, too? I
                  never saw one alive before!'
                  'Well, now that we have seen each other,' said the Unicorn, ' if you´ll
                  believe in me, I´ll believe in you' "
                  - Lewis Carroll


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Brenda
                  I don t find strange things in my books either. but then I don t take home alot of books from the library but I know the library does have some old books. but
                  Message 8 of 23 , Jun 4, 2008
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                    I don't find strange things in my books either. but then I don't take home alot of books from the library but I know the library does have some old books. but I don't think there are alot of people who check out novels at my library. I am curious though if my library would buy a new book if requested or if they mostly get donated. I've donated some books I didn't like and gave it to the library. Figured let someone else read and enjoy it rather then having it collect dust on my bookshelf.

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: enicupac2
                    To: Flewelling@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2008 1:19 AM
                    Subject: [Flewelling] Re: was: reading speed (or soemthing)


                    I don't think you're a nut at all , but I wonder to what kind of
                    library you go...I never find strange things in the books I take
                    home ;_) and lots of books are new , I'm the first one to read them ,
                    I can often ask them to buy books I'd love to read ...I must have
                    wonderful librarians !
                    capucine--- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "Heather"
                    <GreatRegrub@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > LOL, I just realized how I worded that. The true explanation will
                    still
                    > make me sound crazy, actually, but I don't mind setting the record
                    > straight.
                    >
                    > It's not actually libraries themselves that freak me out. I
                    actually
                    > rather enjoy the atmosphere of being at the library. It's library
                    BOOKS
                    > that freak me out. There are a few reasons:
                    >
                    > 1) They smell funny. This is a normal thing for paper products,
                    because
                    > of course a lot of library books can be kind of old, they've been
                    > sitting on a shelf for years, they've been touched by countless
                    people,
                    > and have spent time in countless places where they have probably
                    picked
                    > up some smells. Some people I know enjoy the smell of library books
                    for
                    > this very reason, but I think it's gross.
                    >
                    > 2) Whenever I open up library books, bits of crumbs from some now-
                    > unidentifiable food come falling out of the binding. There was one
                    time
                    > when I was pretty sure the crumbs were from nacho cheese Doritos,
                    but
                    > all the rest of the times, I've been unable to figure out what the
                    > crumbs really are (or were) and it just kind of makes me wrinkle up
                    my
                    > nose a bit.
                    >
                    > 3) And this is the biggy, the one that really clinches my distaste
                    for
                    > library books: Whenever I pick up a library book, I can't help but
                    > imagine all the many, many people who have taken this book home
                    with
                    > them and read it on the toilet.
                    >
                    > So there you have it. Feel free to think I'm a total nut. Hope I
                    > haven't destroyed your ability to enjoy your library books, though!
                    >
                    > Heather
                    >
                    > --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "Brenda" <wolfsbabe_84@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > why do libraries freak you out if you don't mind me asking? is it
                    the
                    > quietness? I enjoy going to the library. I love being surrounded by
                    all
                    > the books.
                    > >
                    >





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Brenda
                    Trudi Canavan is Australian to. She has written the black Magician Trilogy and the Age of the Five Trilogy. Good Books. ... From: Jo To:
                    Message 9 of 23 , Jun 4, 2008
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                      Trudi Canavan is Australian to. She has written the black Magician Trilogy and the Age of the Five Trilogy. Good Books.

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Jo
                      To: Flewelling@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Wednesday, June 04, 2008 12:47 AM
                      Subject: [Flewelling] Re: was: reading speed (or soemthing)


                      Karen Miller is Australian, and we're very glad to claim her, thank you
                      very much.

                      Cheers,
                      Jo (de-lurking briefly)

                      --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "Paula Lieberman" <paal@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > The author I suspect is British, Orbit's an imprint from a British
                      publisher
                      > which started publishing over here, I think.
                      >





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Heather
                      OMG, I just realized that that s not the one I started to read and then threw under the bed. But I can t remember what it was... I must be catching that
                      Message 10 of 23 , Jun 4, 2008
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                        OMG, I just realized that that's not the one I started to read and
                        then threw under the bed. But I can't remember what it was... I must
                        be catching that "unable to remember the title or author" thing!

                        Heather

                        --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "Virgínia Jansen" <vpjansen@...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                        > I cannot remember his name for the life in me ^_^' I guess you can
                        google
                        > it...wait, here it is:
                        >
                        > *Memory, Sorrow, and Thorn* is Tad
                        > Williams<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tad_Williams>'s
                        > epic fantasy <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fantasy>
                        > trilogy<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trilogy>,
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