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OT: Why people over 35 should be dead

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  • lynn_flewelling
    A friend sent this to my husband. It s not meant in any way as a slight to anyone under 35. I just liked it because it caught so many elements of my kidhood.
    Message 1 of 10 , Jul 5, 2004
      A friend sent this to my husband. It's not meant in any way as a slight to
      anyone under 35. I just liked it because it caught so many elements of my
      kidhood. ;-)

      ________


      People over 35 should be dead.

      Here's why.

      According to today's regulators
      and bureaucrats, those of us
      who were kids in the 40's,
      50's, 60's, or even maybe
      the early 70's probably
      Shouldn't have survived.

      Our baby cribs were covered
      with bright colored lead-based
      Paint.

      We had no childproof lids
      on medicine bottles, doors
      or cabinets, ... and when we
      rode our bikes, we had no
      Helmets.
      (Not to mention the risks
      We took hitchhiking.)

      As children, we would ride
      in cars with no seatbelts

      or air bags.

      Riding in the back of a pickup
      truck on a warm day was
      Always a special treat.

      We drank water from the
      garden hose and not from
      A bottle.

      Horrors!

      We ate cupcakes, bread and
      butter, and drank soda pop
      with sugar in it, but we were
      never overweight because
      we were always outside
      Playing.

      We shared one soft drink
      with four friends, f rom one
      bottle, and no one actually
      Died from this.

      We would spend hours building
      our go-carts out of scraps
      and then rode down the hill,
      only to find out we forgot
      The brakes.

      After running into the bushes
      a few times, we learned to
      Solve the problem.

      We would leave home in the
      morning and play all day,
      as long as we were back
      when the street lights
      Came on.

      No one was able to
      Reach us all day.

      NO CELL PHONES!!!!!

      U n t h i n k a b l e !

      We did not have Playstations,
      Nintendo 64, X-Boxes, no
      video games at all, no 99
      channels on cable, video
      tape movies, surround
      sound, personal cell phones,
      personal computers, or Internet
      chat rooms.

      We had friends!

      We went outside and found
      Them.

      We played dodge ball, and
      sometimes, the ball would
      Really hurt.

      We fell out of trees, got
      cut and broke bones and
      teeth, and there were no
      Lawsui ts from these accidents.

      They were accidents.

      No one was to blame but us.

      Remember accidents?

      We had fights and punched
      each other and got black and blue and learned to get
      Over it.

      We made up games with
      sticks and tennis balls and
      ate worms, and although we
      were told it would happen,
      we did not put out very many
      eyes, nor did the worms
      Live inside us forever.

      We rode bikes or walked to
      a friend's home and knocked
      on the door, or rang the
      bell or just walked in and
      Talked to them.

      Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team.

      Those who didn't had to
      Learn to deal with disappointment.

      Some students weren't as
      smart as others, so they
      failed a grade and were
      held back to repeat the
      Same grade.

      Horrors!

      Tests were not adjusted
      For any reason.

      Our actions were our own.

      Consequences were expected.

      The idea of a parent bailing< BR>us out if we broke a law
      Was unheard of.

      They actually sided
      With the law.

      Imagine that!

      This generation has produced
      some of the best risk-takers
      and problem solvers and
      Inventors, ever.

      The past 50 years have
      been an explosion of
      innovation and new
      Ideas.

      We had freedom, failure,
      success and responsibility,
      and we learned how to deal
      With it all.
    • marg_r_w
      ... Yeah, that s doing the rounds here as well, a friend sent it to me yesterday. It reminds me of my own relatively carefree and uninhibited childhood. I
      Message 2 of 10 , Jul 5, 2004
        --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "lynn_flewelling"
        <otterdance2@a...> wrote:
        >
        Yeah, that's doing the rounds here as well, a friend sent it to me
        yesterday. It reminds me of my own relatively carefree and
        uninhibited childhood. I know my children have not enjoyed the same
        degree of freedom that I had to explore their own environment and
        boundaries and it makes you wonder if we as parents have become over
        protective or is it that society has changed so much it has required
        a higher level of protectiveness from us. Its certainly thought
        provoking.

        Marg


        A friend sent this to my husband. It's not meant in any way as a
        slight to
        > anyone under 35. I just liked it because it caught so many elements
        of my
        > kidhood. ;-)
        >
        > ________
        >
        >
        > People over 35 should be dead.
        >
        > Here's why.
        >
        > According to today's regulators
        > and bureaucrats, those of us
        > who were kids in the 40's,
        > 50's, 60's, or even maybe
        > the early 70's probably
        > Shouldn't have survived.
        >
        > Our baby cribs were covered
        > with bright colored lead-based
        > Paint.
        >
        > We had no childproof lids
        > on medicine bottles, doors
        > or cabinets, ... and when we
        > rode our bikes, we had no
        > Helmets.
        > (Not to mention the risks
        > We took hitchhiking.)
        >
        > As children, we would ride
        > in cars with no seatbelts
        >
        > or air bags.
        >
        > Riding in the back of a pickup
        > truck on a warm day was
        > Always a special treat.
        >
        > We drank water from the
        > garden hose and not from
        > A bottle.
        >
        > Horrors!
        >
        > We ate cupcakes, bread and
        > butter, and drank soda pop
        > with sugar in it, but we were
        > never overweight because
        > we were always outside
        > Playing.
        >
        > We shared one soft drink
        > with four friends, f rom one
        > bottle, and no one actually
        > Died from this.
        >
        > We would spend hours building
        > our go-carts out of scraps
        > and then rode down the hill,
        > only to find out we forgot
        > The brakes.
        >
        > After running into the bushes
        > a few times, we learned to
        > Solve the problem.
        >
        > We would leave home in the
        > morning and play all day,
        > as long as we were back
        > when the street lights
        > Came on.
        >
        > No one was able to
        > Reach us all day.
        >
        > NO CELL PHONES!!!!!
        >
        > U n t h i n k a b l e !
        >
        > We did not have Playstations,
        > Nintendo 64, X-Boxes, no
        > video games at all, no 99
        > channels on cable, video
        > tape movies, surround
        > sound, personal cell phones,
        > personal computers, or Internet
        > chat rooms.
        >
        > We had friends!
        >
        > We went outside and found
        > Them.
        >
        > We played dodge ball, and
        > sometimes, the ball would
        > Really hurt.
        >
        > We fell out of trees, got
        > cut and broke bones and
        > teeth, and there were no
        > Lawsui ts from these accidents.
        >
        > They were accidents.
        >
        > No one was to blame but us.
        >
        > Remember accidents?
        >
        > We had fights and punched
        > each other and got black and blue and learned to get
        > Over it.
        >
        > We made up games with
        > sticks and tennis balls and
        > ate worms, and although we
        > were told it would happen,
        > we did not put out very many
        > eyes, nor did the worms
        > Live inside us forever.
        >
        > We rode bikes or walked to
        > a friend's home and knocked
        > on the door, or rang the
        > bell or just walked in and
        > Talked to them.
        >
        > Little League had tryouts and not everyone made the team.
        >
        > Those who didn't had to
        > Learn to deal with disappointment.
        >
        > Some students weren't as
        > smart as others, so they
        > failed a grade and were
        > held back to repeat the
        > Same grade.
        >
        > Horrors!
        >
        > Tests were not adjusted
        > For any reason.
        >
        > Our actions were our own.
        >
        > Consequences were expected.
        >
        > The idea of a parent bailing< BR>us out if we broke a law
        > Was unheard of.
        >
        > They actually sided
        > With the law.
        >
        > Imagine that!
        >
        > This generation has produced
        > some of the best risk-takers
        > and problem solvers and
        > Inventors, ever.
        >
        > The past 50 years have
        > been an explosion of
        > innovation and new
        > Ideas.
        >
        > We had freedom, failure,
        > success and responsibility,
        > and we learned how to deal
        > With it all.
      • Grainne Moroney
        *grins* Funnily enough, I received this under the heading of why people born before 1985 should be dead , with the dates at the start altered to correspond to
        Message 3 of 10 , Jul 5, 2004
          *grins* Funnily enough, I received this under the heading of "why
          people born before 1985 should be dead", with the dates at the start
          altered to correspond to my own age group. I was born in the early
          80s, and pretty much all of this applies to my childhood too; I
          wonder when was it that things changed (apparently) so much?
        • Kc2
          marg_r_w wrote: Yeah, that s doing the rounds here as well, a friend sent it to me yesterday. It reminds me of my own relatively
          Message 4 of 10 , Jul 6, 2004
            marg_r_w <marg_r_w@...> wrote:
            Yeah, that's doing the rounds here as well, a friend sent it to me yesterday. It reminds me of my own relatively carefree and uninhibited childhood. I know my children have not enjoyed the same degree of freedom that I had to explore their own environment and boundaries and it makes you wonder if we as parents have become over protective or is it that society has changed so much it has required a higher level of protectiveness from us. Its certainly thought provoking.

            Marg


            It's nice (if that's the right word) to know others feel the same way as I do. I have two boys, now 18 and 11, who spent most of their lives in one military community or another, almost exclusively living within the boundries of the installations themselves. When we moved to a civilian neighborhood three years ago, I had a real problem with feeling safe enough to let them explore and enjoy their new environment, but eventually did learn to do so without being constantly stressed. Mostly. When we lived on post, I rarely gave their safety much thought, despite the fact they were free to spend their entire days outside. And that's where they were - outside. I KNEW they were safe. And I knew that no matter where they were, there were other parents who had an eye on them and weren't afraid to discipline them if necessary.

            Now they spend more time indoors, playing their dog gone video games, even though we have a very nice swimming pool right out the sliding glass door of our apartment. Of course, they have fewer friends here than they did in Ft. Knox or Ft. Polk.

            Thought provoking? Yes. The world is a little different place than it was when my friends and I spent a good half hour debating whether it was "really" dark enough to have to go home. None of us ever heard of anyone being abducted and killed when they were walking home from a slumber party, either...



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          • marg_r_w
            ... games, even though we have a very nice swimming pool right out the sliding glass door of our apartment. Of course, they have fewer friends here than they
            Message 5 of 10 , Jul 6, 2004
              --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, Kc2 <killerchuck2@y...> wrote:
              > Now they spend more time indoors, playing their dog gone video
              games, even though we have a very nice swimming pool right out the
              sliding glass door of our apartment. Of course, they have fewer
              friends here than they did in Ft. Knox or Ft. Polk.
              >
              > Thought provoking? Yes. The world is a little different place
              than it was when my friends and I spent a good half hour debating
              whether it was "really" dark enough to have to go home. None of us
              ever heard of anyone being abducted and killed when they were walking
              home from a slumber party, either...
              >
              >
              Yes, and that's the shame of it. The need to keep our children safe
              and within ear shot has led to a more restricted social contact for
              them – none of the hop on a bike and go out somewhere on your own or
              with friends, they have to be taken by a parent – and of course now
              that there is so much indoor entertainment like video games, who
              needs to go outside? Luckily your boys have been able to enjoy their
              formative years in an environment of safety and freedom. It must
              have been quite a shock for them when you moved off base.

              I don't know if others would agree, but I think that children are the
              poorer for their more restrictive lifestyles now, not having gained
              early the self confidence we seemed to have as children to be able to
              act independently and make our own decisions, not to mention missing
              out on the benefits to their imaginations of those games us "oldies"
              had to invent before television and video games did it all for them

              Marg

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            • Wendy Darling
              I m 29 and did 99% of those things too! And I m not nearly dead from any of them :) Wendy ... slight to ... of my
              Message 6 of 10 , Jul 7, 2004
                I'm 29 and did 99% of those things too! And I'm not nearly dead from
                any of them :)

                Wendy

                --- In Flewelling@yahoogroups.com, "lynn_flewelling"
                <otterdance2@a...> wrote:
                > A friend sent this to my husband. It's not meant in any way as a
                slight to
                > anyone under 35. I just liked it because it caught so many elements
                of my
                > kidhood. ;-)
              • noerml
                Oh i dunno what to say about that. See... all this might be true...but then again that s the oldest story in the book things always have been...uh..better...
                Message 7 of 10 , Jul 8, 2004
                  Oh i dunno what to say about that.

                  See... all this might be true...but then again that's the oldest
                  story in the book "things always have been...uh..better... back when
                  i was young". Hihi you know what i mean. Thing are bound to change
                  with each generation. And sometimes it's hard for us to determine
                  whether for good or bad.

                  Being over 20 now (omg am i old :P) i do actualyl have similar
                  thoughts at times...

                  Maybe i just fail to see the good things about growing up in today's
                  world.

                  noerml
                • Gnine
                  Hmm, I ve of several minds on this...having just passed my 21st birthday last week...some of those things *I* certainly did, and then some of those things HAVE
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jul 10, 2004
                    Hmm, I've of several minds on this...having just passed my 21st
                    birthday last week...some of those things *I* certainly did, and then
                    some of those things HAVE saved a lot more lives...I mean one looks
                    back two hundred years...how did people survive without electricity?
                    Cars? etc. And then some things aren't the time...but the place, which
                    I also find really interesting.

                    I just returned from a five month stay in Japan, and there were a few
                    things, such as NO ONE rides with Helmets and LOTS of peole ride
                    bikes, everywhere, or the fact that I was seeing 5 year old
                    children...alone...on the Tokyo or Osaka subways...at rush hour.

                    I think its in some ways sad and in many ways neat and/or exciting how
                    things change and how much of it is perspective...for example, i'm
                    only 21, but my parents were verrrry carefree, very much about go
                    outside and enjoy nature, read, didn't buy us video games, etc. and I
                    did many of the things on that list...and then some things, by just
                    picking up and moving to another country, I covered more of the things
                    there, like riding with no helmet...which was sooo strange at first
                    because when I was young I DID have to ride with one...

                    Funny how place and time and perspective work like that, ne?

                    Jeannine
                  • Minako
                    ... From: Gnine ... I have to agree. *LOL* I never did many of those things... because in Spain we don´t do those things and never did
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jul 12, 2004
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: "Gnine" <jmk69@...>


                      > Funny how place and time and perspective work like that, ne?
                      >
                      > Jeannine
                      I have to agree. *LOL* I never did many of those things... because in
                      Spain we don´t do those things and never did them. And then other things are
                      still done (TV says we shouldn´t but try to stop a kid from sharing his
                      Coke).

                      IMO some things can´t be done anymore because cities have changed and, lets
                      face it, you can´t allow kids play in street all day long in a big city.
                      Other things are just stupid and more harmfull than good.
                      I don´t know about other places. But here half the food and cleaning
                      products are anti-bacteries, anti-blabla, anti-whatever... lot´s of stuff
                      killing things that have always been there and never killed us... I can´t
                      stop thinking that being too protected actually makes us weaker and not
                      stronger.

                      Japan, of course, is different. I never noticed about helmets. But I did
                      noticed about the kids alone on subway... I will look for the helmet thing
                      anyway. ^^; Now I´m curious.

                      BTW, any news on the japanesse edition? Will it be out for August or it´s
                      still too soon? I have no idea of how long this things takes to be
                      translated and published.

                      Minako.
                    • Trevor
                      Being young, I would say that around thirty or forty percent of the list applied to my childhood as well. On the restrictiveness issue, my parents never gave
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jul 12, 2004
                        Being young, I would say that around thirty or forty percent of the
                        list applied to my childhood as well. On the restrictiveness issue,
                        my parents never gave me restriction, just so long as I left a note
                        or something, I could hop on my bike and go wherever, usually with my
                        friends. Thinking back, I always think how worried I would be if I
                        had a child and let him/her live the way my parents let me, but it's
                        a great way to grow up. My mom always tries to get me to wear a
                        helmet, but it broke and I don't wear it anymore when I bikeride.
                        By the way, Lynn, do you think there will ever be a list of your
                        publishers on your website? That way it would be easier to find
                        information about foreign editions, which I want to collect =)
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