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Re: Where are we with flash on mobile devices right now?

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  • Peter Moelker
    I believe the future of Flash on Mobile lies on the mobile web, not in app. stores. It s expected that there will be more mobile than normal web connections.
    Message 1 of 16 , Apr 23 4:27 AM
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      I believe the future of Flash on Mobile lies on the mobile web, not in app. stores. It's expected that there will be more mobile than "normal" web connections. Flash, with it's cross-platform possibilities, has the potential to greatly enhance a mobile website with video, games, applications, interactivity, etc.

      Currently we are receiving great responses to our products and are talking with quite some big international brands. But... monetizing will still be a big challenge as most of this will be free content (for the end-user).

      --- In FlashLite@yahoogroups.com, Dale Rankine <dale@...> wrote:
      >
      > I used to think the same way Dan, about Adobe needing to be involved in the
      > development of the ecosystem rather than just the tools. But in the current
      > mobile landscape, where the OEMS are having less of an impact than the
      > platform owners (and I mean the BASE platform, not runtimes that sit on top)
      > on what developers do, I don't know if Adobe has any chance of doing any
      > more in helping create an ecosystem than they have before. They're too
      > reliant on a Google or Apple to make it happen, unlike what they have
      > achieved in the browser or the desktop.
      >
      > Flash on mobile has always been a case of not delivering on expectations
      > they have built up, and I fear that there's no real answer to the problem.
      > God knows we've tried.
      >
      > Dale.
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > On Fri, Apr 23, 2010 at 8:51 AM, Dan Milward <dan@...> wrote:
      >
      > >
      > >
      > > Nicely put Dale.
      > >
      > > So again though it comes back to Adobe providing their developers not just
      > > the tools to make quality content, but an outlet to sell their content.
      > >
      > > So. Scrap the Open Screen fund and get the market ready for us. Adobe need
      > > to collaborate with Google before they too go evil.. shame on your Steve
      > > "bill" Jobs!!!
      > >
      > > Ciao,
      > > Dan
      > >
      > > On Fri, Apr 23, 2010 at 10:33 AM, Dale Rankine <dale@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >> Well said Stefan, and I think it's great that you guys have carved out
      > >> a business model that works for you and the platform. It's a testament
      > >> to your creative talent as well as business tenacity. You guys are
      > >> rock stars to me :)
      > >>
      > >> Unfortunately for most, Flash won't offer the "mass monetization"
      > >> goals and expectations they have for their mobile apps now, thanks to
      > >> the customer experience success of Apple. Because after all, take all
      > >> the techy stuff out and it's a question of who can create the best
      > >> customer experience. Adobe and Nokia haven't been able to nail it.
      > >> Android hasn't had a great start either. Apple nailed it. Look where
      > >> the developers went (even though when they get there, many don't like
      > >> the rules of the game Apple make you play, and find that the pot of
      > >> gold still eludes them).
      > >>
      > >> Get the customer experience right, then developers have an audience
      > >> wanting product. Supply and demand.
      > >>
      > >> Dale.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> On Thursday, April 22, 2010, Stefan Wessels <stefan@...>
      > >> wrote:
      > >> >
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      > >> > Hi Paul
      > >> >
      > >> > I think the Flash platform has
      > >> > definitely become much less attractive with the release of the
      > >> > iPhone/SDK and recent moves by Adobe/Nokia. It has set a new standard
      > >> > that has let most other mobile SDK's look dated and irrelevant. Not
      > >> > only Flash, but Symbian,C++, Java, all the other "traditional"
      > >> > languages have taken a hit (Palm's 1million developer challenge has
      > >> > had to extend their deadline for lack of entries), Java development
      > >> > teams are shutting down all over the place and with Apple still
      > >> > owning 99% of the mobile applications market, in some ways these
      > >> > companies will never ever catch up (e.g. if you have a legacy of 5
      > >> > years and 200 devices across one OS - come on impossible to erase all
      > >> > your previous mistakes + your traditional deals with operators binds
      > >> > you to older, less consumer-friendly business models). This means
      > >> > that if you are starting out today, you will be hard pressed to find
      > >> > a better first platform than iPhone.
      > >> >
      > >> > I think one positive
      > >> > though for contenders in all of this, is that iPhone apps have
      > >> > created an expectation from the market. Before the iPhone the general
      > >> > public couldn't even imagine what the experience of a cool mobile app
      > >> > is like and why they would want it, Apple has created a need, and
      > >> > this need filters down to all markets. We can already see that our
      > >> > players in third world countries with basic Flash Lite phones want to
      > >> > have more "iPhone-like" experiences.
      > >> >
      > >> > For us that are
      > >> > currently actively involved & survived developing Flash Lite, (we
      > >> > mourn every day for all the many talented and passionate Flash Liters
      > >> > that had to change their business plan/leave Flash Lite market),
      > >> > it's actually a pretty good time now. The boom of real money making /
      > >> > stable mobile applications stores (Appstore 100%) has meant that
      > >> > things like mobile advertising and services on monetizing mobile
      > >> > content is much more evolved based on the money that has iPhone has
      > >> > brought into the market (AdMob Flash Lite SDK finally released).
      > >> > There is actually much more of a business case for Flash Lite today
      > >> > than ever before, even though most of the new brightest minds in
      > >> > mobile are now firmly in Apple/Android land, and when looking back at
      > >> > the fragmented/screw the developer minefield that is the Nokia/Adobe
      > >> > Flash Lite strategy, I don't think they will go down far down that
      > >> > road before deciding to get someone else to do it or abandon it all
      > >> > together.
      > >> >
      > >> > We as Flash Lite developers have gotten used to
      > >> > basically having to fend for ourselves/fear the worst, and when we
      > >> > have our daily "normal" struggles with Flash Lite player
      > >> > version bugs, many device incompatibilities, explaining to technology
      > >> > providers how their technology actually works in real life,
      > >> > device/sdk/firmware/packaging glitches (get this Nokia doesn't even
      > >> > know how to package for some of their own phones), complete lack of
      > >> > support, I smile because I know that very few serious developers that
      > >> > have worked with the either the Android or iPhone SDK will ever put
      > >> > up/accept the current level of complexity for developing/getting
      > >> > Flash content out on devices. For us that still know the dark arts of
      > >> > FL 1.1 and 2.x we are turning away clients every day - 50% of the
      > >> > time they should actually be doing an iPhone app. All our talented
      > >> > AS3 buddies ARE indeed learning Objective C, because they all love
      > >> > their Macbooks/OSX, they feel like they are doing something cool and
      > >> > creative again and programatically they feel it's generally going in
      > >> > a better direction than say learning Symbian (insert your latest
      > >> > other mobile OS here) or AS1/2. So there is this intellectual vacuum
      > >> > and huge market at the same time. Having to depend on Nokia or Adobe,
      > >> > or Android to make it happen is a pretty shaky combination, and not
      > >> > the best business case for someone who wants to make money today.
      > >> >
      > >> > We
      > >> > are pretty happy though to focus our Flash Lite skills strategically
      > >> > for the next 3-4 years, in some ways this is the first time we can
      > >> > really start pushing Flash Lite to the max, thanks to Apple, but as
      > >> > the dream that Adobe sold us years ago, that might never happen, and
      > >> > that is OK too.
      > >> >
      > >> > Stefan
      > >> > Stefan Wessels
      > >> > Co-Founder
      > >> > stefan@... <stefan@...?subject\x3dHi%20Stefan<http://stefan@...?subject%5Cx3dHi%20Stefan>
      > >> >
      > >> > +65 9002 0964
      > >> >
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      > >>
      > >> ------------------------------------
      > >>
      > >> Yahoo! Groups Links
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      > > --
      > > +64 21 449901
      > > www.instinct.co.nz - www.getshopped.org - www.gamemakers.co.nz
      > >
      > >
      >
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