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On this day. . .June 1st

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  • hfd82@aol.com
    1911-At six minutes to eight this cool evening Box 13 at Race and Paxton registered on the firehouse indicators.  Immediately before that workmen from the
    Message 1 of 9 , Jun 1, 2009
      1911-At six minutes to eight this cool evening Box 13 at Race and Paxton registered on the firehouse indicators.  Immediately before that workmen from the Kingan Provision Company packing house ran across the busy intersection of Second and Vine Streets and alerted the Paxton Engine No. 6.   Arriving Paxton firemen found heavy smoke issuing from a two story frame building approximately 50’ x 25.’  Fire Chief Charles Garverich struck the general alarm (2-2-2) at 8:00 p.m.     The intense smoke made operations difficult and it took three hours to bring the fire under control.  Three firemen were overcome by smoke-one seriously. Chief Garverich sprained an ankle when he was thrown to ground and a member of the Washington No. 4 was knocked unconscious by a wild hose line.  Loss was estimated at $35,000.
    • hfd82@aol.com
      1941-Box 221 at Cameron and Magnolia was struck by someone during the early morning hours of June 1, 1941. The alarm proved to be false. While standing near
      Message 2 of 9 , Jun 1, 2010
        1941-Box 221 at Cameron and Magnolia was struck by someone during the early morning hours of June 1, 1941.  The alarm proved to be false.  While standing near the Paxton Engine No. 6, which he had ridden to the alarm, paid fireman William Metzger, age 28, was struck by a fast moving car.  He was taken to Harrisburg Hospital where he died several hours later.  Fireman Metzger was the regular driver of the ambulance and at the time was living at the Paxton firehouse.  He was off duty when the incident occurred.  Fireman Metzger was survived by his parents and a brother and sister.

      • Hfd82
        1906-Just around midnight, smoke was discovered issuing from the rambling one story brick structure of the E.N. Cooper foundry and machine works in the Eighth
        Message 3 of 9 , Jun 1, 2011
          1906-Just around midnight, smoke was discovered issuing from the rambling one story brick structure of the E.N. Cooper foundry and machine works in the Eighth Ward.  Located at 130 Short Street (today’s location would be roughly a block north of Walnut Street near Commonwealth Ave.- http://www.old8thward.com/48.htm  the vacant lot to the right side of the photo-building in the background is Old City Hall Apartments)  Box 131 at Fourth and Walnut came in at 12:01 a.m. followed by Box 5 at State and Cowden turning out the entire department of twelve companies.   As the first alarm’s companies arrived, fire broke through the roof and the building was soon a mass of flames.  The fire was very spectacular and at one point it was feared radiant heat would ignite and fan the fire into a conflagration in this closely built and congested area.  For a time the buildings of the Harrisburg Power & Light Company were threatened but employees on duty there “held” the fire with a house line of hose until the department could get in service.  The Wesley Union A.M.E. Church at South Street and Tanners Alley was also threatened but firemen made a good stand and stopped the fire from spreading in this direction.  The fire was of undetermined origin but some officials leaned to the fact of a flare up of a dormant forge fire.  No loss figures were released.

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