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Ann Arbor - Huron River - HeadRace Blocked

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  • willi
    See article at http://bit.ly/StopLog DEQ officials think the headrace is exerting too much pressure on the earthen embankment that separates it from the Huron
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 2, 2009
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      See article at http://bit.ly/StopLog



      DEQ officials think the headrace is exerting too much pressure on the earthen embankment that separates it from the Huron River and could cause dangerous flooding if it is breached.


      11-1.02.jpg

      A view from above shows the new stop log placed in the Argo Dam.


      Crews installed a "stop log" this morning to stop the flow to the headrace. The stop log also will block water access for canoes and kayaks between the impoundment and the headrace, city officials said. The headrace water level is expected to drop about 3 feet over the next several days.


      City officials said all other actions, including dewatering of the headrace, are at a standstill for 90 days while the city and DEQ continue discussions to address concerns with the dam.


      The City Council has held off on taking action to make repairs to the earthen embankment identified by the DEQ. Anglin said he thinks the city will go forward with $300,000 in repairs but will hold off on a final "dam-in" or "dam-out" decision for a while.





      From: Carl Scarbro <budricko@...>
      To: EMU_Paddlers@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Mon, November 2, 2009 1:04:50 AM
      Subject: Re: [EMU_Paddlers] Huron River Restoration

       

      Are they going to remove Argo?

      On Sun, Nov 1, 2009 at 8:36 PM, willi <willi_h2o@yahoo. com> wrote:
       

      A lot of neat stuff being proposed on the Huron River in Ann Arbor

      http://bit.ly/RestoreHuronRiver


      The Argo Dam,  last renovated in 1972, ( almost 40 years ago ) is classified as
      a "high hazard potential dam," which means its failure could cause serious damage
      to surrounding homes, buildings, highways and railroads, and potentially endanger human lives.

      The city operates two canoe and kayak liveries in the city
      - the one at Argo Pond and the one in Gallup Park.
      Currently the City of Ann Arbor makes about $400,000 a year in revenue at the two locations,
      generating a $65,000 net surplus after factoring in costs.

      When Argo Dam is removed, a Third Livery could be implemented, serving
      the surrounding community by taking advantage of the portage-free trip.
      This would further increase the annual revenue for the city.

      Blue Infrastructure for waterways really is the new "green"



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