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"Resisting (In)Security, Securing Resistance" Open University event in London, 12 July

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  • Annick T.R. Wibben
    FYI - not specifically FSS, but why not add a feminist perspective?! ... From: Martin Coward Date: Mon, Jul 4, 2011 at 3:51 AM
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 4 11:57 AM
    FYI - not specifically FSS, but why not add a feminist perspective?!

    ---------- Forwarded message ----------
    From: Martin Coward <martin.coward@...>
    Date: Mon, Jul 4, 2011 at 3:51 AM
    Subject: OU event in London, 12 July
    To: BISAPPWG@...


    Resisting (In)Security, Securing Resistance

     

     

    The Open University in London, 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London, NW1 8NP

    http://www3.open.ac.uk/contact/maps.aspx?contactid=1

     

    Tuesday 12 July 2011, 12.30-18.30

     

    Event organised by the Securities Research Programme and the Postgraduate Student Group, CCIG, The Open University, http://www.open.ac.uk/ccig

     

    Security and insecurity dominate the vocabulary of social, political and economic problems. Terrorism, migration, poverty and, most recently, the financial crisis are made sense of in these terms, as forms of insecurity to be eliminated, neutralised or at least contained with the aim of achieving security. Yet, insecurity and security are not so easily separable, as governmental interventions to make secure entail their own insecurities. Paradoxically, the elimination of insecurity both works through and fosters insecurity by constituted risky and dangerous subjects alongside objects of insecurity. So how can resistance to insecurity be conceptualised, analysed and practiced? Resistance to insecurity can also subtly morph into that which it tries to resist. Resisting insecurity can become a security practice, while resistance to security gives rise to its own insecurities. What kinds of security practices emerge out of the desire to resist complex insecurities and what forms of resistance are thinkable?

     

    This workshop starts exploring this dynamics of resisting (in)security by opening the semantic, theoretical and political field of resistance through three related terms: agency, resilience and event. These are three terms that have been recently taken up in thinking resistance to insecurity.

     

    Agency has increasingly informed critical work engaging the securitisation of migration in particular, but also the intensification of security concerns about citizenship and mobility more widely. How can we think of agency in the context of resistance insecurity? What are the limits and potential drawbacks of using the language of agency? What is its political potential and how does it relate to the language of resistance?

     

    Resilience is of more recent extraction and appears to function as an alternative to both resistance and resilience. At the same time, resilience does not promise security and challenges the desire of being secure. The message of resilience theories and practices is that resistance may be not only futile, but also undesirable in a world which is increasingly imagined as inter-related complex systems. What does resilience do to our political vocabulary and our analyses of (in)security?

     

    To think events is to think ‘bare’ insecurity, insecurity devoid of attributes, insecurity in its happening. At the same time, events also place us at the heart of insecuring neoliberal practices. Can events be resisted or can they be resistance?


     

    Resisting (In)Security, Securing Resistance

    CCIG Forum 23

    Tuesday 12 July 2011

     

    The Open University in London, 1-11 Hawley Crescent, Camden Town, London, NW1 8NP

    http://www3.open.ac.uk/contact/maps.aspx?contactid=1

     

    PROGRAMME

     

    12:30-12:45     Arrival and Registration

     

    12:45-13:00     Introduction by Claudia Aradau (Open University, CCIG) & Raia Prokhovnik (Open University, CCIG)

     

    13:00-14:45     Migration and agency

     

    Olga Jubany (University of Barcelona) Constructing truths in a culture of disbelief: understanding asylum screening from within

                            Vicki Squire (Open University) Desert(ed) 'trash': Migration, agency and politics across the Sonoran borderzone

     

    Chair: Stephan Scheel (Open University)

     

    14:45-15.15     Coffee Break

     

    15:15- 17:00    Governing insecurity through resilience

     

    James Brassett and Nick Vaughan-Williams (Warwick University) Performative Ecologies of Resilience and Trauma


    Claudia Aradau (Open University) and Rens van Munster (Danish Institute of International Studies) Contested Genealogies of Resilience

     

    Chair: Raia Prokhovnik (Open University)

     

    17.00-18.30     Keynote Lecture


    Mitchell Dean (University of Newcastle, Australia) Resisting the Irresistible Event

     

    Chair: Claudia Aradau (Open University)

     

     

    RSVP: Attendance is free. To book a place, please email socsci-ccig-events@...

    CCIG Website www.open.ac.uk/ccig/ If you have any queries please contact Sarah Batt, Research Secretary, The Open University, Faculty of Social Sciences +44(0)1908 654704

     

     



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    --
    Annick T.R. Wibben, Ph.D.

    Chair, International Studies
    Associate Professor, Politics
    University of San Francisco
    2130 Fulton Street
    San Francisco, CA 94117-1080
    U.S.A.

    Phone 415.422.5058
    Fax 415.422.2101
    Email awibben@...

    Author of Feminist Security Studies: A narrative approach (Routledge, 2010):
     http://www.routledge.com/978-0-415-45728-6
    Now also available on Kindle:
    http://www.amazon.com/Feminist-Security-Studies-Narrative-ebook/dp/B004QM9OPA


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