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Russ writes a letter to the NY Times editor

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  • Mark
    http://tinyurl.com/kzsqr September 24, 2006 The President and the Law (1 Letter) To the Editor: John Yoo, a former deputy assistant attorney general in the
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 24, 2006
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      http://tinyurl.com/kzsqr

      September 24, 2006
      The President and the Law (1 Letter)

      To the Editor:

      John Yoo, a former deputy assistant attorney general in the Bush
      administration, acknowledges that President Bush’s unique approach to
      the law, which the president has insisted is necessary to fight
      terrorism, is motivated by the “broader’’ goal of strengthening
      executive power (Op-Ed, Sept. 17).

      Mr. Yoo cites this goal as a reason the administration has fought a
      “pre-emptive’’ war, “data-mined communications in the United States
      to root out terrorism,’’ detained terrorists without “formal’’
      charges and conducted “harsh’’ interrogations.

      The agenda includes the reclassification of government information
      and the withholding of information from Congress and the courts, and
      has been buttressed by the president’s “signing statements,’’ which
      Mr. Yoo asserts claim the president’s right not to enforce
      “unconstitutional’’ laws.

      In our system of government, it is the courts that determine the
      constitutionality of laws, not the president.

      But Mr. Yoo takes his argument further, asserting that the president
      can ignore laws like the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act
      because they have produced “dysfunction.’’ Indeed, according to Mr.
      Yoo, the president can ignore both laws and judicial decisions that
      he deems “wrongheaded’’ or “obsolete.’’

      These views are clearly offensive to our constitutional system. It is
      long past time for Congress to reassert its proper role in checking
      an executive branch that has so little respect for the principles
      that have sustained our democracy for more than 200 years.

      Russ Feingold
      U.S. Senator from Wisconsin
      Washington, Sept. 19, 2006
    • DeeAnna Roberts
      Mark, Thank s. I read this on the PPF Website.I agree with Sen. Feingold.This is BEYOND offensive to our constitutional system,It s impeachable.It would be
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 24, 2006
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        Mark,
         
        Thank's. I read this on the PPF Website.I agree with Sen. Feingold.This is BEYOND offensive to our constitutional system,It's impeachable.It would be nice to revisit that Censure Resolution.It's the least Congress could do.
        Mark <mark@...> wrote:
        http://tinyurl.com/kzsqr

        September 24, 2006
        The President and the Law (1 Letter)

        To the Editor:

        John Yoo, a former deputy assistant attorney general in the Bush
        administration, acknowledges that President Bush’s unique approach to
        the law, which the president has insisted is necessary to fight
        terrorism, is motivated by the “broader’’ goal of strengthening
        executive power (Op-Ed, Sept. 17).

        Mr. Yoo cites this goal as a reason the administration has fought a
        “pre-emptive’’ war, “data-mined communications in the United States
        to root out terrorism,’’ detained terrorists without “formal’’
        charges and conducted “harsh’’ interrogations.

        The agenda includes the reclassification of government information
        and the withholding of information from Congress and the courts, and
        has been buttressed by the president’s “signing statements,’’ which
        Mr. Yoo asserts claim the president’s right not to enforce
        “unconstitutional’’ laws.

        In our system of government, it is the courts that determine the
        constitutionality of laws, not the president.

        But Mr. Yoo takes his argument further, asserting that the president
        can ignore laws like the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act
        because they have produced “dysfunction.’’ Indeed, according to Mr.
        Yoo, the president can ignore both laws and judicial decisions that
        he deems “wrongheaded’’ or “obsolete.’’

        These views are clearly offensive to our constitutional system. It is
        long past time for Congress to reassert its proper role in checking
        an executive branch that has so little respect for the principles
        that have sustained our democracy for more than 200 years.

        Russ Feingold
        U.S. Senator from Wisconsin
        Washington, Sept. 19, 2006


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      • trukslp
        ** Thank goodness for if even just a few patriots like Feingold in Congress ** http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060926/ap_on_go_co/congress_surveillance Congress
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 26, 2006
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          ** Thank goodness for if even just a few patriots like Feingold in
          Congress **

          http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20060926/ap_on_go_co/congress_surveillance


          Congress unlikely to pass wiretapping
          By LAURIE KELLMAN, Associated Press Writer


          Congress is unlikely to approve a bill giving President Bush's
          warrantless wiretapping program legal status and new restrictions
          before the November midterm elections, dealing a significant blow to
          one of the White House's top wartime priorities.

          House and Senate versions of the legislation differ too much to
          bridge the gap by week's end, when Congress recesses until after the
          Nov. 7 elections, according to two GOP leadership aides who demanded
          anonymity because the decision had not yet been announced.

          ...
          --- In Feingold08@yahoogroups.com, Mark <mark@...> wrote:
          >
          > http://tinyurl.com/kzsqr
          >
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