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Re: [FateRPG] Re: Carry over effects

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  • Renato Ramonda
    ... Actually, you are right: I was stating the obvious if rules get in the way, screw the rules principle, but it does not really apply here... and it is
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 7, 2006
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      On 3/7/06, Mike Holmes <mike_c_holmes@...> wrote:
      >

      > I disagree. That is, I don't think that anything we're talking about here is
      > in any way an exception to the rules. I've played lots of FATE and never
      > once had to "fudge" a little.

      Actually, you are right: I was stating the obvious "if rules get in
      the way, screw the rules" principle, but it does not really apply
      here... and it is bound to appen very rarely in FATE, if only for the
      fact that rules are few, flexible, and well thought. Games with 300
      pages full of rules are bound to need this "0 rule" more often :-)

      > In part this is because the rules are flexible
      > to start with, yes. But that's a feature, and using the built-in flexibility
      > is not ignoring the rules in any way.

      I agree: I expressed the concept a bit roughly (sorry, english is not
      my first language :-) )

      > >So the hurt box will naturally uncheck :-)
      >
      > Right. This is what I was trying to say before to the original poster. Let's
      > say that there's a penalty that a character gets that is listed as being the
      > sort hat lasts the scene. But then healing magic is applied mid-scene. Would
      > you still require that the penalty last til the end of the scene?

      It looks like the OP is only taking a rule "the damage carries over"
      too literally and out of context: the context (damage and healing in a
      very broad sense) explains pretty clearly why the damage can
      "disappear", I think.

      --
      Renato Ramonda
    • dicework
      My answer here will be deeply influenced by lots of other threads in this group, glimpses about the future of FATE, and what I made up from all of this great
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 9, 2006
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        My answer here will be deeply influenced by lots of other threads in
        this group, glimpses about the future of FATE, and what I made up from
        all of this great stuff. So I'll depart from the usual damage track
        and may thus be of no help for you.

        First, when you check a box on your damage track, you ain't always
        physicaly hurt. It rather indicates that you're more or less
        disadvantaged, that you loose control over the situation. But, given
        your examples, you seem to already understand this.

        Second, I agree with Landon's relative interpretation of the damage
        track. My point of view is that as the same damage track can be
        used in very different types of conflict, a specific level of damage
        (hurt, injured...) may represent disadvantages whose magnitude can't
        be absolutly compared.

        For example, if Invincible Harry gets an Injured result during a
        fencing competition, this most probably means that he was touched by
        its opponent. But, if he gets the same result during a brawling melee,
        he may have his left arm broken. Those descriptions of the results
        depends of the situation/conflict.

        The same is true for their lasting effects. As it was the time ever
        an opponent sword reaches to his breast, he loose some self-
        confidence. This may doom his next fight but won't affect his driving
        skill. On the contrary, his left arm broken will impair him when
        fencing _and_ when driving.

        So, I prefer not to attribute absolute modifier to damage track
        levels. I prefer to use a combination of Edges/Twists and temporary
        Aspects. During the conflict, characters get Twists (that may last up
        to the end of the conflict when hurt or injured). At the end of the
        conflict, the damage track is cleared but being Injured or Taken
        Out results in temporary aspects.

        Twists and Aspects are by far more flexible than absolute modifiers.
        Being descriptive, their effects are easier to grasp and to apply.

        So what about your masked avenger losing his anonimity? He gets an
        aspect such as "Unmasked". This won't affect most of his skill. But
        it will probably influence his relationships. Maybe he has infiltrated
        a con network during daytime and his cover is now blown. Or he
        becomes an easy target for his Still-Masked Nemesis. Or...

        I hope that my blurp is of some help for you and that my english is
        not too bad to be understood.
      • dukereg11
        Your English is good, and your advice about using Twists and Aspects is good too. I hadn t looked at twists in any depth before, but they may be just what I
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 16, 2006
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          Your English is good, and your advice about using Twists and Aspects
          is good too. I hadn't looked at twists in any depth before, but they
          may be just what I was looking for...

          Thank you!

          --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, "dicework" <dicework@...> wrote:
          >
          > My answer here will be deeply influenced by lots of other threads in
          > this group, glimpses about the future of FATE, and what I made up from
          > all of this great stuff. So I'll depart from the usual damage track
          > and may thus be of no help for you.
          >
          > First, when you check a box on your damage track, you ain't always
          > physicaly hurt. It rather indicates that you're more or less
          > disadvantaged, that you loose control over the situation. But, given
          > your examples, you seem to already understand this.
          >
          > Second, I agree with Landon's relative interpretation of the damage
          > track. My point of view is that as the same damage track can be
          > used in very different types of conflict, a specific level of damage
          > (hurt, injured...) may represent disadvantages whose magnitude can't
          > be absolutly compared.
          >
          > For example, if Invincible Harry gets an Injured result during a
          > fencing competition, this most probably means that he was touched by
          > its opponent. But, if he gets the same result during a brawling melee,
          > he may have his left arm broken. Those descriptions of the results
          > depends of the situation/conflict.
          >
          > The same is true for their lasting effects. As it was the time ever
          > an opponent sword reaches to his breast, he loose some self-
          > confidence. This may doom his next fight but won't affect his driving
          > skill. On the contrary, his left arm broken will impair him when
          > fencing _and_ when driving.
          >
          > So, I prefer not to attribute absolute modifier to damage track
          > levels. I prefer to use a combination of Edges/Twists and temporary
          > Aspects. During the conflict, characters get Twists (that may last up
          > to the end of the conflict when hurt or injured). At the end of the
          > conflict, the damage track is cleared but being Injured or Taken
          > Out results in temporary aspects.
          >
          > Twists and Aspects are by far more flexible than absolute modifiers.
          > Being descriptive, their effects are easier to grasp and to apply.
          >
          > So what about your masked avenger losing his anonimity? He gets an
          > aspect such as "Unmasked". This won't affect most of his skill. But
          > it will probably influence his relationships. Maybe he has infiltrated
          > a con network during daytime and his cover is now blown. Or he
          > becomes an easy target for his Still-Masked Nemesis. Or...
          >
          > I hope that my blurp is of some help for you and that my english is
          > not too bad to be understood.
          >
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