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Re: [FateRPG] Re: The relation between aspects and skills.

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  • Brett Ritter
    ... Wait...Vorlons, Shadows, who asked What can you do? ? -- Brett Ritter / SwiftOne swiftone@swiftone.org
    Message 1 of 22 , Apr 4, 2013
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      On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 2:33 PM, Jonathan Lang <dataweaver@...> wrote:
      The _real_ division between Aspects and Skills is that Aspects are fundamentally about story elements (Who are you?  What do you want?), whereas Skills are are about capability (What can you do?).

      Wait...Vorlons, Shadows, who asked "What can you do?"?
      --
      Brett Ritter / SwiftOne
      swiftone@...
    • yzanshin
      ... Post jungians, presumably.
      Message 2 of 22 , Apr 4, 2013
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        --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, Brett Ritter <swiftone@...> wrote:
        > Wait...Vorlons, Shadows, who asked "What can you do?"?

        Post jungians, presumably.
      • dinkster8
        In my opinion compels and negative or bad aspects are what make Fate awesome. I ve always looked for a way to give my protagonists a downside, but
        Message 3 of 22 , Apr 4, 2013
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          In my opinion compels and "negative" or "bad" aspects are what make Fate awesome. I've always looked for a way to give my protagonists a downside, but previous attempts to do this have revolved around a merits and flaws system of trading flaws for more powerful characters. This doesn't work for me. I always wanted some real way of getting a character to add some interesting struggle or problem to their character. Take examples in popular fiction:

          Spiderman: Struggles with teen angst and social problems.
          Sherlock Holmes: Addicted to drugs/alcohol, and the social ramifications of his genius.
          Batman: Struggles with anger over his parents murder. Teetering on the edge of darkness.
          Ned Stark: In spite of his honor, he apparently cheated at some point.
          Rick Grimes: On the crazy train.

          These are the kinds of characters I want in my games. Interesting ones. This makes so much sense to me, and seems so fun, yet often when we get to the "Trouble Aspect" part of character creation players are like: "You want my character to be screwed up?"

          Sheesh.
        • Fred Hicks
          I know what you mean. It takes a certain amount of mind-hacking to get folks to come around in some cases. For me, the whole thing grew out of my love in the
          Message 4 of 22 , Apr 4, 2013
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            I know what you mean. It takes a certain amount of mind-hacking to get folks to come around in some cases.

            For me, the whole thing grew out of my love in the Amber DRPG of landing heavy on the bad stuff side of things. I'm a big "self-screwer" of characters when it comes right down to it, because I get particularly excited about heroes that have to overcome all sorts of diversity and are typically in over their heads. I blame the strong influence of Farscape for that perspective, in part.

            Fred


            On Thu, Apr 4, 2013 at 9:54 AM, dinkster8 <dinkster8@...> wrote:
            In my opinion compels and "negative" or "bad" aspects are what make Fate awesome.  I've always looked for a way to give my protagonists a downside, but previous attempts to do this have revolved around a merits and flaws system of trading flaws for more powerful characters.  This doesn't work for me.  I always wanted some real way of getting a character to add some interesting struggle or problem to their character.  Take examples in popular fiction:

            Spiderman:  Struggles with teen angst and social problems.
            Sherlock Holmes:  Addicted to drugs/alcohol, and the social ramifications of his genius.
            Batman:  Struggles with anger over his parents murder.  Teetering on the edge of darkness.
            Ned Stark:  In spite of his honor, he apparently cheated at some point.
            Rick Grimes:  On the crazy train.

            These are the kinds of characters I want in my games.  Interesting ones.  This makes so much sense to me, and seems so fun, yet often when we get to the "Trouble Aspect" part of character creation players are like:  "You want my character to be screwed up?"

            Sheesh.



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          • Brett Bowen
            I think it was Garibaldi. At the least he was interested in the order of things: Do you fasten then zip, or zip then fasten? ;)
            Message 5 of 22 , Apr 4, 2013
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              I think it was Garibaldi.

              At the least he was interested in the order of things: "Do you fasten then zip, or zip then fasten?"  ;)


              On Thu, Apr 4, 2013 at 3:15 AM, Brett Ritter <swiftone@...> wrote:


              On Wed, Apr 3, 2013 at 2:33 PM, Jonathan Lang <dataweaver@...> wrote:
              The _real_ division between Aspects and Skills is that Aspects are fundamentally about story elements (Who are you?  What do you want?), whereas Skills are are about capability (What can you do?).

              Wait...Vorlons, Shadows, who asked "What can you do?"?
              --
              Brett Ritter / SwiftOne
              swiftone@...


            • Lisa Hartjes
              ... I don t think a Trouble aspect has to be that s overtly and obviously negative. One of my character s Trouble Aspect is I Will Regain What My Family
              Message 6 of 22 , Apr 4, 2013
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                > In my opinion compels and "negative" or "bad" aspects are what make Fate
                > awesome. I've always looked for a way to give my protagonists a downside,
                > but previous attempts to do this have revolved around a merits and flaws
                > system of trading flaws for more powerful characters. This doesn't work
                > for me. I always wanted some real way of getting a character to add some
                > interesting struggle or problem to their character. Take examples in
                > popular fiction:
                >
                > Spiderman: Struggles with teen angst and social problems.
                > Sherlock Holmes: Addicted to drugs/alcohol, and the social ramifications
                > of his genius.
                > Batman: Struggles with anger over his parents murder. Teetering on the
                > edge of darkness.
                > Ned Stark: In spite of his honor, he apparently cheated at some point.
                > Rick Grimes: On the crazy train.
                >
                > These are the kinds of characters I want in my games. Interesting ones.
                > This makes so much sense to me, and seems so fun, yet often when we get to
                > the "Trouble Aspect" part of character creation players are like: "You
                > want my character to be screwed up?"
                >
                > Sheesh.

                I don't think a Trouble aspect has to be that's overtly and obviously
                negative. One of my character's Trouble Aspect is "I Will Regain What My
                Family Lost". It provides opportunities for both invokes and compels -
                something that I try to do with every Aspect.


                --
                Lisa Hartjes
                evilgm@...
                "Which one of you dares question my evil ways?"
                Huxley, The Adventures of Elmo In Grouchland
              • dinkster8
                ... True. It doesn t have to be. Still a character (Monk anyone?) trying to overcome their obsessive compulsive disorder to regain what their family lost
                Message 7 of 22 , Apr 4, 2013
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                  > I don't think a Trouble aspect has to be that's overtly and obviously
                  > negative. One of my character's Trouble Aspect is "I Will Regain What My
                  > Family Lost". It provides opportunities for both invokes and compels -
                  > something that I try to do with every Aspect.
                  >
                  >
                  > --
                  > Lisa Hartjes
                  > evilgm@...
                  > "Which one of you dares question my evil ways?"
                  > Huxley, The Adventures of Elmo In Grouchland

                  True. It doesn't have to be. Still a character (Monk anyone?) trying to overcome their obsessive compulsive disorder to regain what their family lost seems more interesting to me. I don't force this on my players though. I pretty much go with whatever.
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