Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [FateRPG] More Fan Conversions/Settings

Expand Messages
  • U.N.Owen
    The big reason why FATE is so flexible is because it almost isn t a system. It s got just enough structure that it covers all that it needs to, but doesn t
    Message 1 of 24 , Jan 20, 2013
    • 0 Attachment
      The big reason why FATE is so flexible is because it almost isn't a system. It's got just enough structure that it covers all that it needs to, but doesn't require gobs of rulebooks on it. It works on a very "if it makes sense to you guys" kind of basis with Fate Points being the economy with which you buy your vote, in a fashion.

      None of this is any condemnation of FATE, I think that's actually why it's so brilliant. Almost everything goes to applying Aspects in some fashion instead of trying to figure out how it should logically work out and then somebody uses Fate Points to tag that Aspect for a bonus or for the narrative effect they were aiming for.

      This Aspect-based framework makes it almost instantly adaptable to anything you want and,  if you have an idea that needs more effort, it's easy to add new rules or switch rules around without doing any harm to the rest of the pieces of the framework.

      On Sun, Jan 20, 2013 at 12:18 PM, Travis Heldibridle <travis.heldibridle@...> wrote:
       

      On Sun, Jan 20, 2013 at 12:41 PM, Kurt Rauscher <krauscher@...> wrote:

      I know I'm late to this party (catching up on my email), but ever since I first read Fate 2.0 I've felt that it was perfectly suited to Harry Potter.  I mean, "The Boy Who Lived" is obviously an aspect!

       
      Agreed. I was thinking about this the other day. The right subsystems for magic, and this could actually be fun.
       
      The issue here is that I have a hard time finding properties that wouldn't run well with Fate. Fate is the first 'generic' RPG that feels like I could really run pretty much anything without writing a textbook on which books/rules apply, workarounds for stats on odd races or items. Etc..
       
      I read the magic toolkit. The Subtle Art and Void Callers put me on a path to a game inspired by Supernatural, Friday the 13th (the TV series), and/or Hellboy... with a dose of Lovecraft.
       
      I'm excited about that prospect.. and that isn't even the game I intended to create/run with this system.


    • jughrin
      I respectfully disagree with FATE not being a system (though the other tidbits are fine with me :)). I think FATE is a fairly solid system, but it has made a
      Message 2 of 24 , Jan 20, 2013
      • 0 Attachment
        I respectfully disagree with FATE not being a system (though the other tidbits are fine with me :)). I think FATE is a fairly solid system, but it has made a great distinction that most other systems don't. To wit, FATE attempts to create or address the /story/ rather than the simulate a world or characters within it. (Hence the use of aspects, as you note.) Since almost all these genres are story-based, well...its easy for FATE to cover them. The faithfulness of any "conversion" often depend on the players at the table, rather than the mechanics of FATE as an engine.

        Which is not to say that FATE can't drift away from story-centered. It can and does, I don't consider it a purely narrative game. However, as is often mentioned in response to people attempting to FATE-ify D&D, trying to use FATE to do finely detailed position-based tactical movement fights with FATE is swimming upstream. Trying to create the same kind of adventure stories at a more abstract level, though, easy.


        --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, "U.N.Owen" wrote:
        >
        > The big reason why FATE is so flexible is because it almost isn't a system.
        > It's got just enough structure that it covers all that it needs to, but
        > doesn't require gobs of rulebooks on it. It works on a very "if it makes
        > sense to you guys" kind of basis with Fate Points being the economy with
        > which you buy your vote, in a fashion.
        >
        > None of this is any condemnation of FATE, I think that's actually why it's
        > so brilliant. Almost everything goes to applying Aspects in some fashion
        > instead of trying to figure out how it should logically work out and then
        > somebody uses Fate Points to tag that Aspect for a bonus or for the
        > narrative effect they were aiming for.
        >
        > This Aspect-based framework makes it almost instantly adaptable to anything
        > you want and, if you have an idea that needs more effort, it's easy to add
        > new rules or switch rules around without doing any harm to the rest of the
        > pieces of the framework.
        >
        > On Sun, Jan 20, 2013 at 12:18 PM, Travis Heldibridle <
        > travis.heldibridle@...> wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
      • Brook Freeman
        Would anyone be interested in colaborating on an In Nomine = FATE conversion? I have some ideas of where to start. There are parts the are very obvious,
        Message 3 of 24 , Jan 20, 2013
        • 0 Attachment
          Would anyone be interested in colaborating on an In Nomine => FATE conversion?

          I have some ideas of where to start.  There are parts the are very obvious, others that are a bit trickier.


          On Sun, Jan 20, 2013 at 7:26 PM, jughrin <jughrin@...> wrote:
           


          I respectfully disagree with FATE not being a system (though the other tidbits are fine with me :)). I think FATE is a fairly solid system, but it has made a great distinction that most other systems don't. To wit, FATE attempts to create or address the /story/ rather than the simulate a world or characters within it. (Hence the use of aspects, as you note.) Since almost all these genres are story-based, well...its easy for FATE to cover them. The faithfulness of any "conversion" often depend on the players at the table, rather than the mechanics of FATE as an engine.

          Which is not to say that FATE can't drift away from story-centered. It can and does, I don't consider it a purely narrative game. However, as is often mentioned in response to people attempting to FATE-ify D&D, trying to use FATE to do finely detailed position-based tactical movement fights with FATE is swimming upstream. Trying to create the same kind of adventure stories at a more abstract level, though, easy.


          --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, "U.N.Owen" wrote:
          >
          > The big reason why FATE is so flexible is because it almost isn't a system.
          > It's got just enough structure that it covers all that it needs to, but
          > doesn't require gobs of rulebooks on it. It works on a very "if it makes
          > sense to you guys" kind of basis with Fate Points being the economy with
          > which you buy your vote, in a fashion.
          >
          > None of this is any condemnation of FATE, I think that's actually why it's
          > so brilliant. Almost everything goes to applying Aspects in some fashion
          > instead of trying to figure out how it should logically work out and then
          > somebody uses Fate Points to tag that Aspect for a bonus or for the
          > narrative effect they were aiming for.
          >
          > This Aspect-based framework makes it almost instantly adaptable to anything
          > you want and, if you have an idea that needs more effort, it's easy to add
          > new rules or switch rules around without doing any harm to the rest of the
          > pieces of the framework.
          >
          > On Sun, Jan 20, 2013 at 12:18 PM, Travis Heldibridle <
          > travis.heldibridle@...> wrote:
          >
          > > **
          > >




          --
          Brook Freeman
          Bad spellers of the world untie!
        • PK Levine
          ... I don t have a lot of free time to put toward such a thing, but I d definitely be willing to comment on your suggestions and such. I ve converted In Nomine
          Message 4 of 24 , Jan 20, 2013
          • 0 Attachment
            On Sunday, January 20, 2013 08:05:17 pm Brook Freeman wrote:
            > Would anyone be interested in colaborating on an In Nomine => FATE
            > conversion?
            >
            > I have some ideas of where to start. There are parts the are very obvious,
            > others that are a bit trickier.

            I don't have a lot of free time to put toward such a thing, but I'd definitely
            be willing to comment on your suggestions and such. I've converted In Nomine
            to a few other systems already -- always loved the setting, hated the system.

            PK
          • John Rudd
            ... I have In Nomine , but haven t ever played it. I d love to see the fruits of such a conversion. Another one I d love to see is Nephilim (from
            Message 5 of 24 , Jan 20, 2013
            • 0 Attachment

              On Sun, Jan 20, 2013 at 5:05 PM, Brook Freeman <brook.freeman@...> wrote:
               

              Would anyone be interested in colaborating on an In Nomine => FATE conversion?


              I have "In Nomine", but haven't ever played it.  I'd love to see the fruits of such a conversion.

              Another one I'd love to see is "Nephilim" (from Chaosium).

            • Antoni Ten
              Rob Wieland of Camelot Trigger fame is working on an in nomine conversion on his blog
              Message 6 of 24 , Jan 20, 2013
              • 0 Attachment

                Rob Wieland of Camelot Trigger fame is working on an in nomine conversion on his blog

                http://mazecontroller.blogspot.com.es/2013/01/fate-core-in-nomine-hackthe-basics.html

                Only one post so far but I have great hopes in how it will turn out.

              • Ashok Desai
                Why convert In Nomine? There s plenty of room for a unique demons and angels FATE game, and most of the names used in In Nomine at least are in the public
                Message 7 of 24 , Jan 21, 2013
                • 0 Attachment
                  Why convert In Nomine? There's plenty of room for a unique demons and angels FATE game, and most of the names used in In Nomine at least are in the public domain. Half of them are just plucked out of the 72 spirits of Solomon.

                  Ash

                  Sent from my iPad
                • Jeramy Ware
                  I was just reading No Exit and thinking,thoughts easy it would be to use Clarity to run The Matrix. Really all you d have to do is rename I Remember Now into
                  Message 8 of 24 , Jan 21, 2013
                  • 0 Attachment

                    I was just reading No Exit and thinking,thoughts easy it would be to use Clarity to run The Matrix. Really all you'd have to do is rename I Remember Now into something like I Know Kung Fu, and maybe create a There is No Spoon stunt to overcome physics for a scene and you're pretty much set.

                    Even Agent of the Complex maps over nicely.

                    Sent from Yahoo! Mail on Android



                    From: Kurt Rauscher <krauscher@...>;
                    To: <FateRPG@yahoogroups.com>;
                    Subject: Re: [FateRPG] More Fan Conversions/Settings
                    Sent: Sun, Jan 20, 2013 5:41:33 PM

                     

                    I know I'm late to this party (catching up on my email), but ever since I first read Fate 2.0 I've felt that it was perfectly suited to Harry Potter.  I mean, "The Boy Who Lived" is obviously an aspect!  And Harry's player arrived late and is jumping in with only part of his character sheet filled in.

                    --
                    Sent from my Transformer Prime.

                    On Jan 12, 2013 3:57 AM, "Brett Ritter" <swiftone@...> wrote:


                    So the Burn Notice discussion has prompted me to bring up other fan-conversions/adaptations I'd like to see (read: I might do, but I'm just as eager to see done, so someone make me happy :) ).

                    1) Sliders: Okay, so it doesn't have to be the show directly, but dimension hopping is loads of fun, and the concept of different versions of the same people can translate well for Fate (similar aspects).  So the cab driver, the hotel clerk, the hotel itself - these all have repeat aspects from world to world.

                    2) SG-1: Stargate doesn't cry out for Fate the way Burn Notice or Sliders does, but it wouldn't be a bad conversion.  In particular, I bet Fate can model the magic-tech (zat guns, etc) much better than other systems (SG-1 has repeatable tech, in contrast to Star Trek, but tons of pseudoscience, which is not a contrast)  Bonus points if every planet has "Looks like a Vancouver Forest" aspect. :)

                    3) While GURPS adopted the Infinite Worlds setting as their core for GURPS 4th ed, I've always had a major crush on the 3rd ed Time Travel setting that involves two alternate futures battling to set the past to a course that makes their timeline more likely.  I'm a major Time Travel nut.  Sadly, I'm not so entertained by actual history, so bouncing PCs in history tends to leave me with boring research.  Continuum was an RPG that involved near-time time travel, but it the time-combat was too messy/abstract for my tastes.  I've been trying to come up with a good Time Travel setting for YEARS.  I'm positive Fate Core brings me closer (I eagerly await the Timeworks setting, but I'm picky enough to know I'll likely not be 100% satisfied - I'm a SERIOUS time travel nut).  The base concept I've got is that you're bound to travel near-time to your current Now (no more than a week or so off), that you're mostly held to the Observer effect and other rigid timeline concepts, BUT you can push past the plastic time which leaves you conflicted (paradoxed).  In such a state, you quickly become less significant (ala negative consequences) and can eventually cease to exist (think Back to the Future 1).  I just need to iron out the details (easier said than done, since I've been working on this since before Fate existed).

                    4) Vampires.  I admit it, I'm a child of the 80s and the emo vampires of Interview with a Vampire and Lestat rock my world.  Heck, I wrote up Dracula for GURPS Monsters [Real Stoker, none of this 'burn in sunlight' stuff!]  Twilight, etc not so much, though I don't engage in sparkle-bashing.  Still, I'd love to see a vampire setting that touched on those concepts that wasn't just White Wolf warmed over (nothing wrong with white wolf - there's just room for something new).  That said, converting the Kindred: The Embraced TV show to Fate would be easy (Aspect: "Nobody crosses clan Brujah!")

                    5) Leverage.  So there's already an RPG that's quite good (and has some familiar names behind it...), but there's no reason not to play around.  I'm sure there's a clever "flashback" mechanic that can be done with Aspects, and the base concept of capable characters works just fine. 

                    6) Once Upon a Time.  I've been very pleasantly surprised at the...skill...of the references in the writing of this, and the idea that Magic always has a Price works great for an RPG.  I thought of a system where you can use magic to create Aspects and obstacles, but every shift is counted up and divided into two parts: initial cost, and unexpected cost.  Basically the GM gets to use the unexpected cost shifts against you as aspects/compels whenever it'd be interesting. 

                    7) Brimstone - a short lived series where the hero is brought back from hell by a deal with the devil - he'll capture some souls that escaped hell, and he'll earn his mortal life back.  Oh, and every soul that has spent time in hell has absorbed some powers - PCs included.  Lots of potential here for an RPG.

                    8) Highlander - modern, swordfights, death as serious but not game-ending, and you can have a flashback scene to an earlier life to grab a useful aspect.  What's not to love?

                    --
                    Brett Ritter / SwiftOne
                    swiftone@...


                  • Hollis McCray
                    ... There s a quote from Leonard Balsera that goes There is a significant amount of rationale behind Fate design decisions that starts with, I am the laziest
                    Message 9 of 24 , Jan 23, 2013
                    • 0 Attachment
                      On Sun, Jan 20, 2013 at 3:18 PM, U.N.Owen <winter.avarice@...> wrote:
                       

                      The big reason why FATE is so flexible is because it almost isn't a system. It's got just enough structure that it covers all that it needs to, but doesn't require gobs of rulebooks on it. It works on a very "if it makes sense to you guys" kind of basis with Fate Points being the economy with which you buy your vote, in a fashion.


                      There's a quote from Leonard Balsera that goes "There is a significant amount of rationale behind Fate design decisions that starts with, "I am the laziest GM on the planet and want to do as little work as I can reasonably get away with". " Just popped into my head now.

                      --
                      Hollis McCray
                      aka The Fifth Wanderer

                      ascensionschild@...

                      "GMing is like herding cats. Wet, angry cats who are pumped full of LSD and methamphetamines." - Stolen from some forum sig somewhere
                    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.