Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

A whiskey-fueled western

Expand Messages
  • freelancepope
    This all started while perusing Barbarians Of Lemuria and consuming whiskey, but it still seems to make some kind of sense. It is a bit on the Q&D side of
    Message 1 of 5 , Feb 1, 2012
      This all started while perusing Barbarians Of Lemuria and consuming whiskey, but it still seems to make some kind of sense. It is a bit on the Q&D side of things.

      I've wanted to do something resembling the simplicity and speed of Boot Hill (3rd ed) but with more space for mechanics that make who you are (rather than just what you can do) significant, since that's what makes the dudes in westerns badass. Sure, it's important that the guy can draw and shoot pretty fast, but who would care if he didn't have his particular values and convictions? So of course aspects make sense for a western. So when I started looking at BoL, something between that and Boot Hill clicked for me.

      Neither of them have skill lists as such, but have combat skills and careers (they're called work skills in BH, but it pretty much works out the same). I figured it wouldn't be too difficult to apply this to Fate. So here's where I ended up:

      Characters will have five aspects, making sure to have at least one each to reflect:

      * your Disposition (demeanor, value, or conviction)
      * a Distinction (your style, an asset, or a colorful simile that could be used to describe you)
      * something relating to your Tale and giving you a connection to the world (a subplot or a family member perhaps)
      * your Connection to at least one other PC.
      * and one Open Range aspect. Maybe more if you've cleverly doubled up aspect types for one of 'em.

      I've cut it down from the usual 10 aspects partly to streamline things, partly because what would often be handled by aspects is covered ham-handedly by careers, and partly because of the symmetry of going along with five combat skills and five careers.

      Divide five points among the combat skills - Speed, Shooting, Brawling, Dodge, and Resolve. For a Sword & Sorcery/Barbarian game, ya might want to drop Speed, and split Brawling into Melee Weapons and Unarmed (speed is pretty important in a western, and the two types of close combat are a bit less) and change Shooting to Missile or whatever.

      Select five careers (using the term pretty broadly, since I'm counting things like Kid or Town Drunk as careers alongside Wainwright and Bounty Hunter, even if they don't pay very well) and distribute five points among them. If you select a career and put no points into it, make a note of it anyway. Perhaps there will be a canonical list.

      Use a single stress track, modified based on Resolve, and allow one of each consequence type (possibly adding more consequence capacity based on Resolve, as well). I'm leaning toward starting with 2 Stress boxes, adding 1 at Resolve 1, 2, and 4, and allowing an additional mild consequence at Resolve 3 and 5.

      I'll probably end up referring to Fate Points as Grit, just, y'know, because.

      I'm still cobbling together a system to handle reputation and notoriety with a bit of crunch, but hopefully without cumbersome bookkeeping.

      Guns should be a bit more deadly than they are in most iterations of Fate - all it should take is one bullet to kill a guy. It won't happen every time, but I want the players to feel like when the guns come out, someone will likely die. This isn't to say I want to have disposable PCs, but I want there to be a bit of gravity to it. Of course the players will have ways of mitigating this sort of thing, but I don't want it to be taken too lightly.

      I've searched through the archives was a bit surprised to not find much already covering this - either the BoL method of handling skills, or many references to westerns at all. Has anyone already gone over any of this territory?
    • Ashok Desai
      I don t know of a FATE Western, but it seems like a reasonable proposition. One thing that did turn me off a little about your choice of aspects though is that
      Message 2 of 5 , Feb 1, 2012
        I don't know of a FATE Western, but it seems like a reasonable proposition.

        One thing that did turn me off a little about your choice of aspects though is that only one of them really relates to personality and morality. Could make for a slightly one dimensional character. I personally like to have at least two, usually "who you appear to be" and "who you are inside"

        Ash

        Sent from my iPad
      • freelancepope
        ... Yeah, you re right. In an effort to (arbitrarily) cut it down to 5, I ditched a foolishly long checklist of aspects I d like to see, mostly personality
        Message 3 of 5 , Feb 1, 2012
          --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, Ashok Desai <EldritchDesign@...> wrote:
          >
          > One thing that did turn me off a little about your choice of aspects though is that only one of them really relates to personality and morality. Could make for a slightly one dimensional character. I personally like to have at least two, usually "who you appear to be" and "who you are inside"
          >
          > Ash

          Yeah, you're right. In an effort to (arbitrarily) cut it down to 5, I ditched a foolishly long checklist of aspects I'd like to see, mostly personality related.

          This kinda brings up something that's been floating around the back of my head for a while... How to, erm, compel aspects. I mean, how to encourage players to take certain types of them. There's flat out requiring them (it's appropriate in a Victorian superhero game to require aspects reflecting your social class and origin), and there's "hey, it'd be suave if you took an aspect reflecting your familial connections." But is there somewhere in betweenish - less heavy handed than requiring, but more encouraging than simply asking?

          Say, having it effect your Refresh - rather than adding 1 to your refresh for each aspect, start with 5 Refresh and add 1 to it for each Recommended Aspect. Maybe with a maximum of some sort (you increase your Refresh by one for each family connection, but up to three - not to say you can't take more aspects of the sort, but you only adjust your Refresh up to 3).

          Not sure if this is more than the "nudge" I'm looking for, as the going exchange rate for a point of Refresh seems to be 5 skill levels, which is fairly mighty.

          Is there any other decent way to encourage without forcing the selection of genre appropriate aspects, aside from "pretty please"?


          Jesse Q
        • Jeff
          Great question, Jesse! As someone who s in the process of wooing long-time D&D players, it s a question I have as well. So far, my approach has been to run
          Message 4 of 5 , Feb 2, 2012
            Great question, Jesse! As someone who's in the process of wooing long-time D&D players, it's a question I have as well.

            So far, my approach has been to run one-shots with pre-made characters. My thinking is: 1) It keeps time spent dealing with rules upfront to a minimum, and 2) I control the aspects characters have.

            #2 is relevant to your question because it's an opportunity for me to "sell" the players on why Aspects like "Snakes, why did it have to be snakes?" are awesome. During the adventure, I play those up as much as possible in the hopes that when it comes time for the players to make their own characters they'll be inclined to choose them as well.

            The downside here is that players might not feel as connected to their characters and each other when they inherit a list of aspects instead of coming up with their own. 



            On Thu, Feb 2, 2012 at 2:12 AM, freelancepope <jesseq@...> wrote:
             



            --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, Ashok Desai <EldritchDesign@...> wrote:
            >
            > One thing that did turn me off a little about your choice of aspects though is that only one of them really relates to personality and morality. Could make for a slightly one dimensional character. I personally like to have at least two, usually "who you appear to be" and "who you are inside"
            >
            > Ash

            Yeah, you're right. In an effort to (arbitrarily) cut it down to 5, I ditched a foolishly long checklist of aspects I'd like to see, mostly personality related.

            This kinda brings up something that's been floating around the back of my head for a while... How to, erm, compel aspects. I mean, how to encourage players to take certain types of them. There's flat out requiring them (it's appropriate in a Victorian superhero game to require aspects reflecting your social class and origin), and there's "hey, it'd be suave if you took an aspect reflecting your familial connections." But is there somewhere in betweenish - less heavy handed than requiring, but more encouraging than simply asking?

            Say, having it effect your Refresh - rather than adding 1 to your refresh for each aspect, start with 5 Refresh and add 1 to it for each Recommended Aspect. Maybe with a maximum of some sort (you increase your Refresh by one for each family connection, but up to three - not to say you can't take more aspects of the sort, but you only adjust your Refresh up to 3).

            Not sure if this is more than the "nudge" I'm looking for, as the going exchange rate for a point of Refresh seems to be 5 skill levels, which is fairly mighty.

            Is there any other decent way to encourage without forcing the selection of genre appropriate aspects, aside from "pretty please"?

            Jesse Q


          • Lisa Hartjes
            In the game I m in right now, the GM required me to take two types of Aspects: a Core Concept Aspect and a Challenge Aspect. For the rest, I was encouraged
            Message 5 of 5 , Feb 2, 2012
              In the game I'm in right now, the GM required me to take two types of
              Aspects: a Core Concept Aspect and a Challenge Aspect. For the rest, I
              was encouraged to take things that defined the character's personality
              and situation in life.

              If you're interested in seeing my character sheet (or the game), you can
              take a peek at it here:

              https://sites.google.com/site/swmalfurionisle/the-par/player-1

              The game was originally D&D, so the core concept was easy to figure out.
              Davena was a Warlord, so "Warlord in the Making" was a no brainer.
              The Aspect "We're Not Out of This Yet!" was also an easy one, reflecting
              one of the warlord's abilities (morale boosting) - and it can even be
              used in both tagged and compelled.

              If you've got a list of Aspects you'd like your players to take for
              their characters, perhaps you could provide them a list of "examples".
              And if they want to be someone from the nobility, require them to take
              an appropriate Aspect, otherwise they'll gain no benefit from it - that
              is, they can't "pull rank" on someone with a lesser title, or use their
              title to talk their way into a gentleman's club (no, not a strip club,
              but the original gentleman's club, where men would go to hang out with
              their friends, have dinner, and so on. Check out the Wikipedia entry on
              gentlemen's clubs (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gentlemen's_club) for
              more info.

              When you go through the character creation stuff, when they're making up
              their character's backgrounds and you're doing the guest star stuff,
              encourage them to take Aspects based on that.

              Using Davena as an example again, she has the Aspect "Gràinne's Master"
              (the game is set in a Ancient Roman-like world, where slavery exists).
              The other PC's background has her being a slave, and she was gifted to
              my character's family. Davena's father decided to give the slave (the
              other PC) to Davena. I decided to take "Gràinne's Master" as an Aspect
              for a couple of reasons. First, it has a lot of role play potential -
              Davena will gain prestige in the eyes of some NPC's (because Gràinne is
              a very valuable slave), and it will cause trouble for Davena with those
              who oppose slavery. And then there's the Fate Point importance. If
              Gràinne is trying to do something at Davena's request, I can tag
              "Gràinne's Master" and give Gràinne a Fate Point if she needs one.





              Lisa
              http://www.lisahartjes.com



              On 2/2/2012 9:06 AM, Jeff wrote:
              >
              >
              > Great question, Jesse! As someone who's in the process of wooing
              > long-time D&D players, it's a question I have as well.
              >
              > So far, my approach has been to run one-shots with pre-made characters.
              > My thinking is: 1) It keeps time spent dealing with rules upfront to a
              > minimum, and 2) I control the aspects characters have.
              >
              > #2 is relevant to your question because it's an opportunity for me to
              > "sell" the players on why Aspects like "Snakes, why did it have to be
              > snakes?" are awesome. During the adventure, I play those up as much as
              > possible in the hopes that when it comes time for the players to make
              > their own characters they'll be inclined to choose them as well.
              >
              > The downside here is that players might not feel as connected to their
              > characters and each other when they inherit a list of aspects instead of
              > coming up with their own.

              --
              Lisa Hartjes
              www.hartfeltproductions.com
              www.lisahartjes.com
              wol.lisahartjes.com - World of Lisacraft World Building Podcast
              www.dominogirlscomic.com
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.