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Re: The Story as a Character

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  • Alden
    Thanks. My thinking was that my Fate games are usually a lot more fun when the PCs are in a social, physical, or mental conflict with an NPC, and tend to fall
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 1, 2011
      Thanks.

      My thinking was that my Fate games are usually a lot more fun when the PCs are in a social, physical, or mental conflict with an NPC, and tend to fall flat when they're making a check against a static difficulty.

      The conflict rules are just more interesting than the simple check rules, so I thought it would be a good idea to engage those rules whenever possible.

      I've run a few scenes in which the environment itself acts as a character, in addition to NPCs that they are fighting, and those scenes have worked well so far.

      --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, Jim Montgomery <frontendchaos@...> wrote:
      >
      > I re-read the plot stress rules in LoA this morning (due to this thread),
      > and they seem pretty much the same as SBA.
      >
      > My problem with the implementation is that it reads like the PCs doing good
      > (or maybe even arbitrary) stuff causes plot stress, which triggers negative
      > events to happen. Maybe this isn't accurate, but it's confusing how to use
      > it.
      >
      > Switching it around to be based on actors inflicting stress/consequences on
      > their objectives to get their way is very clear. It actually seems a bit
      > like Diaspora's social combat without the zones, which is where I think I'm
      > trying to get to.
      >
      > I'm actually looking at Bulldog's chase rules to model more abstract
      > scene-based conflict resolution... some quick experiments showed promise.
      >
      > Jim
      >
      > On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 10:49 AM, Alden <alden.strock@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > I haven't seen the plot stress rules in LoA. I did take a look at the plot
      > > stress in Starblazer Adventures, but it didn't quite have the structured
      > > narrative impact that I was looking for. Is the LoA version much different
      > > from the SA version?
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Anderson <bruce.germund@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > This sounds a lot like the Plot Stress rules in Legends of Anglerre.
      > > >
      > > > Bruce
      > > >
      > > > On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 5:46 PM, Jim Montgomery <frontendchaos@
      > > ...>wrote:
      > > >
      > > > > **
      > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > I've been thinking similar thoughts over the last few days, so this is
      > > > > quite cool =)
      > > > >
      > > > > Jim
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 4:11 PM, Alden <alden.strock@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > >> **
      > >
      > > > >>
      > > > >>
      > > > >> So I've had this idea about applying more of the character rules
      > > directly
      > > > >> to the narrative of a FATE adventure, creating "Narrative Characters".
      > > After
      > > > >> a bit of dithering and fiddling, I finally have what I think is a
      > > coherent
      > > > >> description of it. It's too long for this format, so I put it up on a
      > > Blog.
      > > > >>
      > > > >> Here's the TL;DR version. Make the story a character with aspects,
      > > skills,
      > > > >> stress, and consequences. Do the same with certain scenes. Whenever
      > > the PCs
      > > > >> try to accomplish something in the game, and they aren't rolling
      > > against
      > > > >> NPCs, have them roll against the story or the scene instead. As the
      > > make
      > > > >> progress, they do stress to the story/scene, and inflict consequences.
      > > These
      > > > >> consequences indicate how they PCs have advanced the plot. Mix and
      > > match
      > > > >> NPC, Scene, and Story as opponents to create more exciting conflicts.
      > > > >>
      > > > >>
      > > > >>
      > > http://explosivebraindebris.blogspot.com/2011/03/story-as-character-1-generic-fate.html
      > > > >>
      > > > >>
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --
      > > > Bruce Anderson
      > > >
      > > > Saskatoon Homeschool RPG Club <http://hsrpgclub.wordpress.com/>
      > > >
      > > > *"**Fantasy remains a human right: we make in our measure and in our
      > >
      > > > derivative mode, because we are made: and not only made, but made in the
      > > > image and likeness of a Maker." *
      > > > — J.R.R. Tolkien<
      > > http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/656983.J_R_R_Tolkien>
      > > > (On Fairy-Stories <http://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/1351902>)
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
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