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Re: [FateRPG] Re: The Story as a Character

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  • Jim Montgomery
    I re-read the plot stress rules in LoA this morning (due to this thread), and they seem pretty much the same as SBA. My problem with the implementation is that
    Message 1 of 6 , Sep 30, 2011
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      I re-read the plot stress rules in LoA this morning (due to this thread), and they seem pretty much the same as SBA.

      My problem with the implementation is that it reads like the PCs doing good (or maybe even arbitrary) stuff causes plot stress, which triggers negative events to happen. Maybe this isn't accurate, but it's confusing how to use it.

      Switching it around to be based on actors inflicting stress/consequences on their objectives to get their way is very clear. It actually seems a bit like Diaspora's social combat without the zones, which is where I think I'm trying to get to.

      I'm actually looking at Bulldog's chase rules to model more abstract scene-based conflict resolution... some quick experiments showed promise.

      Jim

      On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 10:49 AM, Alden <alden.strock@...> wrote:
       

      I haven't seen the plot stress rules in LoA. I did take a look at the plot stress in Starblazer Adventures, but it didn't quite have the structured narrative impact that I was looking for. Is the LoA version much different from the SA version?



      --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Anderson <bruce.germund@...> wrote:
      >
      > This sounds a lot like the Plot Stress rules in Legends of Anglerre.
      >
      > Bruce
      >
      > On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 5:46 PM, Jim Montgomery <frontendchaos@...>wrote:
      >
      > > **

      > >
      > >
      > > I've been thinking similar thoughts over the last few days, so this is
      > > quite cool =)
      > >
      > > Jim
      > >
      > >
      > > On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 4:11 PM, Alden <alden.strock@...> wrote:
      > >
      > >> **

      > >>
      > >>
      > >> So I've had this idea about applying more of the character rules directly
      > >> to the narrative of a FATE adventure, creating "Narrative Characters". After
      > >> a bit of dithering and fiddling, I finally have what I think is a coherent
      > >> description of it. It's too long for this format, so I put it up on a Blog.
      > >>
      > >> Here's the TL;DR version. Make the story a character with aspects, skills,
      > >> stress, and consequences. Do the same with certain scenes. Whenever the PCs
      > >> try to accomplish something in the game, and they aren't rolling against
      > >> NPCs, have them roll against the story or the scene instead. As the make
      > >> progress, they do stress to the story/scene, and inflict consequences. These
      > >> consequences indicate how they PCs have advanced the plot. Mix and match
      > >> NPC, Scene, and Story as opponents to create more exciting conflicts.
      > >>
      > >>
      > >> http://explosivebraindebris.blogspot.com/2011/03/story-as-character-1-generic-fate.html
      > >>
      > >>
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      > --
      > Bruce Anderson
      >
      > Saskatoon Homeschool RPG Club <http://hsrpgclub.wordpress.com/>
      >
      > *"**Fantasy remains a human right: we make in our measure and in our

      > derivative mode, because we are made: and not only made, but made in the
      > image and likeness of a Maker." *
      > — J.R.R. Tolkien<http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/656983.J_R_R_Tolkien>
      > (On Fairy-Stories <http://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/1351902>)
      >


    • Alden
      Thanks. My thinking was that my Fate games are usually a lot more fun when the PCs are in a social, physical, or mental conflict with an NPC, and tend to fall
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 1, 2011
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        Thanks.

        My thinking was that my Fate games are usually a lot more fun when the PCs are in a social, physical, or mental conflict with an NPC, and tend to fall flat when they're making a check against a static difficulty.

        The conflict rules are just more interesting than the simple check rules, so I thought it would be a good idea to engage those rules whenever possible.

        I've run a few scenes in which the environment itself acts as a character, in addition to NPCs that they are fighting, and those scenes have worked well so far.

        --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, Jim Montgomery <frontendchaos@...> wrote:
        >
        > I re-read the plot stress rules in LoA this morning (due to this thread),
        > and they seem pretty much the same as SBA.
        >
        > My problem with the implementation is that it reads like the PCs doing good
        > (or maybe even arbitrary) stuff causes plot stress, which triggers negative
        > events to happen. Maybe this isn't accurate, but it's confusing how to use
        > it.
        >
        > Switching it around to be based on actors inflicting stress/consequences on
        > their objectives to get their way is very clear. It actually seems a bit
        > like Diaspora's social combat without the zones, which is where I think I'm
        > trying to get to.
        >
        > I'm actually looking at Bulldog's chase rules to model more abstract
        > scene-based conflict resolution... some quick experiments showed promise.
        >
        > Jim
        >
        > On Fri, Sep 30, 2011 at 10:49 AM, Alden <alden.strock@...> wrote:
        >
        > > **
        > >
        > >
        > > I haven't seen the plot stress rules in LoA. I did take a look at the plot
        > > stress in Starblazer Adventures, but it didn't quite have the structured
        > > narrative impact that I was looking for. Is the LoA version much different
        > > from the SA version?
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, Bruce Anderson <bruce.germund@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > This sounds a lot like the Plot Stress rules in Legends of Anglerre.
        > > >
        > > > Bruce
        > > >
        > > > On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 5:46 PM, Jim Montgomery <frontendchaos@
        > > ...>wrote:
        > > >
        > > > > **
        > >
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > I've been thinking similar thoughts over the last few days, so this is
        > > > > quite cool =)
        > > > >
        > > > > Jim
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > On Thu, Sep 29, 2011 at 4:11 PM, Alden <alden.strock@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > >> **
        > >
        > > > >>
        > > > >>
        > > > >> So I've had this idea about applying more of the character rules
        > > directly
        > > > >> to the narrative of a FATE adventure, creating "Narrative Characters".
        > > After
        > > > >> a bit of dithering and fiddling, I finally have what I think is a
        > > coherent
        > > > >> description of it. It's too long for this format, so I put it up on a
        > > Blog.
        > > > >>
        > > > >> Here's the TL;DR version. Make the story a character with aspects,
        > > skills,
        > > > >> stress, and consequences. Do the same with certain scenes. Whenever
        > > the PCs
        > > > >> try to accomplish something in the game, and they aren't rolling
        > > against
        > > > >> NPCs, have them roll against the story or the scene instead. As the
        > > make
        > > > >> progress, they do stress to the story/scene, and inflict consequences.
        > > These
        > > > >> consequences indicate how they PCs have advanced the plot. Mix and
        > > match
        > > > >> NPC, Scene, and Story as opponents to create more exciting conflicts.
        > > > >>
        > > > >>
        > > > >>
        > > http://explosivebraindebris.blogspot.com/2011/03/story-as-character-1-generic-fate.html
        > > > >>
        > > > >>
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > --
        > > > Bruce Anderson
        > > >
        > > > Saskatoon Homeschool RPG Club <http://hsrpgclub.wordpress.com/>
        > > >
        > > > *"**Fantasy remains a human right: we make in our measure and in our
        > >
        > > > derivative mode, because we are made: and not only made, but made in the
        > > > image and likeness of a Maker." *
        > > > — J.R.R. Tolkien<
        > > http://www.goodreads.com/author/quotes/656983.J_R_R_Tolkien>
        > > > (On Fairy-Stories <http://www.goodreads.com/work/quotes/1351902>)
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
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