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Re: A Look into Fate: Skills

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  • Seth Halbeisen
    I have been following this and many other discussions on this group, and I do like them, but one point still bothers me. Why need stress tracks at all? The
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 4, 2011
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      I have been following this and many other discussions on this group, and I do like them, but one point still bothers me.

      Why need stress tracks at all?

      The core and most creative aspect of fate is ASPECTS!

      In most of my games, wether one offs for conventions or long term games, I often wonder why bother with stress tracks...

      It is just as easy to assign consciences straight away, just speed out kore of them. Separate sets of consequences slots for physical bd mental/social?

      Start players with 2 molds, a moderate, and a severe. Have the endurance skill and resolve, or whatever you want to call them, add to the number of consequences the character can take before being taken out.

      I personally feel that you can neve have enough aspects. And that exactly what consequences are!

      What does everyone else think?
      Do players need "hit points" ?
      Are they really necessary to a rpg?

      Sent from my iPhone
    • Travis Casey
      ... This is similar to the way that Universalis handles damage -- damage to a character can either be used to take away traits (e.g., a character who has a
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 4, 2011
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        On Mar 4, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Seth Halbeisen wrote:

         

        Why need stress tracks at all?

        The core and most creative aspect of fate is ASPECTS!

        In most of my games, wether one offs for conventions or long term games, I often wonder why bother with stress tracks...

        It is just as easy to assign consciences straight away, just speed out kore of them. Separate sets of consequences slots for physical bd mental/social?

        Start players with 2 molds, a moderate, and a severe. Have the endurance skill and resolve, or whatever you want to call them, add to the number of consequences the character can take before being taken out.

        I personally feel that you can neve have enough aspects. And that exactly what consequences are!

        What does everyone else think?
        Do players need "hit points" ?
        Are they really necessary to a rpg?


        This is similar to the way that Universalis handles damage -- damage to a character can either be used to take away traits (e.g., a character who has a "fast runner" trait might get shot in the leg and lose the trait) or to give them new traits (e.g., "broken arm").

        Characters have a "story importance", which is equal to the number of traits they have.  To remove a character from the game, you have to reduce their story importance to zero.  Note that this means that giving someone a new trait with damage actually makes it *harder* to remove them from the story!

        Another example of a system without hit points would be Mutants and Masterminds, and its derivative True 20 -- in them, when a character takes damage, they have to make a resistance check against the damage.  If they succeed in the check, nothing happens.  If they fail, varying effects can happen, from a penalty to future damage checks, through being stunned or incapacitated, to being killed.

        --
        Travis Casey
        Reality is vastly overrated.



      • Jim Montgomery
        I m looking at Awesome Adventures now (how many friggin flavors of this game am I gonna buy??), and it doesn t do stress tracks. If an attacker gains shifts on
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 5, 2011
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          I'm looking at Awesome Adventures now (how many friggin flavors of this game am I gonna buy??), and it doesn't do stress tracks. If an attacker gains shifts on an attack the target takes a consequence, starting with minor. If they already have a minor consequence it rolls up to Moderate (then Severe then Critical). For every 3 shifts the attacker gets, the inflicted consequence gets upgraded one level. Both intuitive and streamlined, I think I might give it a try.

          On Fri, Mar 4, 2011 at 11:18 PM, Travis Casey <efindel@...> wrote:
           

          On Mar 4, 2011, at 7:30 PM, Seth Halbeisen wrote:

           

          Why need stress tracks at all?

          The core and most creative aspect of fate is ASPECTS!

          In most of my games, wether one offs for conventions or long term games, I often wonder why bother with stress tracks...

          It is just as easy to assign consciences straight away, just speed out kore of them. Separate sets of consequences slots for physical bd mental/social?

          Start players with 2 molds, a moderate, and a severe. Have the endurance skill and resolve, or whatever you want to call them, add to the number of consequences the character can take before being taken out.

          I personally feel that you can neve have enough aspects. And that exactly what consequences are!

          What does everyone else think?
          Do players need "hit points" ?
          Are they really necessary to a rpg?


          This is similar to the way that Universalis handles damage -- damage to a character can either be used to take away traits (e.g., a character who has a "fast runner" trait might get shot in the leg and lose the trait) or to give them new traits (e.g., "broken arm").

          Characters have a "story importance", which is equal to the number of traits they have.  To remove a character from the game, you have to reduce their story importance to zero.  Note that this means that giving someone a new trait with damage actually makes it *harder* to remove them from the story!

          Another example of a system without hit points would be Mutants and Masterminds, and its derivative True 20 -- in them, when a character takes damage, they have to make a resistance check against the damage.  If they succeed in the check, nothing happens.  If they fail, varying effects can happen, from a penalty to future damage checks, through being stunned or incapacitated, to being killed.

          --
          Travis Casey
          Reality is vastly overrated.




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