Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Brass Compass Necromancy

Expand Messages
  • Rob
    ... That s 100% workable right there, though you could even introduce it as 2 additional elements (Void and Spirit) representing the opposite sides of the coin
    Message 1 of 9 , Dec 30, 2003
    • 0 Attachment
      --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Stehwien" <rstehwien@c...> wrote:
      > Currently the Brass Compas has 4 elements - earth, wind, fire, and water
      > which pretty much cover the physical realm. Add a fifth element called
      > Void or Spirit that controls spirits, souls, and the mind. This new element
      > could be used for nefarious purposes by necromancers or for good by
      > shamans or diciples of the mind.
      >
      > --Robert

      That's 100% workable right there, though you could even introduce it as 2 additional
      elements (Void and Spirit) representing the opposite sides of the coin of death, one
      for spirit and one for matter. Of course, that' sjust my desire for symmetry speaking:
      there's more than enough real world precendent for 5-element systems that there's
      no real need to go with even numbers.

      If you want to go even further, you could assign a "Spiritual" resonance to each of the
      existing elements, and just expand their scope to suit. At the end of the day, the
      system is elemental because that's one of the easiest thematic groupings to explain,
      but there's no reason not to go a little nuts. :)

      Ok, now onto the matter of combat.

      Let's say we're looking at Throm the Mighty (Assume he's Good at most combat stuff)
      who is trying to seperate Alcan the Scourge (a fire Mage [] [] with Great Mastery and
      Good everythign else) from his head. They start some distance apart, but let's assume
      Alcan's got a Ritual Bonfire going, so he's already got a source of fire on hand, so he
      doesn't need to worry about creating flame. Alcan's got 2 levels of Fire mage, so he
      can manipulate fist-sized balls of flame, which is enough to throw faireballs at Throm,
      so he's pretty much good to go.

      Now, what follows from here depends upon how fine a grain you are applying to
      combat.

      In fast and loose combat, we're looking at skill vs. skill modified by any advantages.
      Fire's a pretty scary and painful weapon, so Alcan might receive a +1 advantage for
      superior weapon, but it's pretty hard for him to parry with it, and it's not necessarily
      as fast as a sword, so that seems pretty much a wash. Bottom line is that it will be
      skill vs. skill, but Alcan gets a free shot off before Throm closes the distance. (If he
      had chosen to create a sword out of flame, that migth earn him a superior weapon
      advantage, but he'd then have to depend on his not-so-good sword skill). TO play it
      out:

      Because of Throm having to close the distance, Alcan has a +1 situational advatage in
      the first exchange. He reaches into the fire to pull out a flaming sphere (Rolling His
      Great Mastery skill, he gets a -1: Good, enough to succeed) and hurls it at Throm
      (Rolls his Mastery again, this time +1: Superb, +1 for his advantage for Epic. Throm's
      defense is only a Good, and Throm is Hurt) who is badly scorched, but manages to
      close the distance.

      THe situational advantage is expended, and Throm swings at Alcan. Alcan slaps the
      fire, tryign to splash it towards Throm and keep him at bay. He merely ripples the
      surface, and is forced to dive out of the way of Throm's swing (He rolls -2 (Fair) on his
      mastery roll,so he fails to do as he'd hoped. This is bad, since it means that for the
      exchange, he has no weapon, granting Throm a +1 advantage for superior arms, and
      he has to defend himself with his dodge (which is only Fair) rather than his Great
      Mastery. Luck is on his side, however, and a tie means he's only scratched.

      Circling around the bonfire, the fight continues....

      In more detailed combat, we'd probably assign Alcan's fire bolts a base damage equal
      to their scope (2). If we're seperating out Attack and defense, I'd probably grant an
      additional damage bonus to Alcan (say, +2, since fire is pretty nasty) but he'd need to
      depend on a different skill for his defense.

      I should note that all of this demonstrates a very gernerous interpretation of the
      workings of magic, more in keeping with the tenets of Sword and Sorcery than
      traditional fantasy. In more traditional fantasy, it might well be the action of a full
      round to perform a Mastery roll.

      Anyway, I hope that helps.

      -Rob D.
    • Rob
      And illustrating why I should remember to look things up, I was using mastery throughout that example when I should have been using Evocation.
      Message 2 of 9 , Dec 30, 2003
      • 0 Attachment
        And illustrating why I should remember to look things up, I was using mastery
        throughout that example when I should have been using Evocation.
      • Iago
        ... Depends on your read of the skill functions, in part, though. He had a source of fire on hand; arguably, Mastery would be all he d need to control that,
        Message 3 of 9 , Dec 30, 2003
        • 0 Attachment
          On Tue, 30 Dec 2003, Rob wrote:

          > And illustrating why I should remember to look things up,
          > I was using mastery throughout that example when I should
          > have been using Evocation.

          Depends on your read of the skill functions, in part,
          though. He had a source of fire on hand; arguably, Mastery
          would be all he'd need to control that, and as such, in
          that specific circumstance, Mastery may overlap a lot of
          Evocation's gig. Evocation might be able to draw up a bolt
          of fire without an on-hand source of fire, on the other
          hand -- but without Mastery, there's always a chance that
          that fire could then get out of hand. I actually like this
          distinction between Evoker-spikers and Mastery-spikers.
          The latter have more finesse, but are more lacking in the
          innate ability to call forth the element.

          There's in fact a *lot* of overlap among the skills
          (I'll leave out dispelling for now), and I think some of
          the distinctions come down to flavor and interpretation.
          In this case, I'd say:

          Summoning - Supreme in bringing fire into being, but not
          so hot with the controlling and aiming part. If you need
          to set an entire town on fire, this is your best bet.

          Evocation - Supreme in creating short bursts of fire,
          but crap for sustaining or controlling it beyond that
          initial moment.

          Mastery - Supreme in taking already existing fire and
          guiding it and setting boundaries on its effects, but
          unable to actually bring it into being.

          --
          Fred Hicks <iago AT iago DOT net>
          "Curse you iago and your fast fingers!" - Rob Donoghue
          Fate RPG - http://www.evilhat.com/fate/
          Check out my famous friend - http://www.jim-butcher.com/
        • James Pacek
          Great summary. Printing it for my notes as we speak. ... Thanks, _______________________ Jim Pacek wilmanric@cableaz.com
          Message 4 of 9 , Dec 30, 2003
          • 0 Attachment
            Great summary. Printing it for my notes as we speak.

            On Dec 30, 2003, at 8:23 AM, Iago wrote:

            > Summoning - Supreme in bringing fire into being, but not
            > so hot with the controlling and aiming part. If you need
            > to set an entire town on fire, this is your best bet.
            >
            > Evocation - Supreme in creating short bursts of fire,
            > but crap for sustaining or controlling it beyond that
            > initial moment.
            >
            > Mastery - Supreme in taking already existing fire and
            > guiding it and setting boundaries on its effects, but
            > unable to actually bring it into being.

            Thanks,

            _______________________
            Jim Pacek
            wilmanric@...
          • Jim D
            On 12/30/2003, in James Pacek was seen fudging this: JP Well, the Brass Compass (the system I use in my
            Message 5 of 9 , Dec 30, 2003
            • 0 Attachment
              On 12/30/2003, in
              <mid:2BCFE046-3AD4-11D8-962A-000393B1A416@...> James Pacek was
              seen fudging this:

              JP> Well, the Brass Compass (the system I use in my Mindreth campaign)
              JP> is designed around the idea of elements. You might want to think
              JP> of Death/Decay as an element/Aspect in this case.

              Bravo! I knew you would come through for me, JP, but I posted it to
              the list so your answer could help more than just me.

              --
              Best regards,
              Jim D JD -at- CastleGK -dot- com
              [Using The Bat! 2.01.3 on Windows XP Service Pack 1 Build 2600]
              ---
              Why am I frowning? It takes 42 muscles to frown and only 17 to smile
              and I need the exercise!
              ---
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.