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Inside-out experience

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  • Damien Sullivan
    New to me idea I just had, for advancement. Traditional style would be to start with a low skill pyramid, and climb up, which fails to model the 25 year old
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 1, 2007
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      New to me idea I just had, for advancement. Traditional style would be
      to start with a low skill pyramid, and climb up, which fails to model
      the 25 year old prodigy who's really specialized in something.

      So, invert: in a "low-power" game, you might have 5 skill levels, but
      you can go ahead and be Superb in something if you want. As you age, or
      at least experience, you become more well-rounded, filling out the other
      skills (and maybe swapping, if you choose to focus in something else...
      we'll ignore the difficulty of making up for ten years of focusing on
      one thing.) So you can have your starting awesome, instead of being a
      schlub, while still having lots of room for gaining things in lots of
      small steps (since lots of players like lots of little experience
      gains), vs. rare new stunts.

      Make sense? Seem appealing?

      -xx- Damien X-)
    • Ryan Macklin
      I think you got something there. You could also mix that up a bit to model the 25-year old prodigy who s really specialized in something, but has room for
      Message 2 of 3 , Dec 1, 2007
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        I think you got something there. You could also mix that up a bit to
        model the 25-year old prodigy who's really specialized in something,
        but has room for improvement, by setting that skill at Great rather
        than Superb. During advancement, that could potentially be moved to
        the Superb slot, but also advancement could lead to a character who,
        while skilled at something, finds a new passion and a completely
        different skill finds its way at the top spot instead.

        But yeah, my little derailment aside, that's a neat idea. The only
        concern I might have is how that would feel in play, if that really
        feels like a satisfying growth. But, well, the proof's in the play,
        not the talk. :)

        - Ryan

        On Dec 1, 2007 1:15 AM, Damien Sullivan <phoenix@...> wrote:
        > New to me idea I just had, for advancement. Traditional style would be
        > to start with a low skill pyramid, and climb up, which fails to model
        > the 25 year old prodigy who's really specialized in something.
        >
        > So, invert: in a "low-power" game, you might have 5 skill levels, but
        > you can go ahead and be Superb in something if you want. As you age, or
        > at least experience, you become more well-rounded, filling out the other
        > skills (and maybe swapping, if you choose to focus in something else...
        > we'll ignore the difficulty of making up for ten years of focusing on
        > one thing.) So you can have your starting awesome, instead of being a
        > schlub, while still having lots of room for gaining things in lots of
        > small steps (since lots of players like lots of little experience
        > gains), vs. rare new stunts.
        >
        > Make sense? Seem appealing?
        >
        > -xx- Damien X-)
        >
        >
        > | Fate * http://www.faterpg.com/
        > | SOTC * http://www.evilhat.com/?spirit
        > | DFRPG * http://www.dresdenfilesrpg.com/
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        >
        >
        >



        --
        Ryan Macklin
        Master Plan: The People's Podcast About Game Design
        http://masterplanpodcast.net/
      • Kurt Rauscher
        ... Couldn t the prodigy just have a lot of aspects related to their specialty? That seems like the simplest way of handling it to me. There was also
        Message 3 of 3 , Dec 3, 2007
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          On Dec 1, 2007 4:15 AM, Damien Sullivan <phoenix@...> wrote:
          > New to me idea I just had, for advancement. Traditional style would be
          > to start with a low skill pyramid, and climb up, which fails to model
          > the 25 year old prodigy who's really specialized in something.

          Couldn't the prodigy just have a lot of aspects related to their
          specialty? That seems like the simplest way of handling it to me.

          There was also something back in FATE 2e about "potential" during the
          phase / time based character creation, which was really just giving
          phases and skill points to younger characters so they have the same
          total resources as older characters. Although, if everyone's starting
          out at the same age or number of phases, the skill pyramid would still
          limit that peak skill.

          >
          > So, invert: in a "low-power" game, you might have 5 skill levels, but
          > you can go ahead and be Superb in something if you want. As you age, or
          > at least experience, you become more well-rounded, filling out the other
          > skills (and maybe swapping, if you choose to focus in something else...
          > we'll ignore the difficulty of making up for ten years of focusing on
          > one thing.) So you can have your starting awesome, instead of being a
          > schlub, while still having lots of room for gaining things in lots of
          > small steps (since lots of players like lots of little experience
          > gains), vs. rare new stunts.
          >

          Good idea! Using a mostly empty skill pyramid and filling it in /
          moving things around as part of character advancement seems like a
          good solution if you want people to be able to be "better" earlier.
          If that's what you want to model you could just consider ditching the
          pyramid concept entirely for advancement. Although, I suppose it
          might still be useful if you didn't want people to be able to have 2
          or 3 skills at the ultimate peak.

          --
          Kurt Rauscher -:- krauscher@...
          "This and no other is the root from which a tyrant springs; when he
          first appears, he is a protector." -Plato
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