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Re: What sort of choices would you want horror combat to be about?

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  • etmikem
    I agree with the idea of longer lasting consequences. Horror RPGs have always been much more about facing a fewer number of more terrifying foes, rather than
    Message 1 of 33 , Sep 30, 2007
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      I agree with the idea of longer lasting consequences. Horror RPGs have
      always been much more about facing a fewer number of more terrifying
      foes, rather than room after room of minor foes. Mind numbing terror
      of facing these foes should leave lasting effects long after they are
      defeated.

      The physical wounds heal quickly (leaving the FATE 3.0/SOTC rules in
      place works for me) but the mental damage is deeper and player should
      feel emotionally damaged. Once an adventure is over I would convert
      any moderate or severe composure consequences into a semi-permanent
      aspect. Phobias are the first thing that comes to mind (fear of the
      dark, water, closed spaces, fire, loud noises), all resulting in an
      aspect the game master can tap. Perhaps the plot can allow for
      circumstances where they can be removed - such as the defeating of a
      particular horror - the equivalent of facing their fear and overcoming
      it. As a game mechanic perhaps these aspects do not generate fate
      points for the players and can only be tapped by the GM.

      Mike


      --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, "sjsamurai007" <TomMiskey@...> wrote:
      >
      > I definitely like the idea of mental and physical attacks... I'd say
      > the 1st good look at a sanity-blasting horror would be treated as an
      > Intimidation vs Resolve attack. Failure can result in an Aspect being
      > placed on the character, such as "terrified", "gibbering in fear", or
      > "Madness!"
      >
      > You might also say that the creature attacks viewers with Intimidation
      > each round, doing mental Stress and eventually consequences, in
      > addition to any physical actions it takes. When merely looking at
      > your foe provokes an attack, I think you'll definitely have frightened
      > players running scared.
      >
      > Finally, you could say that anyone Taken Out by these Intimidation
      > attacks will gain a new Aspect, perhaps some form of madness or
      > insanity, or his hair turning white, etc.
      >
      > Samurai
      >
      >
      > --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, "lunch4worms" <peter@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Dave asked this of me:
      > >
      > > --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Hallett" <thriddle@> wrote:
      > > > I have a question for you. If D&D combat is about tactical choices -
      > > > using your resources to the best effect - what sort of choices would
      > > > you want horror combat to be about? Because choices, I think, are
      > > > where it's at. Otherwise we might as well skip the scene altogether,
      > > > in many way.
      > >
      > > and I didn't think it fair to limit the discussion.
      > >
      > > Personally, I'm more interested in storytelling and role playing, not
      > > the *tactical* choices of resource management. Others may feel
      > > differently, that's okay. I figure if the characters aren't acting
      > > scared in a frightening scene, it's because the players aren't role
      > > playing (or the GM can't describe the scene right!), not because the
      > > rule system has failed to impart a sense of urgency to the scene.
      > >
      > > But Dave's trying to write a game; for which I applaud him. I've made
      > > about a half-dozen goes at this kind of thing in my day, but never got
      > > enough together to do anything with it. So, I'm in awe that the
      > > energy is available for him to do this and I would like to encourage
      > > him (despite appearances).
      > >
      > > How are the choices, the trade-offs, a character must make in a horror
      > > conflict different from another, less terrifying, genre?
      > >
      > > I, personally, think the first step is to hit the characters with
      > > combined mental and physical attacks. Fear and sanity must be on the
      > > line. Messy deaths must be possible. But there's got to be more to
      > > it than: how do you want end this, in a straight-jacket or a body bag?
      > >
      > > Now, if FPs are the only truly diminishable resource in Fate (since
      > > their levels live beyond individual conflicts), is Dave's answer in
      > > the use of FPs in conflict? Maybe that's one mechanical answer:
      > > allowing FPs to be used to buy off the adverse effects of the
      > > conflict. FPs are a pretty valuable resource already, by making them
      > > a) necessary to survival and b) rare (by limiting refreshes through
      > > constant action) you suggest a cautious attitude for the players.
      > >
      > > Any other ideas? Any wisdom to share?
      > >
      > > l4w
      > >
      >
    • Dave Hallett
      ... Yep, just so. Victories can reduce Confusion. After all, if you managed to triumph, you can t be that wrong about everything... can you? :-) ... Well, that
      Message 33 of 33 , Oct 5, 2007
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        --- In FateRPG@yahoogroups.com, "lunch4worms" <peter@...> wrote:
        > Yah, that's sounds good. If Confusion is a stress-ish track, then
        > there are circumstances where it can (might?) come back. Maybe not so
        > frequently, though.

        Yep, just so. Victories can reduce Confusion. After all, if you
        managed to triumph, you can't be that wrong about everything... can
        you? :-)

        > So, that's the abuse limiter.

        Well, that and in my vision of things, *learning* "spells" (for want
        of a better word) has no effect on you (the only way to discover
        whether you have "learned" a spell is to cast it, and see if it
        works). It's *using* them that counts - seeing something happen that
        you can't account for.

        So the more powerful a spell, the more obviously unnatural it looks,
        the more it undermines the worldview of someone witnessing it.
        Continually casting major spells is thus a short route to the nut house.
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