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Fortress of Ice by C.J. Cherryh

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  • William C. Garthright
    Hi, I m new to the group. To get started, I thought I d just post some comments about one of my recent reads. C.J. Cherryh is one of my favorite authors, and I
    Message 1 of 19 , Oct 31, 2006
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      Hi, I'm new to the group. To get started, I thought I'd just post some
      comments about one of my recent reads.

      C.J. Cherryh is one of my favorite authors, and I really enjoyed her
      Fortress series. (I must admit, Fortress in the Eye of Time didn't sound
      appealing, so it took me awhile to get started. Since then, I've learned
      to trust my favorite authors and buy whatever they write.)

      But I thought the series had ended with Fortress of Eagles, until
      Fortress of Ice was recently released. To be honest, I'm not sure why
      she wrote this book, since it doesn't really seem to add anything to the
      story. OK, on the positive side, it's very well written and the
      characters, as always, are great. Most of them, of course, are old
      friends from previous books, and I definitely care what has happened to
      them in the meantime (this book is set 15 years after the last one).
      Cefwyn's two sons are wonderful.

      But, as I say, it doesn't add much to the story, so I really wonder why
      she felt another book was necessary. This one reads just like the
      previous four - the tone and the rather deliberate, descriptive pacing
      are similar. But it builds up to pretty much nothing. I mean, the ending
      is ... rather abrupt and incomplete, it seems to me. There's no
      indication that this is just the first in a new Fortress series, but
      I'll bet it is. If so, my opinion might change.

      But on it's own merits, this isn't one of her best works. Except for the
      ending (and perhaps I'm just too dense to understand it), there's
      nothing wrong with the book. But it doesn't offer anything new that
      wasn't already covered, very completely, in the previous four volumes.

      I expect a lot from C.J. Cherryh, so I'm always hoping for another
      masterpiece. Perhaps I just expected too much? I'd like to hear comments
      from others who've read it. Or any questions I can answer without
      ruining the story for you?

      Thanks,

      Bill
    • Gloria Oliver
      Welcome to the group, Bill! Haven t read that particular series though I have enjoyed her work in the past. Gloria Oliver www.gloraoliver.com Unveiling the
      Message 2 of 19 , Nov 1, 2006
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        Welcome to the group, Bill!

        Haven't read that particular series though I have enjoyed her work in
        the past.

        Gloria Oliver
        www.gloraoliver.com
        Unveiling the Fantastic

        --- In Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Garthright"
        <billg@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi, I'm new to the group. To get started, I thought I'd just post some
        > comments about one of my recent reads.
        >
        > C.J. Cherryh is one of my favorite authors, and I really enjoyed her
        > Fortress series. (I must admit, Fortress in the Eye of Time didn't
        sound
        > appealing, so it took me awhile to get started. Since then, I've
        learned
        > to trust my favorite authors and buy whatever they write.)
        >
        > But I thought the series had ended with Fortress of Eagles, until
        > Fortress of Ice was recently released. To be honest, I'm not sure why
        > she wrote this book, since it doesn't really seem to add anything to
        the
        > story. OK, on the positive side, it's very well written and the
        > characters, as always, are great. Most of them, of course, are old
        > friends from previous books, and I definitely care what has happened to
        > them in the meantime (this book is set 15 years after the last one).
        > Cefwyn's two sons are wonderful.
        >
        > But, as I say, it doesn't add much to the story, so I really wonder why
        > she felt another book was necessary. This one reads just like the
        > previous four - the tone and the rather deliberate, descriptive pacing
        > are similar. But it builds up to pretty much nothing. I mean, the
        ending
        > is ... rather abrupt and incomplete, it seems to me. There's no
        > indication that this is just the first in a new Fortress series, but
        > I'll bet it is. If so, my opinion might change.
        >
        > But on it's own merits, this isn't one of her best works. Except for
        the
        > ending (and perhaps I'm just too dense to understand it), there's
        > nothing wrong with the book. But it doesn't offer anything new that
        > wasn't already covered, very completely, in the previous four volumes.
        >
        > I expect a lot from C.J. Cherryh, so I'm always hoping for another
        > masterpiece. Perhaps I just expected too much? I'd like to hear
        comments
        > from others who've read it. Or any questions I can answer without
        > ruining the story for you?
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Bill
        >
      • MsTigerHawk
        I m currently reading Grendel, by John Gardner. It s a rewrite of the old Beowulf tale told from Grendel s viewpoint. It s our group read for November over at
        Message 3 of 19 , Nov 1, 2006
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          I'm currently reading Grendel, by John Gardner. It's a rewrite of the old Beowulf tale told from Grendel's viewpoint. It's our group read for November over at Best Fantasy Novels.

          Colleen


          Gloria Oliver <gioliver@...> wrote:
          Welcome to the group, Bill!

          Haven't read that particular series though I have enjoyed her work in
          the past.

          Gloria Oliver
          www.gloraoliver.com
          Unveiling the Fantastic

          --- In Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Garthright"
          <billg@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi, I'm new to the group. To get started, I thought I'd just post some
          > comments about one of my recent reads.
          >
          > C.J. Cherryh is one of my favorite authors, and I really enjoyed her
          > Fortress series. (I must admit, Fortress in the Eye of Time didn't
          sound
          > appealing, so it took me awhile to get started. Since then, I've
          learned
          > to trust my favorite authors and buy whatever they write.)
          >
          > But I thought the series had ended with Fortress of Eagles, until
          > Fortress of Ice was recently released. To be honest, I'm not sure why
          > she wrote this book, since it doesn't really seem to add anything to
          the
          > story. OK, on the positive side, it's very well written and the
          > characters, as always, are great. Most of them, of course, are old
          > friends from previous books, and I definitely care what has happened to
          > them in the meantime (this book is set 15 years after the last one).
          > Cefwyn's two sons are wonderful.
          >
          > But, as I say, it doesn't add much to the story, so I really wonder why
          > she felt another book was necessary. This one reads just like the
          > previous four - the tone and the rather deliberate, descriptive pacing
          > are similar. But it builds up to pretty much nothing. I mean, the
          ending
          > is ... rather abrupt and incomplete, it seems to me. There's no
          > indication that this is just the first in a new Fortress series, but
          > I'll bet it is. If so, my opinion might change.
          >
          > But on it's own merits, this isn't one of her best works. Except for
          the
          > ending (and perhaps I'm just too dense to understand it), there's
          > nothing wrong with the book. But it doesn't offer anything new that
          > wasn't already covered, very completely, in the previous four volumes.
          >
          > I expect a lot from C.J. Cherryh, so I'm always hoping for another
          > masterpiece. Perhaps I just expected too much? I'd like to hear
          comments
          > from others who've read it. Or any questions I can answer without
          > ruining the story for you?
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Bill
          >






          **********************************************************
          Don't miss this website if you like to read.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Leigh L.
          Okay, if this is turning into one of those recent reads threads, I ll bite :) The Lions of Al-Rassan (Guy Kay) - bit of a disappointment after all the good
          Message 4 of 19 , Nov 2, 2006
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            Okay, if this is turning into one of those 'recent reads' threads,
            I'll bite :)

            The Lions of Al-Rassan (Guy Kay) - bit of a disappointment after all
            the good things I'd heard... great characters as ever, but personally
            I found it all a bit overwrought and not a patch on A Song For Arbonne
            (that one'll be hard to beat) or even Tigana.

            Hogfather (Terry Pratchett) - in preparation for the Sky TV
            adaptation... not one of my favourite DW books originally, and re-
            reading it hasn't done much to change that. Interested in seeing how
            well (or not) they transfer its messy structure to the screen, though.
            And Joss Ackland as Ridcully = potential genius.

            Anansi Boys (Neil Gaiman) - again, engaging enough on its own but a
            bit of a disappointment after its predecessor, in this case American
            Gods. Didn't have the same epic feel, and most of the characters were
            a bit too irritating.

            Silverheart (Michael Moorcock & Storm Constantine) - not bad, some
            memorable parts, but did tend to drag a bit and never really lived up
            to the promise of the setting (or the dual authorship)...

            Now reading Predator's Gold (Philip Reeve) - sequel to Mortal
            Engines... yeah, it's a kids' book, but there's nothing wrong with
            that once in a while, right? Having fun with it so far, anyway.

            Just realised how long it's been since I read a book that genuinely
            blew me away. Although I was happily surprised by just how good Robin
            Hobb's Farseer trilogy was when I finally delved into that one a few
            months back. Now busily collecting the other series. :)

            - Leigh

            >>> I'm currently reading Grendel, by John Gardner. It's a rewrite
            >>> of the old Beowulf tale told from Grendel's viewpoint. It's our
            >>> group read for November over at Best Fantasy Novels.
            >>
            >> Haven't read that particular series though I have enjoyed her
            >> work in the past.
            >
            > Hi, I'm new to the group. To get started, I thought I'd just post
            > some comments about one of my recent reads.
          • Chrischa
            Funny, I liked Anansi Boys much more then American Gods , especially because it had a lot more humour in it; I laughed myself silly when Spider went to his
            Message 5 of 19 , Nov 2, 2006
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              Funny, I liked 'Anansi Boys' much more then 'American Gods', especially
              because it had a lot more humour in it; I laughed myself silly when
              Spider went to his brothers' office. I though the writing had a certain
              spark to it which made me smile all the time. His other book, Stardust,
              has this as well.
              I never got into American Gods too well, though I do like the idea
              behind it.

              All and all I think Neil Gaiman is one of the finest writers active
              today, for the way he plays with language and his endless fantasy.

              -Chrischa



              On 02 Nov 2006, at 12:23, Leigh L. wrote:
              > Anansi Boys (Neil Gaiman) - again, engaging enough on its own but a
              > bit of a disappointment after its predecessor, in this case American
              > Gods. Didn't have the same epic feel, and most of the characters were
              > a bit too irritating.

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • William C. Garthright
              ... I changed the subject line, since I just wanted to say thanks for the mini-reviews. I m always looking for new books and new authors (although, considering
              Message 6 of 19 , Nov 2, 2006
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                Leigh L. wrote:
                > Okay, if this is turning into one of those 'recent reads' threads, I'll bite :)
                >
                >

                I changed the subject line, since I just wanted to say thanks for the
                mini-reviews. I'm always looking for new books and new authors
                (although, considering the pile of unread books I've got here, I
                shouldn't be).

                > The Lions of Al-Rassan (Guy Kay) - bit of a disappointment after all the good things I'd heard... great characters as ever, but personally I found it all a bit overwrought and not a patch on A Song For Arbonne (that one'll be hard to beat) or even Tigana.
                >
                >

                As I recall, I really enjoyed his Fionavar Tapestry trilogy (that began
                with The Summer Tree), but I was disappointed with Tigana and haven't
                bought anything else by him. I must admit, though, that it's been a long
                time, and I don't remember Tigana at all (even after reading the first
                few pages just now).

                > Just realised how long it's been since I read a book that genuinely blew me away.

                I hesitate to mention the book I've most enjoyed recently, but zombies
                ARE fantasy, right? :-) Well,... World War Z: An Oral History of the
                Zombie War by Max Brooks is unusual, but amazingly good. It's not a
                typical book by any means, since it's written very seriously as an oral
                history - short interviews with eyewitnesses ten years after the zombie
                war is won. Hmm,... it really reads more like science fiction, despite
                the subject. But it's very good.

                Other than that, it's been a long time for me, too, since a fantasy book
                really blew me away. Not that I haven't enjoyed some books. When Demons
                Walk by Patricia Briggs (not one of her newer books, but new to me) was
                quite good, though I still think Dragon Bones is my favorite. And
                According to Crow by Ekaterina Sedia was very good, too, though a bit
                depressing. But she's an author I'll have to watch.

                Bill
              • Richard Claypool
                Hi, I too never cared for American Gods. There was a book that delbt with the same idea written several years ago. A lot of people love the book, but i
                Message 7 of 19 , Nov 2, 2006
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                  Hi,

                  I too never cared for American Gods. There was a book that delbt with the
                  same idea written several years ago. A lot of people love the book, but i
                  sertinly did not.

                  Rick


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Chrischa" <happymonster@...>
                  To: <Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 11:26 AM
                  Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] Re: Fortress of Ice by C.J. Cherryh


                  > Funny, I liked 'Anansi Boys' much more then 'American Gods', especially
                  > because it had a lot more humour in it; I laughed myself silly when
                  > Spider went to his brothers' office. I though the writing had a certain
                  > spark to it which made me smile all the time. His other book, Stardust,
                  > has this as well.
                  > I never got into American Gods too well, though I do like the idea
                  > behind it.
                  >
                  > All and all I think Neil Gaiman is one of the finest writers active
                  > today, for the way he plays with language and his endless fantasy.
                  >
                  > -Chrischa
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > On 02 Nov 2006, at 12:23, Leigh L. wrote:
                  >> Anansi Boys (Neil Gaiman) - again, engaging enough on its own but a
                  >> bit of a disappointment after its predecessor, in this case American
                  >> Gods. Didn't have the same epic feel, and most of the characters were
                  >> a bit too irritating.
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                  >
                • ana
                  I am reading my first C.J. Cherryh book, The Book Of Morgaine. I became interested after listening to a filk song by Cecelia Eng about the Gates. As I must
                  Message 8 of 19 , Nov 2, 2006
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                    I am reading my first C.J. Cherryh book, The Book Of Morgaine. I became interested after listening to a filk song by Cecelia Eng about the Gates. As I must use an alternative format for reading I was happy to have found it on the Bookshare site. Also rereading Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and finally, for at least the sixth time reread Tigana!! Need I say more?

                    Ana


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: William C. Garthright
                    To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 3:49 PM
                    Subject: [Fantasy_Books] Fortress of Ice by C.J. Cherryh


                    Hi, I'm new to the group. To get started, I thought I'd just post some
                    comments about one of my recent reads.

                    C.J. Cherryh is one of my favorite authors, and I really enjoyed her
                    Fortress series. (I must admit, Fortress in the Eye of Time didn't sound
                    appealing, so it took me awhile to get started. Since then, I've learned
                    to trust my favorite authors and buy whatever they write.)

                    But I thought the series had ended with Fortress of Eagles, until
                    Fortress of Ice was recently released. To be honest, I'm not sure why
                    she wrote this book, since it doesn't really seem to add anything to the
                    story. OK, on the positive side, it's very well written and the
                    characters, as always, are great. Most of them, of course, are old
                    friends from previous books, and I definitely care what has happened to
                    them in the meantime (this book is set 15 years after the last one).
                    Cefwyn's two sons are wonderful.

                    But, as I say, it doesn't add much to the story, so I really wonder why
                    she felt another book was necessary. This one reads just like the
                    previous four - the tone and the rather deliberate, descriptive pacing
                    are similar. But it builds up to pretty much nothing. I mean, the ending
                    is ... rather abrupt and incomplete, it seems to me. There's no
                    indication that this is just the first in a new Fortress series, but
                    I'll bet it is. If so, my opinion might change.

                    But on it's own merits, this isn't one of her best works. Except for the
                    ending (and perhaps I'm just too dense to understand it), there's
                    nothing wrong with the book. But it doesn't offer anything new that
                    wasn't already covered, very completely, in the previous four volumes.

                    I expect a lot from C.J. Cherryh, so I'm always hoping for another
                    masterpiece. Perhaps I just expected too much? I'd like to hear comments
                    from others who've read it. Or any questions I can answer without
                    ruining the story for you?

                    Thanks,

                    Bill






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                  • karl barnes
                    I think that you will LOVE The Book of Morgaine(it is an omi nibus i.e. collected works, right?). Also, Mists of Avalon is sublime. If you like this C J
                    Message 9 of 19 , Nov 2, 2006
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                      I think that you will LOVE The Book of Morgaine(it is an omi\nibus i.e. collected works, right?). Also, Mists of Avalon is sublime. If you like this C J Cherryh novel, check out her scifi novels, they are incredible.


                      ----- Original Message ----
                      From: ana <bardiccircle@...>
                      To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Thursday, November 2, 2006 5:57:16 PM
                      Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] Fortress of Ice by C.J. Cherryh

                      I am reading my first C.J. Cherryh book, The Book Of Morgaine. I became interested after listening to a filk song by Cecelia Eng about the Gates. As I must use an alternative format for reading I was happy to have found it on the Bookshare site. Also rereading Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer Bradley, and finally, for at least the sixth time reread Tigana!! Need I say more?

                      Ana

                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: William C. Garthright
                      To: Fantasy_Books@ yahoogroups. com
                      Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 3:49 PM
                      Subject: [Fantasy_Books] Fortress of Ice by C.J. Cherryh

                      Hi, I'm new to the group. To get started, I thought I'd just post some
                      comments about one of my recent reads.

                      C.J. Cherryh is one of my favorite authors, and I really enjoyed her
                      Fortress series. (I must admit, Fortress in the Eye of Time didn't sound
                      appealing, so it took me awhile to get started. Since then, I've learned
                      to trust my favorite authors and buy whatever they write.)

                      But I thought the series had ended with Fortress of Eagles, until
                      Fortress of Ice was recently released. To be honest, I'm not sure why
                      she wrote this book, since it doesn't really seem to add anything to the
                      story. OK, on the positive side, it's very well written and the
                      characters, as always, are great. Most of them, of course, are old
                      friends from previous books, and I definitely care what has happened to
                      them in the meantime (this book is set 15 years after the last one).
                      Cefwyn's two sons are wonderful.

                      But, as I say, it doesn't add much to the story, so I really wonder why
                      she felt another book was necessary. This one reads just like the
                      previous four - the tone and the rather deliberate, descriptive pacing
                      are similar. But it builds up to pretty much nothing. I mean, the ending
                      is ... rather abrupt and incomplete, it seems to me. There's no
                      indication that this is just the first in a new Fortress series, but
                      I'll bet it is. If so, my opinion might change.

                      But on it's own merits, this isn't one of her best works. Except for the
                      ending (and perhaps I'm just too dense to understand it), there's
                      nothing wrong with the book. But it doesn't offer anything new that
                      wasn't already covered, very completely, in the previous four volumes.

                      I expect a lot from C.J. Cherryh, so I'm always hoping for another
                      masterpiece. Perhaps I just expected too much? I'd like to hear comments
                      from others who've read it. Or any questions I can answer without
                      ruining the story for you?

                      Thanks,

                      Bill

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                      Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                      Version: 7.1.409 / Virus Database: 268.13.22/512 - Release Date: 11/1/2006

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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Jennifer
                      Bill wrote: As I recall, I really enjoyed his Fionavar Tapestry trilogy (that began with The Summer Tree). I did read Guy Gavriel Kay s Fionavar
                      Message 10 of 19 , Nov 3, 2006
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                        Bill wrote:
                        <snip>
                        "As I recall, I really enjoyed his Fionavar Tapestry trilogy (that began

                        with The Summer Tree)."

                        I did read Guy Gavriel Kay's Fionavar Tapestry earlier this year and
                        they made it to my keeper shelves. :)

                        <snip>
                        "I hesitate to mention the book I've most enjoyed recently, but zombies
                        ARE fantasy, right? :-) Well,... World War Z: An Oral History of the
                        Zombie War by Max Brooks is unusual, but amazingly good. It's not a
                        typical book by any means, since it's written very seriously as an oral
                        history - short interviews with eyewitnesses ten years after the zombie
                        war is won. Hmm,... it really reads more like science fiction, despite
                        the subject. But it's very good."

                        I'm defintitely interested in checking this one out. Zombies amuse me,
                        even when badly done, so I imagine I'd enjoy a seriously done zombie
                        read.

                        <snip>
                        "Other than that, it's been a long time for me, too, since a fantasy
                        book
                        really blew me away. Not that I haven't enjoyed some books. When Demons
                        Walk by Patricia Briggs (not one of her newer books, but new to me) was
                        quite good, though I still think Dragon Bones is my favorite."

                        I only found Patricia Briggs this year and I've found all but one of her
                        books so far (Masques?). Some are better than others, but all of them
                        made it to my keeper shelves. Her newest book, Moon Called, I think its
                        named, is much different from her other books, being an urban fantasy,
                        but very fun. But, I'm partial to urban fantasy. :)

                        I havent had as much time as I would like to read, but I've managed to
                        find a few favorite reads amongst a sea of mediocre ones.

                        I always enjoy Jim Butcher's Harry Dresden Files, but I was surprised to
                        find how very much I enjoyed his Spiderman novel, "The Darkest Hours".
                        I'd never
                        read a Spider-Man book before, but I'm betting they arent all so
                        engaging.

                        A new author, to me, is Fiona McIntosh. I've read the first two books
                        of her series entitled "The Quickening". Myrren's Gift was the first
                        and I was really intrigued by the storyline. Its an original plot with
                        wonderful characters. I was very anxious to get to the second book,
                        Blood & Memory, but worried that it would be another one of those "first
                        in the series is great, but the rest are crud". But, the second book is
                        very good. I like that McIntosh take risks with her storyline and
                        really puts her most lovable characters through hell, using the
                        experiences to change the character into someone even "more" rather than
                        the same person who never changes throughout their ordeals. Anyone else
                        love these as much as I?

                        Jen


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • William C. Garthright
                        ... I agree. I was particularly impressed with Dragon Bones, Dragon Blood, and Raven s Shadow (I had some problems with Raven s Strike, but most of the book
                        Message 11 of 19 , Nov 3, 2006
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                          Jennifer wrote:
                          > I only found Patricia Briggs this year and I've found all but one of her books so far (Masques?). Some are better than others, but all of them made it to my keeper shelves.

                          I agree. I was particularly impressed with Dragon Bones, Dragon Blood,
                          and Raven's Shadow (I had some problems with Raven's Strike, but most of
                          the book was good).

                          > Her newest book, Moon Called, I think its named, is much different from her other books, being an urban fantasy, but very fun. But, I'm partial to urban fantasy. :)
                          >

                          I rolled my eyes when reading the description of that one on Amazon.com.
                          And I wasn't crazy about the cover or the title. Frankly, I thought it
                          sounded terrible. But I've been very impressed with Patricia Briggs, so
                          I bought it anyway, and I'm glad I did.

                          To be honest - and this is probably the wrong thing to say in a fantasy
                          group - I wish she'd try science fiction for her next book. Just for a
                          change. I just think it's getting harder and harder to be original in
                          fantasy. And maybe I'm getting a bit tired of magic.

                          >
                          > I havent had as much time as I would like to read, but I've managed to find a few favorite reads amongst a sea of mediocre ones.
                          >
                          >

                          Thanks for the suggestions. I haven't read any of those.

                          Bill
                        • Richard Claypool
                          I can t read fantasy with jaws or windoweyes. Hearing a monotone synth drone on and on and on drives me to the brink of insanity. Rick ... From: ana
                          Message 12 of 19 , Nov 3, 2006
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                            I can't read fantasy with jaws or windoweyes. Hearing a monotone synth
                            drone on and on and on drives me to the brink of insanity.

                            Rick

                            ----- Original Message -----
                            From: "ana" <bardiccircle@...>
                            To: <Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com>
                            Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 06:57 PM
                            Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] Fortress of Ice by C.J. Cherryh


                            >I am reading my first C.J. Cherryh book, The Book Of Morgaine. I became
                            >interested after listening to a filk song by Cecelia Eng about the Gates.
                            >As I must use an alternative format for reading I was happy to have found
                            >it on the Bookshare site. Also rereading Mists of Avalon, Marion Zimmer
                            >Bradley, and finally, for at least the sixth time reread Tigana!! Need I
                            >say more?
                            >
                            > Ana
                            >
                            >
                            > ----- Original Message -----
                            > From: William C. Garthright
                            > To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                            > Sent: Tuesday, October 31, 2006 3:49 PM
                            > Subject: [Fantasy_Books] Fortress of Ice by C.J. Cherryh
                            >
                            >
                            > Hi, I'm new to the group. To get started, I thought I'd just post some
                            > comments about one of my recent reads.
                            >
                            > C.J. Cherryh is one of my favorite authors, and I really enjoyed her
                            > Fortress series. (I must admit, Fortress in the Eye of Time didn't sound
                            > appealing, so it took me awhile to get started. Since then, I've learned
                            > to trust my favorite authors and buy whatever they write.)
                            >
                            > But I thought the series had ended with Fortress of Eagles, until
                            > Fortress of Ice was recently released. To be honest, I'm not sure why
                            > she wrote this book, since it doesn't really seem to add anything to the
                            > story. OK, on the positive side, it's very well written and the
                            > characters, as always, are great. Most of them, of course, are old
                            > friends from previous books, and I definitely care what has happened to
                            > them in the meantime (this book is set 15 years after the last one).
                            > Cefwyn's two sons are wonderful.
                            >
                            > But, as I say, it doesn't add much to the story, so I really wonder why
                            > she felt another book was necessary. This one reads just like the
                            > previous four - the tone and the rather deliberate, descriptive pacing
                            > are similar. But it builds up to pretty much nothing. I mean, the ending
                            > is ... rather abrupt and incomplete, it seems to me. There's no
                            > indication that this is just the first in a new Fortress series, but
                            > I'll bet it is. If so, my opinion might change.
                            >
                            > But on it's own merits, this isn't one of her best works. Except for the
                            > ending (and perhaps I'm just too dense to understand it), there's
                            > nothing wrong with the book. But it doesn't offer anything new that
                            > wasn't already covered, very completely, in the previous four volumes.
                            >
                            > I expect a lot from C.J. Cherryh, so I'm always hoping for another
                            > masterpiece. Perhaps I just expected too much? I'd like to hear comments
                            > from others who've read it. Or any questions I can answer without
                            > ruining the story for you?
                            >
                            > Thanks,
                            >
                            > Bill
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                            >
                            >
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                            > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
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                            > 11/1/2006
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                            >
                            >
                          • margaret mcgee
                            Hi i have recently finished The Tanir Triad bu Lynn Flewelling and really enjoyed it, im also re-reading the empire trilogy by raymond feist and janny wurst
                            Message 13 of 19 , Nov 4, 2006
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                              Hi
                              i have recently finished The Tanir Triad bu Lynn Flewelling and really
                              enjoyed it, im also re-reading the empire trilogy by raymond feist and janny
                              wurst

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                            • margaret mcgee
                              Hi your post made me think So a question Do you keep all your books or part with them. i for one cant bear to part with any and so have a house stuffed with
                              Message 14 of 19 , Nov 4, 2006
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                                Hi your post made me think So a question
                                Do you keep all your books or part with them.
                                i for one cant bear to part with any and so have a house stuffed with books
                                ive read.
                                my husband does complain sometimes but i point to his car magazines and he
                                shuts up lol
                                bw
                                margaret
                                uk


                                >From: "William C. Garthright" <billg@...>
                                >Reply-To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                                >To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                                >Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] Recent Reads
                                >Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2006 08:20:35 -0600
                                >
                                >Jennifer wrote:
                                > > I only found Patricia Briggs this year and I've found all but one of her
                                >books so far (Masques?). Some are better than others, but all of them made
                                >it to my keeper shelves.
                                >
                                >I agree. I was particularly impressed with Dragon Bones, Dragon Blood,
                                >and Raven's Shadow (I had some problems with Raven's Strike, but most of
                                >the book was good).
                                >
                                > > Her newest book, Moon Called, I think its named, is much different from
                                >her other books, being an urban fantasy, but very fun. But, I'm partial to
                                >urban fantasy. :)
                                > >
                                >
                                >I rolled my eyes when reading the description of that one on Amazon.com.
                                >And I wasn't crazy about the cover or the title. Frankly, I thought it
                                >sounded terrible. But I've been very impressed with Patricia Briggs, so
                                >I bought it anyway, and I'm glad I did.
                                >
                                >To be honest - and this is probably the wrong thing to say in a fantasy
                                >group - I wish she'd try science fiction for her next book. Just for a
                                >change. I just think it's getting harder and harder to be original in
                                >fantasy. And maybe I'm getting a bit tired of magic.
                                >
                                > >
                                > > I havent had as much time as I would like to read, but I've managed to
                                >find a few favorite reads amongst a sea of mediocre ones.
                                > >
                                > >
                                >
                                >Thanks for the suggestions. I haven't read any of those.
                                >
                                >Bill
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                >

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                              • William C. Garthright
                                Heh, heh. I can t stand to part with them either. I ve got bookcases on every wall and they re overflowing. Most of them, I can t even remember (this past
                                Message 15 of 19 , Nov 4, 2006
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                                  Heh, heh. I can't stand to part with them either. I've got bookcases on
                                  every wall and they're overflowing. Most of them, I can't even remember
                                  (this past year, I've started keeping brief notes on books I read so at
                                  least I can remember if I liked a book or not).

                                  I often re-read books, but a few years ago, I decided it was stupid to
                                  keep books I don't even like! Since then, I've gotten rid of a few books
                                  I really hated,... but not many. Part of the problem is that I don't
                                  finish books I dislike, so I keep them - partially read - in case I want
                                  to try them again sometime.

                                  Bottom line is, I like books so much that I just can't stand to get rid
                                  of them.

                                  Bill


                                  margaret mcgee wrote:
                                  > Hi your post made me think So a question
                                  > Do you keep all your books or part with them.
                                  > i for one cant bear to part with any and so have a house stuffed with books
                                  > ive read.
                                  > my husband does complain sometimes but i point to his car magazines and he
                                  > shuts up lol
                                  > bw
                                  > margaret
                                  > uk
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                • Kayla Grant
                                  I ve always considered books like old friends and I just can t seem to ever part with them...I also like to re-read my books and I guess having them in my
                                  Message 16 of 19 , Nov 4, 2006
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                                    I've always considered books like old friends and I just can't seem
                                    to ever part with them...I also like to re-read my books and I guess
                                    having them in my bookshelf saves me the trouble of hunting them down
                                    again!

                                    I recently read some of Kelley Armstrong's women of the otherworld
                                    series. There weren't bad, the set I read dealt mainly with Elena and
                                    the werewolves and not the other supernaturals but I was impressed.

                                    Kayla

                                    --- In Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com, "William C. Garthright"
                                    <billg@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > Heh, heh. I can't stand to part with them either. I've got
                                    bookcases on
                                    > every wall and they're overflowing. Most of them, I can't even
                                    remember
                                    > (this past year, I've started keeping brief notes on books I read
                                    so at
                                    > least I can remember if I liked a book or not).
                                    >
                                    > I often re-read books, but a few years ago, I decided it was stupid
                                    to
                                    > keep books I don't even like! Since then, I've gotten rid of a few
                                    books
                                    > I really hated,... but not many. Part of the problem is that I
                                    don't
                                    > finish books I dislike, so I keep them - partially read - in case I
                                    want
                                    > to try them again sometime.
                                    >
                                    > Bottom line is, I like books so much that I just can't stand to get
                                    rid
                                    > of them.
                                    >
                                    > Bill
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > margaret mcgee wrote:
                                    > > Hi your post made me think So a question
                                    > > Do you keep all your books or part with them.
                                    > > i for one cant bear to part with any and so have a house stuffed
                                    with books
                                    > > ive read.
                                    > > my husband does complain sometimes but i point to his car
                                    magazines and he
                                    > > shuts up lol
                                    > > bw
                                    > > margaret
                                    > > uk
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    >
                                  • ana
                                    I couldn t agree with you more! Get rid of a book? Not in this household! Ana ... From: William C. Garthright To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com Sent: Saturday,
                                    Message 17 of 19 , Nov 5, 2006
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                                      I couldn't agree with you more! Get rid of a book? Not in this household!

                                      Ana


                                      ----- Original Message -----
                                      From: William C. Garthright
                                      To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                                      Sent: Saturday, November 04, 2006 8:03 AM
                                      Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] A Question ?


                                      Heh, heh. I can't stand to part with them either. I've got bookcases on
                                      every wall and they're overflowing. Most of them, I can't even remember
                                      (this past year, I've started keeping brief notes on books I read so at
                                      least I can remember if I liked a book or not).

                                      I often re-read books, but a few years ago, I decided it was stupid to
                                      keep books I don't even like! Since then, I've gotten rid of a few books
                                      I really hated,... but not many. Part of the problem is that I don't
                                      finish books I dislike, so I keep them - partially read - in case I want
                                      to try them again sometime.

                                      Bottom line is, I like books so much that I just can't stand to get rid
                                      of them.

                                      Bill

                                      margaret mcgee wrote:
                                      > Hi your post made me think So a question
                                      > Do you keep all your books or part with them.
                                      > i for one cant bear to part with any and so have a house stuffed with books
                                      > ive read.
                                      > my husband does complain sometimes but i point to his car magazines and he
                                      > shuts up lol
                                      > bw
                                      > margaret
                                      > uk
                                      >
                                      >
                                      >





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                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • Gloria
                                      I enjoyed the book, but did not find it to be all that original or that outstanding. Though I guess if you ve never run across a book like it you might be
                                      Message 18 of 19 , Nov 7, 2006
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                                        I enjoyed the book, but did not find it to be all that original or that
                                        outstanding. Though I guess if you've never run across a book like it you
                                        might be wowed over or something. Just like people did with Crouching
                                        Tiger, Hidden Dragon - lots of people freaked over it when old Hong Kong
                                        film fans just saw it as a much better done usual fare film. :P

                                        Gloria Oliver
                                        www.gloriaoliver.com
                                        Unveiling the Fantastic




                                        -----Original Message-----
                                        From: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                                        [mailto:Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com]On Behalf Of Richard Claypool
                                        Sent: Thursday, November 02, 2006 1:29 PM
                                        To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                                        Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] Re: Fortress of Ice by C.J. Cherryh


                                        Hi,

                                        I too never cared for American Gods. There was a book that delbt with the
                                        same idea written several years ago. A lot of people love the book, but i
                                        sertinly did not.

                                        Rick


                                        .



                                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                      • Leigh L.
                                        ... Where s the love for American Gods? Maybe it s just me then. The only other Gaiman book I d read prior to that was Stardust, which I thought was okay but
                                        Message 19 of 19 , Nov 7, 2006
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                                          > Funny, I liked 'Anansi Boys' much more then 'American Gods',
                                          > especially because it had a lot more humour in it; I laughed myself
                                          > silly when Spider went to his brothers' office. I though the writing
                                          > had a certain spark to it which made me smile all the time. His
                                          > other book, Stardust, has this as well.

                                          > I too never cared for American Gods.

                                          > I enjoyed the book, but did not find it to be all that original or
                                          > that outstanding. Though I guess if you've never run across a book
                                          > like it you might be wowed over or something.

                                          Where's the love for American Gods?

                                          Maybe it's just me then. The only other Gaiman book I'd read prior to
                                          that was Stardust, which I thought was okay but not great. American
                                          Gods raised the bar substantially, and reading his superb short story
                                          collection Smoke and Mirrors after that made me expect great things of
                                          Anansi Boys, but it wasn't to be (not for me, at least). Ah well.

                                          As for the eternal dilemma of whether to keep or dump your books, all
                                          I can say is don't have too many kids. :) A family of five crammed
                                          into two-and-a-half bedrooms leaves precious little room for things
                                          like the precious book hoard that I've been building since my Uni
                                          days, so lately I've started offloading books as I read them (and a
                                          few that I never liked that much anyway) in an attempt to stave off
                                          the inevitable for a few months longer...

                                          - Leigh
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