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  • karl barnes
    FInished reading book six of the Hawk and Fisher: The Bones Of Haven by Simon R Green and a horror/cop thriller Angel by Garry D. Kilworth. Both books were
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 26, 2003
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      FInished reading book six of the Hawk and Fisher: The Bones Of Haven
      by Simon R Green and a horror/cop thriller Angel by Garry D.
      Kilworth. Both books were satisfying and fast reads. Though not
      major literary novels, they did entertain and did have some thoughts
      and ideas about what is good and evil. And the characters did grow
      from the begining to the end. Now onto George Stewart's Earth
      Abides .
    • karl barnes
      Mistress Marsham s Repose by the renowned T H White is a fantastical, literary tale of a young girl,Maria and her adventures on Mitress Marsham s Repose, an
      Message 2 of 7 , Aug 5, 2003
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        Mistress Marsham's Repose by the renowned T H White is a fantastical,
        literary tale of a young girl,Maria and her adventures on Mitress
        Marsham's Repose, an island in the middle of a lake. The story about
        finding the surviving Lilliputians and Maria is sweet, solid and
        silly.

        Maria is an orphan of a wealth nobility that has fallen on hard
        times, so it seems. Her governess, Miss Brown and her custodian, The
        Vicar are two bumbling evil adults that have no room for fun and too
        much room for avarice.Only The Professor and the cook, Mrs. Noakes
        are Maria's allies and friends, until she meets the Lilliputs(i.e.
        The Little People from Gulliver's Travels). They teach her about
        respect and loyalty, to treat ALL living things as she would wish to
        be treated. Sure, it comes off a bit dated, yet it is charmingly told
        and would make a wonderful children's bed time story, even today.

        Now, I might even try reading The Once and Future King by White. But
        not now, since I'm starting Jo Clayton's scifi/fantasy Diadem of the
        Stars.
      • Amy Harlib
        aharlib@earthlink.net ... I thought this was even better than The Once and Future King! But ... I love Jo Clayton s books! Amy
        Message 3 of 7 , Aug 6, 2003
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          aharlib@...



          > Mistress Marsham's Repose by the renowned T H White is a fantastical,
          > literary tale of a young girl,Maria and her adventures on Mitress
          > Marsham's Repose, an island in the middle of a lake. The story about
          > finding the surviving Lilliputians and Maria is sweet, solid and
          > silly.
          >
          > Maria is an orphan of a wealth nobility that has fallen on hard
          > times, so it seems. Her governess, Miss Brown and her custodian, The
          > Vicar are two bumbling evil adults that have no room for fun and too
          > much room for avarice.Only The Professor and the cook, Mrs. Noakes
          > are Maria's allies and friends, until she meets the Lilliputs(i.e.
          > The Little People from Gulliver's Travels). They teach her about
          > respect and loyalty, to treat ALL living things as she would wish to
          > be treated. Sure, it comes off a bit dated, yet it is charmingly told
          > and would make a wonderful children's bed time story, even today.
          >
          > Now, I might even try reading The Once and Future King by White.

          I thought this was even better than The Once and Future King!

          But
          > not now, since I'm starting Jo Clayton's scifi/fantasy Diadem of the
          > Stars.
          >

          I love Jo Clayton's books!
          Amy
        • karl barnes
          The last book in the trilogy called Finnbranch Trilogy by Paul Hazel. This was a hard novel, trilogy, to get through and make heads or tales of. The first
          Message 4 of 7 , Jan 31, 2004
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            The last book in the trilogy called Finnbranch Trilogy by Paul
            Hazel. This was a hard novel, trilogy, to get through and make heads
            or tales of. The first book, Yearwood, starts out as a finding one's
            destiny type of story with secrets of family and secrets mystic. In
            fact, the narrator doesn't even have a name for most of the first
            person narrative.

            He settles with Finn though this changes, sometimes confusingly
            throughout the book. Finn goes looking for some way to prove that he
            is worthy of the throne abicated by the old king and goes to an
            island to kill an unkillable witch, who turns out to be this
            beautiful, yet fey girl called Gear. He falls in love with Gear and
            they have one night of passion. Gear helps defeat the true 'villain'
            which are the ghosts of the land, but Finn finds out that Gear is
            really his sister and she will bear Finn a son. Finn flees and goes
            in search for his father/old king that though dead still lives. He
            finds the old king at a sacred/haunted grove and fights him for many
            things, but revenge seems the big theme. At the end he kills his
            sealman father/king of the realm and takes the title onto himself or
            so it seems.

            The second novel, Undersea, has Finn travelling from defeating his
            father and somehow assuming the guise and appearance of him, at
            least to the people, but he is still Finn for the most part. This is
            where the book gets weird, Finn sees many worlds from the old woman
            of the village that thinks of him as the king of old. He sets off to
            find the focal point of these worlds on a ship, more like a boat
            than anything else and becomes embroiled in a terrible storm. Finn
            dreams that he IS his father fighting a six-armed giant, who he(Finn
            or his father) put on an island to protect certain secrets. The
            giant, known by many names, but settles on Redd Man, defeats Finn/
            old King and then the next moment, Finn is brought unto the land.
            Where he learns that the Redd Man is protecting the ways to the
            Undersea, the kingdom of his father and thus Finn's world,too.

            The Undersea is really the realm of the dead and Finn with two
            others cross over to it and make a journey to the capitol. Finn
            meets his son, who is there and not, and tells him that he ,Finn,
            will kill him but wanted the chance to tell his son that he loved
            him. Finn also makes a deal with death, since somehow he becomes
            Duinn(Death) and gives one of his travelling friends immortality,
            Wyck, a stables boy. Thus ends the second book.
          • karl barnes
            Just finished reading Simon R Green s latest Nightside novel: Nightingale s Lament . It was enjoyable with some humorous parts , but I felt that the ending was
            Message 5 of 7 , May 31, 2004
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              Just finished reading Simon R Green's latest Nightside novel:
              Nightingale's Lament . It was enjoyable with some humorous parts ,
              but I felt that the ending was too much of 'god in the machine'
              type. It seems that every clue, meeting and back story in the book
              connected at the end. Not that I disliked it, but sometimes not
              everything in a book needs to be part of the solution at the end.

              Also, there was a chapter of a book called Dead To The World by
              Charlaine Harris from her Southern Vampire series. Has anyone read
              any of her books? From what I read, she is a lively author and the
              prose sucked me right into the story. So, it looks like another
              author that I will have to read.
            • Leigh L.
              ... Simon R. Green is one of those authors on my to read list who ll probably never progress to my now reading list, thanks to the size of my unread
              Message 6 of 7 , Jun 2, 2004
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                > Just finished reading Simon R Green's latest Nightside novel:
                > Nightingale's Lament . It was enjoyable with some humorous parts ,
                > but I felt that the ending was too much of 'god in the machine'
                > type. It seems that every clue, meeting and back story in the book
                > connected at the end. Not that I disliked it, but sometimes not
                > everything in a book needs to be part of the solution at the end.

                Simon R. Green is one of those authors on my 'to read' list who'll
                probably never progress to my 'now reading' list, thanks to the size
                of my unread backlog...

                My own 'just finished': Pratchett's Night Watch, as usual a great
                read but still somehow not the Ultimate Discworld Novel that I'd
                been led to expect. Before that, White Silence, a Highlander series
                tie-in (I know, I know, but it was actually pretty good), and right
                now I'm hacking my way through Guy Kay's Tigana. Not quite A Song
                For Arbonne quality so far, but I'm keeping my hopes up.

                Oh, and just to confuse myself I'm steadily making my way through
                the Thieves' World series at the same time - nothing amazing but
                entertaining enough, though I'm at a point in the series now where
                I'm really starting to wish that they'd managed to get some new
                authors involved...

                - Leigh
              • sandra panicucci
                I read the Thieves World series when I still had to wait for the next one to be published after the first several books I became disillusioned with the
                Message 7 of 7 , Jun 2, 2004
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                  I read the Thieves World series when I still had to
                  wait for the next one to be published after the first
                  several books I became disillusioned with the majority
                  of the stories ever making any sense. I continued to
                  read them but by the end was sort of glad it was over.
                  For better or for worse, and in my opinion worse.
                  Sandra

                  > Oh, and just to confuse myself I'm steadily making
                  > my way through
                  > the Thieves' World series at the same time - nothing
                  > amazing but
                  > entertaining enough, though I'm at a point in the
                  > series now where
                  > I'm really starting to wish that they'd managed to
                  > get some new
                  > authors involved...
                  >
                  > - Leigh
                  >
                  >
                  >





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