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Re: [Fantasy_Books] The author has given us the full article

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  • hellMice, the Return of Moonbeam
    I think he s allowed to his personal opinion, and his own biases, gender or otherwise, but I also think he s ... ahem ... full of it :) This is obviously an
    Message 1 of 4 , Aug 31, 2002
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      I think he's allowed to his personal opinion, and his own biases, gender or otherwise, but I also think he's ... ahem ... full of it :) This is obviously an essay defending his personal tastes without a shred of proof beyond his own opinion, which he shows by stating right out, "Today I think females outnumber male authors and
      though I have no statistics to draw upon." He thinks, and he has no proof :)

      Michelle
      Tell me what you think...he's not ready to come out of the closet as of
      yet...says he witnessed a stoning in Saudi Arabia a short while ago
      and...well he's a little shy but I find it very interesting and if you do he
      may publish it. What he wrote to me was a sumation of his feelings on the
      matter. Consider it anonymous for now.


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Scott Bakker
      This is silly. The question is whether he s saying, 1) women can t write SF, or 2) he doesn t like SF written by women. Since the first claim is over the top
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 1, 2002
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        This is silly. The question is whether he's saying, 1) women can't write SF,
        or 2) he doesn't like SF written by women. Since the first claim is over the
        top (as most absolute value-judgments are), we have to settle for the
        second, which makes him sound like a misogynist.

        Embarrassing.

        scott/


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Kerry Orchard" <kerry@...>
        To: <Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, August 31, 2002 2:48 PM
        Subject: [Fantasy_Books] The author has given us the full article


        > Tell me what you think...he's not ready to come out of the closet as of
        > yet...says he witnessed a stoning in Saudi Arabia a short while ago
        > and...well he's a little shy but I find it very interesting and if you do
        he
        > may publish it. What he wrote to me was a sumation of his feelings on the
        > matter. Consider it anonymous for now.
        >
        > THE FEMINIZATION OF SCIENCE FICTION
        >
        > "Space Opera" is most often used as a term of derision, even within the
        > field of science fiction sometimes, yet space opera is the type of
        > testosterone-driven science fiction that I grew up on--and still love,
        done
        > properly. By that, I mean character and idea and action orientated,
        without
        > a lot of fluff. Unfortunately, it is becoming harder and harder to find
        > these days and I attribute it to one primary factor: the advent of so many
        > females coming into the field, first into editorial positions and
        > subsequently as authors. Today I think females outnumber male authors and
        > though I have no statistics to draw upon, I believe they far outnumber men
        > as editors. And editors are the ones who select the novels to be
        published.
        >
        >
        > I have on my "keeper" shelf about a thousand science fiction novels and I
        > can count on the fingers of one hand the ones written by women. Now please
        > note: during decades of reading science fiction, I paid absolutely no
        > attention to whether they were written by men or women; I just tried my
        best
        > to read every science fiction novel in the universe; an impossible task I
        > admit, but I tried. The books I liked enough to re-read made it to my
        shelf;
        > the others went into the trade box.
        >
        > About ten years ago I had the idea for an article: "The 100 Most Readable
        > and Re-readable Science Fiction Novels Ever Written". I began gathering
        > data, using my shelves and Blish's "The Billion Year Spree" as source
        > material. Eventually I winnowed the selections down to a hundred, and
        > suddenly noticed a singular fact. Know what? There wasn't a single female
        > author listed! That's when I first discovered the dearth of female authors
        > on my re-read shelves and their lack (in my opinion) of ability to write
        > really good science fiction. Or let me re-phrase that: science fiction
        that
        > I like. Adequate, yes. Occasionally good, okay. Great? Sorry, hardly any I
        > can mention. Nancy Kress is about the only exception I can name.
        >
        > Female friends and relatives will tell me about or give me books by
        science
        > fiction authors, praising their work to the skies. I have tried over and
        > over again but they just don't work for me. Traditional science fiction
        hasn
        > 't gone to the dogs--it has just lost its balls.
        >
        > Is this good or bad? Well, it's neither, just a reflection of the times
        when
        > women have entered (and changed) just about every imaginable profession.
        > Science fiction has gone and is going in a direction that science fiction
        > historians will recognize (if they already haven't) as the generation when
        > science fiction became feminized. R.I.P. Space Opera. I knew you well.
        >
        > The End
        >
        >
        > Reading: Cat's Cradle by Lizbie Brown & phillip K Dick Minority report
        >
        > Kerry Orchard <http://www.kerryorchard.com/>
        > The Thoughtmaster's Conduit: 2002 EPPIE finalist best fantasy
        > ISBN 1-58608-561-1 New Concepts Publishing Paperback&e-book av NOW
        >
        > On a world invaded by the Daha'et, the undead, only one
        > force can destroy those who cannot be killed. . .and only
        > one man and one woman can wield that force
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >
      • Allan Griffith
        ... From: Scott Bakker ... SF, ... the ... He does sound pretty sad. Maybe he s a writer who can t get published, so he s looking
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 1, 2002
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          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Scott Bakker" <sbakker@...>
          > This is silly. The question is whether he's saying, 1) women can't write
          SF,
          > or 2) he doesn't like SF written by women. Since the first claim is over
          the
          > top (as most absolute value-judgments are), we have to settle for the
          > second, which makes him sound like a misogynist.
          >
          > Embarrassing.

          He does sound pretty sad. Maybe he's a writer who can't get published, so
          he's looking for someone to blame? Or maybe he's bitter towards women
          because they won't go out with him.

          Al
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