Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Genres of Fantasy

Expand Messages
  • Jennifer Kennedy
    Louise, in the U.S. fantasy isn t even called science fantasy. It s just fantasy. Period. There s science-fiction, of course, which is entirely separate.
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 25, 2000
      Louise, in the U.S. fantasy isn't even called "science fantasy." It's just
      fantasy. Period. There's science-fiction, of course, which is entirely
      separate. I suppose there are a few authors who take it upon themselves to
      subclassify the subject matter of their novels -- into "Darwinian," or
      "metaphysical," or what have you -- but there aren't any official
      subcategories. At least not that I'm aware of. The fantasy section of my
      local book stores don't have separate labels for "Darwinian" and
      "metaphysical," if that's what you mean. *grins*

      However, I think it's fascinating that a few Australian authors do that.
      But are there any official subcategories for fantasy in Australia, that you
      might even find labels for on bookshelves?



      -------------------------
      Jennifer Kennedy
      Monitor & Moderator: "Wheel of Time" eGroups Mailing List

      E-mail Contact: jkennedy@...
      ICQ # : 10968954
      Yahoo! Messenger ID: Tabheair



      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "Louise Cusack" <louisecusack@...>
      To: <Fantasy_Books@egroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, October 25, 2000 6:22 AM
      Subject: [Fantasy_Books] sub genres of Fantasy


      > A question:
      >
      > In Australia there are several fantasy authors who label their work as a
      > 'type' of fantasy. Ian Irvine, who writes the "View from the Mirror"
      > series (soon to be released in the US) calls his fiction Darwinian
      > Fantasy, and Traci Harding who writes the Ancient Futures series writes
      > what she calls Metaphysical Fantasy.
      >
      > Do other authors fit their books into sub-genres within the Fantasy or
      > Speculative Fiction banner? Or is 'Science Fantasy' the only type of
      > fantasy everyone else has heard of?
      >
      > Louise
      > louisecusack@...
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • sphinx
      Genres are an interesting sort of conceit. The fact of the matter is that Genre s are only used for figuring out which shelf to put the book on. The funny
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 25, 2000
        Genres are an interesting sort of conceit. The fact of the matter is that
        Genre's are only used for figuring out which shelf to put the book on. The
        funny thing is, no sooner had this orginizational technique been developed
        than it suddenly bloomed into caste warefare with writers in some genre's
        holding themselves as superior to other genres just by virtue of where the
        book sits in the store. The problem is, snobbish critics went along with
        this bizzare conceit and declared "Mainstream" to to be the king of all
        genres, and established a hierarchy of fiction which puts fantasy and
        romance smack at the bottom (never mind that romance out-sells all other
        genres.)

        Now a great many writers, publishers, what have you, try to distinguish
        themselves from the lower-caste genre's by hyphenating them. It's not just
        a fantasy, its a "metaphysical-fantasy." This has no bearing on genre
        (which, as noted before, is nothing more that a
        where-in-the-store-do-I-shelve-it sort of distinction) but it does make the
        writer feel better.

        As far as these pointless distincions go, I've seen fantasy hyphenated with:
        dark, epic, metaphysical, modern, heroic, and thriller.

        Curtis Craddock
        Read "Sparrow's Flight" at http://www.ruralnet.net/~sphinx

        > Louise, in the U.S. fantasy isn't even called "science fantasy." It's
        just
        > fantasy. Period. There's science-fiction, of course, which is entirely
        > separate. I suppose there are a few authors who take it upon themselves
        to
        > subclassify the subject matter of their novels -- into "Darwinian," or
        > "metaphysical," or what have you -- but there aren't any official
        > subcategories. At least not that I'm aware of. The fantasy section of my
        > local book stores don't have separate labels for "Darwinian" and
        > "metaphysical," if that's what you mean. *grins*
        >
        > However, I think it's fascinating that a few Australian authors do that.
        > But are there any official subcategories for fantasy in Australia, that
        you
        > might even find labels for on bookshelves?
      • cycocat3
        ... just ... the ... YOU CAN IMAGINE HOW I FEEL. EVEN THOUGH MY BOOK IS FANTASY , THERE IS NO REAL CATEGORY FOR IT. FACT IS, EVEN THOUGH E-PUBLISHING IS AN
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 25, 2000
          > Now a great many writers, publishers, what have you, try to distinguish
          > themselves from the lower-caste genre's by hyphenating them. It's not
          just
          > a fantasy, its a "metaphysical-fantasy." This has no bearing on genre
          > (which, as noted before, is nothing more that a
          > where-in-the-store-do-I-shelve-it sort of distinction) but it does make
          the
          > writer feel better.
          >
          > As far as these pointless distincions go, I've seen fantasy hyphenated
          with:
          > dark, epic, metaphysical, modern, heroic, and thriller.
          >
          > Curtis Craddock
          > Read "Sparrow's Flight" at http://www.ruralnet.net/~sphinx
          >
          YOU CAN IMAGINE HOW I FEEL. EVEN THOUGH MY BOOK IS "FANTASY", THERE
          IS NO REAL CATEGORY FOR IT. FACT IS, EVEN THOUGH E-PUBLISHING IS AN INFANT
          PHENOMENA, READERS TEND TO THINK THAT IF IT'S AN "ONLINE BOOK" THEN THERE
          HAS TO BE SOMETHING WRONG WITH IT. HOPEFULLY TIME WILL CHANGE THIS OUTLOOK.
          THERE ARE A LOT OF WRITERS OUT THERE THAT DESERVE TO BE PUBLISHED BUT THERE
          SIMPLY ISN'T ENOUGH SHELF SPACE, MONEY OR TREES TO ACCOMEDATE THEM ALL. AND
          EVEN THOUGH SOME PEOPLE ARE SICK AND TIRED OF HEARING ABOUT IT, HERE IT IS
          AGAIN:

          AFTER THE WAR by J. L. Navarro (an e-book novel, 231 pp, 1MB) is now
          available for download from http://www.mightywords.com It is a
          surrealistic, unconventional novel in the tradition of Carlos Castaneda and
          Rod Serling. The adventure takes place in a remote Mexican village
          inhabited by gunfighters and magicians and other strange and bizarre
          characters. It's a quick and easy read. Very entertaining for fans of
          fantastic fiction. Due to adult themes, this book may not be suitable for
          younger readers.

          THIS BOOK IS GUARANTEED TO BLOW YOUR MIND!!!!!!!!!



          ____________NetZero Free Internet Access and Email_________
          Download Now http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html
          Request a CDROM 1-800-333-3633
          ___________________________________________________________
        • Heidi H.
          If I see one more ad for this book, I m never going to go near it! I understand you re excited about publishing, but I think you re overdoing it. --Heidi ...
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 25, 2000
            If I see one more ad for this book, I'm never going to go near it! I
            understand you're excited about publishing, but I think you're overdoing it.

            --Heidi


            >AFTER THE WAR by J. L. Navarro (an e-book novel, 231 pp, 1MB) is now
            >available for download from http://www.mightywords.com It is a
            >surrealistic, unconventional novel in the tradition of Carlos Castaneda and
            >Rod Serling. The adventure takes place in a remote Mexican village
            >inhabited by gunfighters and magicians and other strange and bizarre
            >characters. It's a quick and easy read. Very entertaining for fans of
            >fantastic fiction. Due to adult themes, this book may not be suitable for
            >younger readers.

            _________________________________________________________________________
            Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com

            Share information about yourself, create your own public profile at
            http://profiles.msn.com
          • gatewayhm@t-online.de
            I wanted to say the same!! Valerie
            Message 5 of 14 , Oct 25, 2000
              I wanted to say the same!!

              Valerie

              Heidi H. schrieb:
              > If I see one more ad for this book, I'm never going to go near it! I
              > understand you're excited about publishing, but I think you're overdoing it.
              >
              > --Heidi
              >
              >
              > >AFTER THE WAR by J. L. Navarro (an e-book novel, 231 pp, 1MB) is now
              > >available for download from http://www.mightywords.com It is a
              > >surrealistic, unconventional novel in the tradition of Carlos Castaneda and
              > >Rod Serling. The adventure takes place in a remote Mexican village
              > >inhabited by gunfighters and magicians and other strange and bizarre
              > >characters. It's a quick and easy read. Very entertaining for fans of
              > >fantastic fiction. Due to adult themes, this book may not be suitable for
              > >younger readers.
              >
              > _________________________________________________________________________
              > Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com
              >
              > Share information about yourself, create your own public profile at
              > http://profiles.msn.com
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
            • cycocat3
              ... it. ... ACTUALLY, I M NOT. I JUST HAVE A LOT OF TIME ON MY HANDS. IN ANY CASE, PLEASE TAKE ME OFF YOUR LIST. AND, JUST FOR OLD TIME S SAKE: AFTER THE WAR
              Message 6 of 14 , Oct 25, 2000
                > If I see one more ad for this book, I'm never going to go near it! I
                > > understand you're excited about publishing, but I think you're overdoing
                it.
                > >
                > > --Heidi
                > >
                > >
                ACTUALLY, I'M NOT. I JUST HAVE A LOT OF TIME ON MY HANDS. IN ANY CASE,
                PLEASE TAKE ME OFF YOUR LIST.
                AND, JUST FOR OLD TIME'S SAKE:

                AFTER THE WAR by J. L. Navarro (an e-book novel, 231 pp, 1MB) is now
                available for download from http://www.mightywords.com It is a
                surrealistic, unconventional novel in the tradition of Carlos Castaneda and
                Rod Serling. The adventure takes place in a remote Mexican village
                inhabited by gunfighters and magicians and other strange and bizarre
                characters. It's a quick and easy read. Very entertaining for fans of
                fantastic fiction. Due to adult themes, this book may not be suitable for
                younger readers.

                THIS BOOK IS GUARANTEED TO BLOW YOUR MIND!!!!!!!!!

                >


                ____________NetZero Free Internet Access and Email_________
                Download Now http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html
                Request a CDROM 1-800-333-3633
                ___________________________________________________________
              • marykae
                you have to take yourself off the list sweetie. From: cycocat3 Reply-To: Fantasy_Books@egroups.com Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 17:10:13
                Message 7 of 14 , Oct 25, 2000
                  you have to take yourself off the list sweetie.

                  From: "cycocat3" <cycocat3@...>
                  Reply-To: Fantasy_Books@egroups.com
                  Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 17:10:13 -0700
                  To: <Fantasy_Books@egroups.com>
                  Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] Re: Genres of Fantasy





                  > If I see one more ad for this book, I'm never going to go near it! I
                  > > understand you're excited about publishing, but I think you're overdoing
                  it.
                  > >
                  > > --Heidi
                  > >
                  > >
                  ACTUALLY, I'M NOT. I JUST HAVE A LOT OF TIME ON MY HANDS. IN ANY CASE,
                  PLEASE TAKE ME OFF YOUR LIST.
                  AND, JUST FOR OLD TIME'S SAKE:

                  AFTER THE WAR by J. L. Navarro (an e-book novel, 231 pp, 1MB) is now
                  available for download from http://www.mightywords.com It is a
                  surrealistic, unconventional novel in the tradition of Carlos Castaneda and
                  Rod Serling. The adventure takes place in a remote Mexican village
                  inhabited by gunfighters and magicians and other strange and bizarre
                  characters. It's a quick and easy read. Very entertaining for fans of
                  fantastic fiction. Due to adult themes, this book may not be suitable for
                  younger readers.

                  THIS BOOK IS GUARANTEED TO BLOW YOUR MIND!!!!!!!!!

                  >


                  ____________NetZero Free Internet Access and Email_________
                  Download Now http://www.netzero.net/download/index.html
                  Request a CDROM 1-800-333-3633
                  ___________________________________________________________

                  eGroups Sponsor





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Louise Cusack
                  ... Jennifer ... The sort of sub-genre I meant was like High Fantasy which I ve seen somewhere and presumably means the sword&sorcery type story. If that s
                  Message 8 of 14 , Oct 25, 2000
                    >

                    Jennifer

                    > There are no official sub-categories of fantasy over here that I know of and I
                    > don't think there are any special labels on bookstore shelves, even in
                    > specialist 'speculative fiction' bookstores. In fact, you're lucky if they
                    > put all the fantasy books in the one place! It's just the authors labelling
                    > their own work - I guess to help readers work out if they want to buy it, or
                    > perhaps so they feel they don't need to compete with all the other authors who
                    > are writing straight fantasy (if there is such a thing).

                    The sort of sub-genre I meant was like "High Fantasy" which I've seen somewhere
                    and presumably means the sword&sorcery type story. If that's the case, I wonder
                    what "Low Fantasy" is?

                    Louise
                    louisecusack@...

                    > Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 07:56:20 -0400
                    > From: "Jennifer Kennedy" <jkennedy@...>
                    > Subject: Genres of Fantasy
                    >
                    > Louise, in the U.S. fantasy isn't even called "science fantasy." It's just
                    > fantasy. Period. There's science-fiction, of course, which is entirely
                    > separate. I suppose there are a few authors who take it upon themselves to
                    > subclassify the subject matter of their novels -- into "Darwinian," or
                    > "metaphysical," or what have you -- but there aren't any official
                    > subcategories. At least not that I'm aware of. The fantasy section of my
                    > local book stores don't have separate labels for "Darwinian" and
                    > "metaphysical," if that's what you mean. *grins*
                    >
                    > However, I think it's fascinating that a few Australian authors do that.
                    > But are there any official subcategories for fantasy in Australia, that you
                    > might even find labels for on bookshelves?
                    >
                    > -------------------------
                    > Jennifer Kennedy
                    > Monitor & Moderator: "Wheel of Time" eGroups Mailing List
                    >
                    > E-mail Contact: jkennedy@...
                    > ICQ # : 10968954
                    > Yahoo! Messenger ID: Tabheair
                    >
                  • sphinx
                    ... and I ... they ... labelling ... it, or ... authors who ... somewhere ... wonder ... This is just my personal observation, by High-Fantasy tends to deal
                    Message 9 of 14 , Oct 26, 2000
                      > > There are no official sub-categories of fantasy over here that I know of
                      and I
                      > > don't think there are any special labels on bookstore shelves, even in
                      > > specialist 'speculative fiction' bookstores. In fact, you're lucky if
                      they
                      > > put all the fantasy books in the one place! It's just the authors
                      labelling
                      > > their own work - I guess to help readers work out if they want to buy
                      it, or
                      > > perhaps so they feel they don't need to compete with all the other
                      authors who
                      > > are writing straight fantasy (if there is such a thing).
                      >
                      > The sort of sub-genre I meant was like "High Fantasy" which I've seen
                      somewhere
                      > and presumably means the sword&sorcery type story. If that's the case, I
                      wonder
                      > what "Low Fantasy" is?


                      This is just my personal observation, by "High-Fantasy" tends to deal with
                      larger-than-life characters who rather near the top of the food-chain in
                      terms of power,influence or what have you. They are large scale characters
                      who are quite capable of tackling issues on a grand scale. Example: "The
                      Silmarillion"

                      "Low Fantasy." Conversely tends to revolve around characters on the
                      recieving end of the predator-prey cycle. These characters usually deal
                      with problems on a much smaller scale. Example: "Thieves World."

                      "Epic Fantasy." Lies somewhere between the two, with low to medium-weight
                      characters end up influencing events on a vastly larger stage than their
                      place on the power/influence ladder would normally indicate. Example: The
                      Lord of The Rings.

                      Curt (who wonders if the advertizement in his signature is offensive to the
                      list.)
                      Read "Sparrow's Flight" at http://www.ruralnet.net/~sphinx
                    • K Peacock
                      Hi there... I ve been lurking here for a while and thought I d add my thoughts about this intriguing question. I took a course at university a few years back
                      Message 10 of 14 , Oct 27, 2000
                        Hi there...

                        I've been lurking here for a while and thought I'd add my thoughts about
                        this intriguing question. I took a course at university a few years back on
                        fantasy literature, and this is how my prof classified fantasy writing: (All
                        examples are children's lit, which was our focus in class...)

                        1. High Fantasy (Epic Fantasy) - High purpose, good vs. evil, well defined
                        landscapes and characters. Often culminates in battles for the common good.
                        ie/ LOTR, Hobbit, The Last Battle.
                        2. Low Fantasy (Enchanted Realism) - Gentler than epic... gentler magic,
                        less dramatic, a mix of the natural and supernatural. Concerned with
                        character development over the struggle of good vs. evil. Not inferior to
                        High Fantasy, just different. ie/ The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe, the
                        Little Prince, The Princess and the Goblin.
                        3. Light Fantasy - Like enchanted realism, but humerous or even absurd.
                        May involve black humor.
                        4. Talking Animal Tales - ie/ Winnie the Pooh, Redwall.
                        5. Science Fantasy - (Science Fiction as a sub-genre of "Fantasy")
                        6. Folklore (which includes some fairy tales, myths and legends, but not
                        all).
                        7. Fairy Tales
                        8. Myth - Involves explanations of life.
                        9. Legend - Tale that MAY be true... ie/ starts with "I have heard it said"
                        as opposed to "Once upon a time".

                        I know this prof had sources for all of this, but unfortunately, I didn't
                        copy them (we undergrads are so thorough ;)

                        Kim Peacock
                        kpeacock@...
                      • AJT1959@aol.com
                        Message 11 of 14 , Oct 29, 2000
                          <<
                          The sort of sub-genre I meant was like "High Fantasy" which I've seen
                          somewhere
                          and presumably means the sword&sorcery type story. If that's the case, I
                          wonder
                          what "Low Fantasy" is? >>

                          This, too, is the only sub-genre that I have seen. The "High Fantasy" as
                          opposed to regular fantasy. I have always assumed that high fantasy was a
                          direct outgrowth of the Tolkein-based books of sword, sorcery, elves, quests
                          and the like taking place in medieval like atmospheres. Books such as
                          Jordan's "Wheel of Time" series, Tad Williams "The Dragonbone Chair" and it's
                          sequels, all of David Eddings stuff, Terry Brook's "Shanarra" books, etc.
                          etc. etc.

                          The simple term of Fantasy then indicates to me that non-sword/sorcery books
                          such as Tad William's "Tailchaser's Song" or Neil Gaimen's and Terry
                          Pratchet's "Good Omens", books that are flights of fancy but
                          non-medieval/sword/sorcery based, cover the rest of the world of fantasy.

                          These are only terms that have come to mean something to me through
                          repetitive use and not because they actually mean anything. If words are
                          used often enough in ads and promotions, they tend to take on a life of their
                          own and connotations within ones own experiences. The two terms may be
                          technically faulty in reality but, to me, they have taken on descriptive
                          meaning to denote two types of storytelling.

                          Just my worthless two cents.

                          Barb
                        • Sidharam Drevekenin
                          ... Heya. Being new to this list I m now sure if what I say has been said before or gone over, but well - here it is. I have done quite some research in to
                          Message 12 of 14 , Oct 29, 2000
                            AJT1959@... wrote:

                            > <<
                            > The sort of sub-genre I meant was like "High Fantasy" which I've seen
                            > somewhere
                            > and presumably means the sword&sorcery type story. If that's the case, I
                            > wonder
                            > what "Low Fantasy" is? >>
                            >
                            > This, too, is the only sub-genre that I have seen. The "High Fantasy" as
                            > opposed to regular fantasy. I have always assumed that high fantasy was a
                            > direct outgrowth of the Tolkein-based books of sword, sorcery, elves, quests
                            > and the like taking place in medieval like atmospheres. Books such as
                            > Jordan's "Wheel of Time" series, Tad Williams "The Dragonbone Chair" and it's
                            > sequels, all of David Eddings stuff, Terry Brook's "Shanarra" books, etc.
                            > etc. etc.
                            >
                            > The simple term of Fantasy then indicates to me that non-sword/sorcery books
                            > such as Tad William's "Tailchaser's Song" or Neil Gaimen's and Terry
                            > Pratchet's "Good Omens", books that are flights of fancy but
                            > non-medieval/sword/sorcery based, cover the rest of the world of fantasy.
                            >
                            > These are only terms that have come to mean something to me through
                            > repetitive use and not because they actually mean anything. If words are
                            > used often enough in ads and promotions, they tend to take on a life of their
                            > own and connotations within ones own experiences. The two terms may be
                            > technically faulty in reality but, to me, they have taken on descriptive
                            > meaning to denote two types of storytelling.
                            >
                            > Just my worthless two cents.
                            >
                            > Barb

                            Heya.

                            Being new to this list I'm now sure if what I say has been said before or gone
                            over, but well - here it is.

                            I have done quite some research in to this area, consulting books like Sarah
                            LeFanu's "Writing Fantasy Fiction" which has a large section about the various
                            types of fantasy. And I've come up with some basic sub-genres of fantasy.

                            High Fantasy is not exactly what you mentioned. High Fantasy is a type of fantasy
                            where the characters take a secondary role to the plot, and the most developped
                            part of the characters is the idea behind them rather than the person
                            him/herself. There are of course exceptions and variations to this, but this is
                            the general idea.
                            In a polarized side is Legendary Fantasy. Here the characters and the world are
                            put in the spotlight and the story sort of flows from these features almost
                            unnoticeably.

                            These are the two main types, other than this there is Comic Fantasy, Dark
                            Fantasy and countless other genres.


                            Yours, Sidharam Drevekenin.
                          • Jennifer Kennedy
                            I must say...what an inconsiderate bitch (assuming the sender is female). She wasn t kidding when she said she has too much time on her hands. Pathetic. ...
                            Message 13 of 14 , Oct 29, 2000
                              I must say...what an inconsiderate bitch (assuming the sender is female).
                              She wasn't kidding when she said she has too much time on her hands.
                              Pathetic.


                              ----- Original Message -----
                              From: "cycocat3" <cycocat3@...>
                              To: <Fantasy_Books@egroups.com>
                              Sent: Wednesday, October 25, 2000 7:10 PM
                              Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] Re: Genres of Fantasy


                              >
                              >
                              >
                              > > If I see one more ad for this book, I'm never going to go near it! I
                              > > > understand you're excited about publishing, but I think you're
                              overdoing
                              > it.
                              > > >
                              > > > --Heidi
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > ACTUALLY, I'M NOT. I JUST HAVE A LOT OF TIME ON MY HANDS. IN ANY
                              CASE,
                              > PLEASE TAKE ME OFF YOUR LIST.
                              > AND, JUST FOR OLD TIME'S SAKE:
                              >
                              > AFTER THE WAR by J. L. Navarro (an e-book novel, 231 pp, 1MB) is now
                              > available for download from http://www.mightywords.com It is a
                              > surrealistic, unconventional novel in the tradition of Carlos Castaneda
                              and
                              > Rod Serling. The adventure takes place in a remote Mexican village
                              > inhabited by gunfighters and magicians and other strange and bizarre
                              > characters. It's a quick and easy read. Very entertaining for fans of
                              > fantastic fiction. Due to adult themes, this book may not be suitable for
                              > younger readers.
                              >
                              > THIS BOOK IS GUARANTEED TO BLOW YOUR
                              MIND!!!!!!!!!
                            • AJT1959@aol.com
                              In a message dated 10/30/2000 9:41:49 AM Central Standard Time, Fantasy_Books@egroups.com writes:
                              Message 14 of 14 , Oct 30, 2000
                                In a message dated 10/30/2000 9:41:49 AM Central Standard Time,
                                Fantasy_Books@egroups.com writes:

                                << High Fantasy is a type of fantasy
                                where the characters take a secondary role to the plot, and the most
                                developped
                                part of the characters is the idea behind them rather than the person
                                him/herself. >>


                                Hmm. This echos what someone else said earlier and it makes sense. Very
                                cool.
                                Now a question for the group, if no one minds.

                                What are your favorite:

                                High Fantasy books?
                                Comic Fantasy books?
                                Secret Vice book? (You know, that one you hate to admit you like cuz it's
                                been roundly trashed by the fantasy snobs but you read it in private anyway?)

                                I'm asking for purely selfish reasons, of course. I'm trying to ferret out
                                books I haven't read yet!

                                Barb
                              Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.