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Re: [Fantasy_Books] This month I have been mostly readin'...

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  • craig herbertson
    Jack Vance s Lyonesse Moonmen erb been doing a lot of writing for the Fourth Black book of Horror, Craig Craig Address: Alte Bahnhof Str 167, 44892 Bochum
    Message 1 of 18 , Oct 17, 2008
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      Jack Vance's Lyonesse
      Moonmen erb
      been doing a lot of writing for the Fourth Black book of Horror,

      Craig


      Craig

      Address: Alte Bahnhof Str 167, 44892 Bochum
      handi: 0177 474 5718 Fax: 0234 5414884craigherbertson.com           contact@...

      --- On Fri, 17/10/08, Leigh L. <leighlo@...> wrote:
      From: Leigh L. <leighlo@...>
      Subject: [Fantasy_Books] This month I have been mostly readin'...
      To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Friday, 17 October, 2008, 1:09 PM











      Just a few thoughts on recent reads to try to spur a bit of life back

      into the list and outweigh the spam messages :)



      The Lies of Locke Lamora - Scott Lynch

      Multiple recommendations on this list swayed me into reading this,

      and I found it... good, but not great. The past/present structure is

      interesting, the dialogue classy and the setting beautifully

      realised, but the plot drags almost unbearably for the first few

      chapters and doesn't really pick up until the halfway point when the

      Grey King is introduced. It's also a bit implausible just how much

      punishment Lynch's characters can take and keep on fightin'. Still,

      it did get me invested enough by the end to care about the sequel.



      Odd and the Frost Giants - Neil Gaiman

      Very brief novel (more of a short story) written for World Book Day.

      It's a lighthearted take on Norse legend with the feel of a parable

      or fable, though I'm not sure what exactly the message was. Beyond

      that there's nothing particularly bad about the execution, although

      the length doesn't allow for any real depth of plot or character, or

      for the unmistakable Gaiman magic to shine through.



      Infernal Devices - Philip Reeve

      Third in the sequence that began with Mortal Engines, and sadly not a

      patch on either that or the second book, Predator's Gold. Reeve seems

      to have lost interest in both the story and the readers to the point

      where he's either sidelining or actively demonising his previous

      characters, and the new ones just don't match up. It didn't feel like

      he enjoyed writing this at all, and the feeling can't help but rub

      off after a while. Still, maybe it's all a big setup and everything

      that felt wrong about this volume is neatly resolved in the final

      book...?



      Any counter-opinions? Anybody else read anything worth mentioning

      lately?



      - Leigh


























      Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Dale Jory
      My most recent reads have been Toll the Hounds by Steven Erikson which I did struggle to get through it, the tempo and style (very slow) was for me a lot
      Message 2 of 18 , Oct 25, 2008
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        My most recent reads have been "Toll the Hounds" by Steven Erikson which I did struggle to get through it, the tempo and style (very slow) was for me a lot different to the earlier books in the series. The ending was unexpected and did redeem the first two thirds. Toll the Hounds is the eighth book in the Malazan series and continues some of the story lines from earlier books but overall is the weakest in the series.

        The other book is "In Fury Born" by David Weber which I found easy to read and it has been a while since I have read a sci-fi story. The story is about a woman who has wanted to be a soldier from an early age and the battles that she is involved in until she is betrayed and then seeks vengeance.


        Dale

        --- On Sat, 10/18/08, craig herbertson <craigherbertson@...> wrote:

        > From: craig herbertson <craigherbertson@...>
        > Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] This month I have been mostly readin'...
        > To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Saturday, October 18, 2008, 2:09 AM
        > Jack Vance's Lyonesse
        > Moonmen erb
        > been doing a lot of writing for the Fourth Black book of
        > Horror,
        >
        > Craig
        >
        >
        > Craig
        >
        > Address: Alte Bahnhof Str 167, 44892 Bochum
        > handi: 0177 474 5718 Fax: 0234
        > 5414884craigherbertson.com
        > contact@...
        >
        > --- On Fri, 17/10/08, Leigh L. <leighlo@...>
        > wrote:
        > From: Leigh L. <leighlo@...>
        > Subject: [Fantasy_Books] This month I have been mostly
        > readin'...
        > To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
        > Date: Friday, 17 October, 2008, 1:09 PM
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Just a few thoughts on recent reads to try to
        > spur a bit of life back
        >
        > into the list and outweigh the spam messages :)
        >
        >
        >
        > The Lies of Locke Lamora - Scott Lynch
        >
        > Multiple recommendations on this list swayed me into
        > reading this,
        >
        > and I found it... good, but not great. The past/present
        > structure is
        >
        > interesting, the dialogue classy and the setting
        > beautifully
        >
        > realised, but the plot drags almost unbearably for the
        > first few
        >
        > chapters and doesn't really pick up until the halfway
        > point when the
        >
        > Grey King is introduced. It's also a bit implausible
        > just how much
        >
        > punishment Lynch's characters can take and keep on
        > fightin'. Still,
        >
        > it did get me invested enough by the end to care about the
        > sequel.
        >
        >
        >
        > Odd and the Frost Giants - Neil Gaiman
        >
        > Very brief novel (more of a short story) written for World
        > Book Day.
        >
        > It's a lighthearted take on Norse legend with the feel
        > of a parable
        >
        > or fable, though I'm not sure what exactly the message
        > was. Beyond
        >
        > that there's nothing particularly bad about the
        > execution, although
        >
        > the length doesn't allow for any real depth of plot or
        > character, or
        >
        > for the unmistakable Gaiman magic to shine through.
        >
        >
        >
        > Infernal Devices - Philip Reeve
        >
        > Third in the sequence that began with Mortal Engines, and
        > sadly not a
        >
        > patch on either that or the second book, Predator's
        > Gold. Reeve seems
        >
        > to have lost interest in both the story and the readers to
        > the point
        >
        > where he's either sidelining or actively demonising his
        > previous
        >
        > characters, and the new ones just don't match up. It
        > didn't feel like
        >
        > he enjoyed writing this at all, and the feeling can't
        > help but rub
        >
        > off after a while. Still, maybe it's all a big setup
        > and everything
        >
        > that felt wrong about this volume is neatly resolved in the
        > final
        >
        > book...?
        >
        >
        >
        > Any counter-opinions? Anybody else read anything worth
        > mentioning
        >
        > lately?
        >
        >
        >
        > - Leigh
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Send instant messages to your online friends
        > http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        > ------------------------------------
        >
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
      • Sharon
        Dale writes: The other book is In Fury Born by David Weber which I found easy to read and it has been a while since I have read a sci-fi story. The
        Message 3 of 18 , Oct 25, 2008
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          Dale writes:

          The other book is "In Fury Born" by David Weber which I found easy to read
          and it has been a while since I have read a sci-fi story. >>>

          The original book "Path of the Fury" is on my bookshelf, one of my well-loved re-reads. I have not read the expanded version, In Fury Born, although every time I get to the end of "Path" I wish he had ... or would ... write a sequel.

          Sharon in KY

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Dale Jory
          ... After I finished it I went looking for a sequel as well but nothing yet. There is certainty potential for a sequel but I did like the fact that the story
          Message 4 of 18 , Oct 26, 2008
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            --- On Sat, 10/25/08, Sharon <sportpony@...> wrote:

            > From: Sharon <sportpony@...>
            > Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] This month I have been mostly readin'...
            > To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
            > Date: Saturday, October 25, 2008, 11:09 PM
            > Dale writes:
            >
            > The other book is "In Fury Born" by David Weber
            > which I found easy to read
            > and it has been a while since I have read a sci-fi story.
            > >>>
            >
            > The original book "Path of the Fury" is on my
            > bookshelf, one of my well-loved re-reads. I have not read
            > the expanded version, In Fury Born, although every time I
            > get to the end of "Path" I wish he had ... or
            > would ... write a sequel.
            >
            > Sharon in KY
            >

            After I finished it I went looking for a sequel as well but nothing yet. There is certainty potential for a sequel but I did like the fact that the story could be read as a standalone. I am going to try and track down a copy of "Path of the Fury" just to see what had been changed or added to.

            Dale
          • Sharon
            am going to try and track down a copy of Path of the Fury just to see what had been changed or added to. Dale I haven t read the expanded version
            Message 5 of 18 , Oct 27, 2008
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              <<> am going to try and track down a copy of "Path of the Fury" just to see what had been changed or added to. Dale >>>

              I haven't read the "expanded" version so not sure where that started or if there was more detail in later sections but "Path" starts with the raid on the family homestead which killed all of her family and "introduced" her to the Fury.

              Sharon in KY



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Leigh L.
              ... Really? Hmm, that s a shame. I only recently realised how far behind I ve Fallen (ahaha) with the Malazan books, and had hoped to address that soon. I read
              Message 6 of 18 , Oct 27, 2008
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                > My most recent reads have been "Toll the Hounds" by Steven Erikson
                > which I did struggle to get through it, the tempo and style (very
                > slow) was for me a lot different to the earlier books in the
                > series. The ending was unexpected and did redeem the first two
                > thirds. Toll the Hounds is the eighth book in the Malazan series
                > and continues some of the story lines from earlier books but
                > overall is the weakest in the series.

                Really? Hmm, that's a shame. I only recently realised how far behind
                I've Fallen (ahaha) with the Malazan books, and had hoped to address
                that soon. I read Midnight Tides earlier in the year, and while it
                didn't really measure up to previous books, I've made enough of an
                investment in the series by now that it'll take more than one
                slightly shaky effort to scare me off - from what I've heard things
                pick up again with The Bonehunters and Reaper's Gale, but hearing
                that Toll the Hounds is the weakest yet doesn't bode well this close
                to the end of the series.

                Ah well, it'll have to wait anyway as I've just started catching up
                on China Mieville with The Scar, and that's not exactly a compact
                little volume either...

                - Leigh
              • craig herbertson
                rereading a lot of Jack Vance - Gray Prince at the moment Craig Address: Alte Bahnhof Str 167, 44892 Bochum handi: 0177 474 5718 Fax: 0234
                Message 7 of 18 , Oct 27, 2008
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                  rereading a lot of Jack Vance - Gray Prince at the moment


                  Craig

                  Address: Alte Bahnhof Str 167, 44892 Bochum
                  handi: 0177 474 5718 Fax: 0234 5414884craigherbertson.com           contact@...

                  --- On Mon, 27/10/08, Leigh L. <leighlo@...> wrote:
                  From: Leigh L. <leighlo@...>
                  Subject: [Fantasy_Books] Re: This month I have been mostly readin'...
                  To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Monday, 27 October, 2008, 2:52 PM











                  > My most recent reads have been "Toll the Hounds" by Steven Erikson

                  > which I did struggle to get through it, the tempo and style (very

                  > slow) was for me a lot different to the earlier books in the

                  > series. The ending was unexpected and did redeem the first two

                  > thirds. Toll the Hounds is the eighth book in the Malazan series

                  > and continues some of the story lines from earlier books but

                  > overall is the weakest in the series.



                  Really? Hmm, that's a shame. I only recently realised how far behind

                  I've Fallen (ahaha) with the Malazan books, and had hoped to address

                  that soon. I read Midnight Tides earlier in the year, and while it

                  didn't really measure up to previous books, I've made enough of an

                  investment in the series by now that it'll take more than one

                  slightly shaky effort to scare me off - from what I've heard things

                  pick up again with The Bonehunters and Reaper's Gale, but hearing

                  that Toll the Hounds is the weakest yet doesn't bode well this close

                  to the end of the series.



                  Ah well, it'll have to wait anyway as I've just started catching up

                  on China Mieville with The Scar, and that's not exactly a compact

                  little volume either...



                  - Leigh





























                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • William Marnoch
                  ... I d disagree that Toll The Hounds is the weakest in the series, although I wouldn t say it was the best either. It does have a similar structure to House
                  Message 8 of 18 , Oct 27, 2008
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                    On 27 Oct 2008 at 14:52, Leigh L. wrote:

                    >
                    > > My most recent reads have been "Toll the Hounds" by Steven Erikson
                    > > which I did struggle to get through it, the tempo and style (very
                    > > slow) was for me a lot different to the earlier books in the
                    > > series. The ending was unexpected and did redeem the first two
                    > > thirds. Toll the Hounds is the eighth book in the Malazan series
                    > > and continues some of the story lines from earlier books but
                    > > overall is the weakest in the series.
                    >
                    > Really? Hmm, that's a shame. I only recently realised how far behind
                    > I've Fallen (ahaha) with the Malazan books, and had hoped to address
                    > that soon. I read Midnight Tides earlier in the year, and while it
                    > didn't really measure up to previous books, I've made enough of an
                    > investment in the series by now that it'll take more than one
                    > slightly shaky effort to scare me off - from what I've heard things
                    > pick up again with The Bonehunters and Reaper's Gale, but hearing
                    > that Toll the Hounds is the weakest yet doesn't bode well this close
                    > to the end of the series.
                    >
                    > Ah well, it'll have to wait anyway as I've just started catching up
                    > on China Mieville with The Scar, and that's not exactly a compact
                    > little volume either...
                    >
                    > - Leigh

                    I'd disagree that Toll The Hounds is the weakest in the series, although I wouldn't say it
                    was the best either. It does have a similar structure to House of Chains, The
                    Bonehunters and Reaper's Gale in that there's a lot of build-up before a couple of
                    hundred pages of action at the end. I'd probably rate it above Bonehunters and Reaper's
                    Gale since I felt the conclusion in TTH was more satisfying than in the previous two
                    books where I felt some elements of the ending were a bit flawed. Overall I did like Toll
                    The Hounds, although I still have to question whether it really needed to be 900+ pages
                    long.



                    --
                    William Marnoch
                    william@...
                    http://www.voidhawk.com/ - Film and Book Reviews
                  • Phoebe Matthews
                    This week I finished Lilith Saintcrow s Night Shift first book in her new Jill Kismit series, and now I m reading the second, Hunter s Prayer. I liked the
                    Message 9 of 18 , Nov 10, 2008
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                      This week I finished Lilith Saintcrow's "Night Shift" first book in her new Jill Kismit series,
                      and now I'm reading the second, "Hunter's Prayer." I liked the first one, but I think the
                      second is better as the characters become more alive. Pace is always fast. (Mudflat series
                      - http://phoebematthews.com)
                      --- In Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com, "Leigh L." <leighlo@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Just a few thoughts on recent reads to try to spur a bit of life back
                      > into the list and outweigh the spam messages :)
                      >
                      > The Lies of Locke Lamora - Scott Lynch
                      > Multiple recommendations on this list swayed me into reading this,
                      > and I found it... good, but not great. The past/present structure is
                      > interesting, the dialogue classy and the setting beautifully
                      > realised, but the plot drags almost unbearably for the first few
                      > chapters and doesn't really pick up until the halfway point when the
                      > Grey King is introduced. It's also a bit implausible just how much
                      > punishment Lynch's characters can take and keep on fightin'. Still,
                      > it did get me invested enough by the end to care about the sequel.
                      >
                      > Odd and the Frost Giants - Neil Gaiman
                      > Very brief novel (more of a short story) written for World Book Day.
                      > It's a lighthearted take on Norse legend with the feel of a parable
                      > or fable, though I'm not sure what exactly the message was. Beyond
                      > that there's nothing particularly bad about the execution, although
                      > the length doesn't allow for any real depth of plot or character, or
                      > for the unmistakable Gaiman magic to shine through.
                      >
                      > Infernal Devices - Philip Reeve
                      > Third in the sequence that began with Mortal Engines, and sadly not a
                      > patch on either that or the second book, Predator's Gold. Reeve seems
                      > to have lost interest in both the story and the readers to the point
                      > where he's either sidelining or actively demonising his previous
                      > characters, and the new ones just don't match up. It didn't feel like
                      > he enjoyed writing this at all, and the feeling can't help but rub
                      > off after a while. Still, maybe it's all a big setup and everything
                      > that felt wrong about this volume is neatly resolved in the final
                      > book...?
                      >
                      > Any counter-opinions? Anybody else read anything worth mentioning
                      > lately?
                      >
                      > - Leigh
                      >
                    • Sharon
                      Message 10 of 18 , Nov 10, 2008
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                        << Anybody else read anything worth mentioning
                        > lately? - Leigh >>>


                        Since the third of the Bujold "Sharing Knife" I've been in a real reading slump. However I picked up the newest Mercedes Lackey book "Foundation" ... apparantly the first of a new "Companions" series ... and sat up until waaay past my usual bedtime so I could finish it.

                        I liked her other series in this world, I mean let's face it, a horse person is going to like telepathic horses with human level intelligence, though I think this may be my favorite of any of them so far ...

                        Sharon in KY



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • kara fitzpatrick
                        Hi, I was just wondering who the author of Path of Fury is so that I can read his/her books. Thanks ________________________________ From: Sharon
                        Message 11 of 18 , Dec 11, 2008
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                          Hi, I was just wondering who the author of "Path of Fury" is so that I can read his/her books. Thanks




                          ________________________________
                          From: Sharon <sportpony@...>
                          To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
                          Sent: Monday, October 27, 2008 3:57:25 AM
                          Subject: Re: [Fantasy_Books] This month I have been mostly readin'...


                          <<> am going to try and track down a copy of "Path of the Fury" just to see what had been changed or added to. Dale >>>

                          I haven't read the "expanded" version so not sure where that started or if there was more detail in later sections but "Path" starts with the raid on the family homestead which killed all of her family and "introduced" her to the Fury.

                          Sharon in KY

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




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                        • Sharon
                          The author of Path of the Fury is David Weber. He s a very prolific author and I ve liked a lot of his books ... have a lot of them on my personal
                          Message 12 of 18 , Dec 11, 2008
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                            The author of "Path of the Fury" is David Weber. He's a very prolific author and I've liked a lot of his books ... have a lot of them on my personal bookshelves that I enjoy re-reading.

                            His "Honor Harrington" series is probably his best known series. I have all of the early Harrington books ... they are great and read something like "Path". I also particularly liked "The Apocolypse Troll", a stand alone and the "Mutineer's Moon" trilogy.

                            He does have a strong tendency to get carried away with political involvement, especially noticeable in the last few years and while I did read the last two of the Harrington books, just to more or less finish out the "story" ... I don't own them.

                            Sharon in KY

                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • William C. Garthright
                            ... I agree, Sharon. I enjoyed David Weber s first two Honor Harrington books, though they followed the now-standard pattern of C. S. Forester s Horatio
                            Message 13 of 18 , Dec 11, 2008
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                              > His "Honor Harrington" series is probably his best known series. I have all of the early Harrington books ...
                              >
                              > He does have a strong tendency to get carried away with political involvement, especially noticeable in the last few years


                              I agree, Sharon. I enjoyed David Weber's first two Honor Harrington
                              books, though they followed the now-standard pattern of C. S. Forester's
                              Horatio Hornblower (except for being set in space), always ending with
                              the usual climactic battle against overwhelming odds. But they were
                              enjoyable, if you didn't take them too seriously.

                              As the series went on, though, they got increasingly talky, and
                              heavy-handed into politics, though I kept reading for awhile. Later, he
                              started writing similar books, set in the same universe, but with
                              different characters. "The Shadow of Saganimi" was pretty good, I
                              thought, though it followed the standard space navy formula exactly. But
                              I couldn't believe how bad "Crown of Slaves" was (though it was
                              co-authored by Eric Flint, who's one of my favorite authors). Too much
                              talk, and ridiculous characters!

                              I've enjoyed other David Weber books, including his collaborations with
                              Steve White ("Insurrection," "Crusade," etc.), which are more space navy
                              warfare books (again, they're all alike, but they're exciting enough)
                              and others with Eric Flint in Flint's "1632" series. I've also got his
                              1995 fantasy, "Oath of Swords," but I must admit that I don't really
                              remember it.

                              Bill

                              --
                              There is no society in human history that ever suffered because its
                              people became too reasonable. - Sam Harris
                            • Sharon
                              Message 14 of 18 , Dec 12, 2008
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                                <<<But I couldn't believe how bad "Crown of Slaves" was (though it was
                                co-authored by Eric Flint, who's one of my favorite authors). Too much
                                talk, and ridiculous characters! Bill >>>>

                                Eric Flint is one of my favorite authors too ... I have re-read "Mother of Demons" I don't know how many times and same for the first two books in the 1832 series. The first book ... by Eric Flint only, is just a great fun read. The second, co-authored with David Weber, gets a lot more involved with history and politics ... you can sure see the Weber influence. After that, for me, unfortunately, it was all downhill. The last two I picked up at the library in the hopes that it might improve again I don't think I even finished. Too many people, too much history, too much politics ... and while I can handle some of that if the characters are really great, since I insist on character-driven books for the most part ... a couple of the co-authors he's using with this series don't seem to be able to do characters well.

                                Oh, well ...

                                Sharon



                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • William C. Garthright
                                ... Yes, Sharon, same here. I ve re-read Mother of Demons many times. And the 1632 series as well. At his best, Eric Flint writes entertaining stories with
                                Message 15 of 18 , Dec 13, 2008
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                                  > Eric Flint is one of my favorite authors too ... I have re-read "Mother of Demons" I don't know how many times and same for the first two books in the 1632 series.


                                  Yes, Sharon, same here. I've re-read "Mother of Demons" many times. And
                                  the "1632" series as well. At his best, Eric Flint writes entertaining
                                  stories with wonderful characters. His fiction is always optimistic, and
                                  his characters aren't supermen, but they're very capable and
                                  unrealistically decent. That doesn't bother me, though. I guess I'm just
                                  a sucker for that kind of thing.

                                  However, Flint has become VERY prolific. He seems to have any number of
                                  books he's writing at the same time, often with various co-authors. And
                                  unfortunately, the quality is getting pretty uneven. I think he needs to
                                  slow down.

                                  If you haven't read them, you might want to try his Rivers of War
                                  series: "1812: The Rivers of War" and "1824: The Arkansas War." They are
                                  alternate history which start from a single small event. In this
                                  history, unlike our own, the young Sam Houston escapes serious injury in
                                  the War of 1812, and that leads to many eventual consequences, such as
                                  the Trail of Tears migration of the Cherokee being taken voluntarily,
                                  along with free blacks, to form their own homeland in Arkansas and
                                  Oklahoma. I think it's fascinating.

                                  I also like "Rats, Bats, and Vats" (2000) and the sequel, "The Rats, the
                                  Bats, and the Ugly" (2004), both with Dave Freer. I actually like the
                                  sequel the best, but they're both hilarious and exciting. (The romance
                                  between the man, Fitzhugh, and his chocolate-craving rat, Ariel, is
                                  great!) And I enjoyed "The Shadow of the Lion" (2002) and its sequels,
                                  written with Mercedes Lackey and Dave Freer. Those are historical
                                  fantasies, set in a 16th Century Venice with magic and gods.

                                  I like Flint enough that I've been buying every book he writes, but I've
                                  been disappointed often enough, too (especially lately). I just think
                                  he's got too much on his plate these days.

                                  Bill

                                  PS. Another thing I like about Eric Flint is his work with the Baen Free
                                  Library (http://www.baen.com/library/defaultTitles.htm). He's got a
                                  large number of his own books there, free to download, including most of
                                  those mentioned above. I want to own the books I like, but it's sure
                                  nice to be able to try them first!

                                  --
                                  A common mistake people make when trying to design something completely
                                  foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools. - Douglas
                                  Adams
                                • Sharon
                                  Message 16 of 18 , Dec 14, 2008
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                                    <<<At his best, Eric Flint writes entertaining stories with wonderful characters. His fiction is always optimistic, and
                                    his characters aren't supermen, but they're very capable and unrealistically decent. That doesn't bother me, though. I guess I'm just a sucker for that kind of thing.>>>

                                    I read for entertainment and that is what I enjoy reading ... good story with great characters and DECENT characters. My other 'favorite' genre is mystery and I've really gotten disgusted with all of the "dysfunctional" characters there ... I mean, a serial killer cop as a HERO? Sorry ... doesn't work for me.


                                    <<<However, Flint has become VERY prolific. He seems to have any number of books he's writing at the same time, often with various co-authors. And unfortunately, the quality is getting pretty uneven. I think he needs to slow down. >>>

                                    That seems to have happened with several of the very popular authors ... other than Flint, David Weber and Anne McCaffrey come to mind. And it is often these co-authored books that end up losing me as a "buy it as soon as it comes out whether I've read it or not" customer.

                                    I'm not sure just why it happens (money maybe?) but other authors, that I like just as well, seem to have managed to avoid that. I sometimes wish they would write faster, but seems like for most people one, possibly two, books per year seems to be the practical limit.

                                    I'll see what else the library may have by Flint and try a couple of the other series if they have them.

                                    Sharon


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                                  • William C. Garthright
                                    ... Me, neither. I like mysteries, but I HAVE to like the characters - I mean, really like them. Most mysteries don t do much for me. I prefer the
                                    Message 17 of 18 , Dec 14, 2008
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                                      > My other 'favorite' genre is mystery and I've really gotten disgusted with all of the "dysfunctional" characters there ... I mean, a serial killer cop as a HERO? Sorry ... doesn't work for me.
                                      >


                                      Me, neither. I like mysteries, but I HAVE to like the characters - I
                                      mean, really like them. Most mysteries don't do much for me. I prefer
                                      the old-fashioned kind of British mysteries like Agatha Christie and
                                      Dorothy Sayers. Right now, my favorite author is Reginald Hill. I've
                                      gotten hooked on his Dalziel and Pascoe series.

                                      Oddly enough, though, I don't think I would have liked them much if I
                                      hadn't seen the first one, "A Clubbable Woman," on TV. That gave me a
                                      clear idea of the characters, which I don't think the book alone would
                                      have done. As I continued to read the series, though, I got to know the
                                      characters better and better (and he kept adding characters here and
                                      there, as the series continued).

                                      I like Sharyn McCrumb's Appalachian mysteries, too, though I don't
                                      usually like fantasy elements (ghosts, etc.) in mysteries. I haven't
                                      read her most recent books, though.

                                      So, Sharon, what mystery authors do you like? Our tastes seem to be
                                      similar, and I don't read enough mysteries to be very familiar with them.


                                      > I sometimes wish they would write faster, but seems like for most people one, possibly two, books per year seems to be the practical limit.
                                      >


                                      And then, some authors don't write nearly fast enough. Connie Willis,
                                      for example, is one of my very favorite authors, but I sure wish she'd
                                      write more!

                                      Heh! I guess I'm never satisfied, huh?

                                      Bill

                                      --
                                      Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to
                                      continue that counts. - Winston Churchill
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