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Re: Vampire romance novels?

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  • Kelley
    I tried to do something different with my latest work set in sixth century Scotland. My heroine is a vampire, but she is a Lamia, a Greek vampire, which is
    Message 1 of 5 , May 13, 2008
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      I tried to do something different with my latest work set in sixth
      century Scotland. My heroine is a vampire, but she is a Lamia, a
      Greek vampire, which is half-serpent and half-woman. Instead of using
      the typical Dracula style vampire, I created her and made it so she
      was cursed by her enemies and turned into this creature. I like to
      break the rules and not write what everyone is writing. There can be
      a downside to this though, because it seems people want to read all
      the same vampire stories.

      Kelley
      http://www.kelleyheckart.com
      http://www.myspace.com/phantomqueen3


      --- In Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com, Steven Middaugh <karellan@...>
      wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Vampires and werewolves and other supernatural creatures were
      always fantasy.  Same with fairies and elves and orcs and dragons. 
      They were often part of the fairy tales as well, like Beauty and The
      Beast for example.  So, it all depends on how the stories were
      constructed with the intention of being far more darker in the plots
      or conveying the attraction for danger in any romantic
      entanglements.  So it doesn't matter whether it's horror or fantasy. 
      They're both sides of the same coin.
      >
      > http://scienceblogs .com/pharyngula/ 2008/05/mass_ market_genre_
      surprise. php
      >
      > I came across this blog posting this morning, and I thought it was
      kind
      > of funny. The vampire romance fad baffles me, too, though I did
      enjoy
      > the early Laurell K. Hamilton books. They were just so over-the-top
      that
      > they became fun. Well, I *thought* they were over-the-top, until I
      read
      > the later ones. And I can't even imagine what the copycats must be
      like!
      >
      > Bill
      >
      > --
      > We can only wonder what a Manhattan Project aimed at alternative
      energy
      > might have accomplished by now, had it been started 15 years ago.
      What
      > we have had in lieu of vision, leadership, and backbone is a series
      of
      > easy paths taken. - Jeremy Grantham
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • jamie coady
      i hate the normal vampire stories. i hate horror fantasy or not i don t mind books with a bit of scare in them like some of lord of the rings. i like a fantasy
      Message 2 of 5 , May 13, 2008
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        i hate the normal vampire stories. i hate horror fantasy or not i don't mind books with a bit of scare in them like some of lord of the rings. i like a fantasy book that keeps you on the edge of your seat. what i also like is for it to be a made up world. i also like a lot of magic.

        jamie

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Kelley
        To: Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, May 13, 2008 4:20 PM
        Subject: [Fantasy_Books] Re: Vampire romance novels?


        I tried to do something different with my latest work set in sixth
        century Scotland. My heroine is a vampire, but she is a Lamia, a
        Greek vampire, which is half-serpent and half-woman. Instead of using
        the typical Dracula style vampire, I created her and made it so she
        was cursed by her enemies and turned into this creature. I like to
        break the rules and not write what everyone is writing. There can be
        a downside to this though, because it seems people want to read all
        the same vampire stories.

        Kelley
        http://www.kelleyheckart.com
        http://www.myspace.com/phantomqueen3

        --- In Fantasy_Books@yahoogroups.com, Steven Middaugh <karellan@...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Vampires and werewolves and other supernatural creatures were
        always fantasy. Same with fairies and elves and orcs and dragons.
        They were often part of the fairy tales as well, like Beauty and The
        Beast for example. So, it all depends on how the stories were
        constructed with the intention of being far more darker in the plots
        or conveying the attraction for danger in any romantic
        entanglements. So it doesn't matter whether it's horror or fantasy.
        They're both sides of the same coin.
        >
        > http://scienceblogs .com/pharyngula/ 2008/05/mass_ market_genre_
        surprise. php
        >
        > I came across this blog posting this morning, and I thought it was
        kind
        > of funny. The vampire romance fad baffles me, too, though I did
        enjoy
        > the early Laurell K. Hamilton books. They were just so over-the-top
        that
        > they became fun. Well, I *thought* they were over-the-top, until I
        read
        > the later ones. And I can't even imagine what the copycats must be
        like!
        >
        > Bill
        >
        > --
        > We can only wonder what a Manhattan Project aimed at alternative
        energy
        > might have accomplished by now, had it been started 15 years ago.
        What
        > we have had in lieu of vision, leadership, and backbone is a series
        of
        > easy paths taken. - Jeremy Grantham
        >
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >






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