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Re: The BBC: Saint who has lived without food, water for 70 yrs

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  • lurkernomore20002000
    ... lady saints who did not take food for decades ... the church ... Edg dismissed the story outright as an impossibility or a fraud. Turq, if I followed his
    Message 1 of 15 , May 2, 2010
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      --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "anatol_zinc" <anatol_zinc@...> wrote:
      >
      > don't know if this guy is genuine
      > but believe it is possible
      >
      > in Autobiography of a Yogi, Paramahansa Yogananda writes about two lady saints who did not take food for decades
      > one was a Catholic nun whom I assume was investigated and watched by the church
      >
      > but most of all I believe Yogananda
      >
      > and more recently, Mooji of www.mooji.org
      > said that he knows personally a whole family,
      > except for the youngest one, in South Brazil
      > who are breatherians
      >
      > science cannot prove that something like this is not possible,
      > therefore, anyone who wishes to relive that it is possible
      > is basically saying this is my hypothesis
      > and it remains to be proven one way or the other 
      Edg dismissed the story outright as an impossibility or a fraud.  Turq, if I followed his line of reasoning, seemed to dismiss it as well.  I mention those two as they were about the only people who commented on the story.  I also read the account of Yogananda's.  I guess you either believe that there are such things as miracles, (or apparant miracles, as if they do exist, there must be other, uncovered laws which apply to them), or you don't.  I don't immediately presume this story is a fraud.   But, I need to see subtantiation. 

       
      Just for fun, for those who don't buy into occurances that violate the laws of physics, are the accounts of objects like cardboard getting lodged in steel, during a tornado, also fraud.  I am not asking  cynically.  I really don't know.  I suppose I could check it out online.


      > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Archer" rick@ wrote:
      > >
      > > The BBC's 2-minute video-report on an Indian saint who has lived with no
      > > food, no water, for over 70 years:
      > >
      > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8652837.stm
      > >
      >

    • TurquoiseB
      ... Lurk, I m chiming in because I like you, and you did, in fact, fail to follow my line of reasoning. I said nothing whatsoever about this story. My
      Message 2 of 15 , May 3, 2010
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        --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "lurkernomore20002000" <steve.sundur@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "anatol_zinc" <anatol_zinc@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > don't know if this guy is genuine
        > > but believe it is possible
        >
        > > in Autobiography of a Yogi, Paramahansa Yogananda writes about
        > > two lady saints who did not take food for decades one was a
        > > Catholic nun whom I assume was investigated and watched by
        > > the church
        > >
        > > but most of all I believe Yogananda
        > >
        > > and more recently, Mooji of www.mooji.org
        > > said that he knows personally a whole family,
        > > except for the youngest one, in South Brazil
        > > who are breatherians
        > >
        > > science cannot prove that something like this is not possible,
        > > therefore, anyone who wishes to relive that it is possible
        > > is basically saying this is my hypothesis
        > > and it remains to be proven one way or the other
        >
        > Edg dismissed the story outright as an impossibility or a fraud.
        > Turq, if I followed his line of reasoning, seemed to dismiss it
        > as well.

        Lurk, I'm chiming in because I like you, and you did, in
        fact, fail to follow my "line of reasoning."

        I said nothing whatsoever about this story. My comments
        were solely about the mindset of people who either believe
        the story upon hearing it, or disbelieve it upon hearing it.
        I care *nothing* about "miracle stories" in general, or
        about this one in particular. I have had it up to here
        with miracles in my life with no discernible benefit as
        a result. But I *am* curious as to the *ways that spiritual
        seekers think*.

        Above you see one example of this "how." Anatol, as sweet
        and as nice a guy as he probably is, "believes Yogananda,"
        a man he never met. Not a heckuva lot of discrimination
        goin' on there.

        Edg, at the other pole, believes the story is a fraud, and
        a knowing one, while having no more "hands on" experience
        with the miracle-maker in question than Anatol. Not a
        heckuva lot of discrimination there, either.

        My only point in chiming in on this thread in the first
        place was to suggest that when it comes to "siddhi stories"
        or "miracle stories," there is almost no discrimination
        goin' on, period.

        People use "miracle stories" as a way of *reinforcing
        what they already believe*. They don't WANT to analyze
        or "prove"/"disprove" them scientifically. They want
        only to keep believing the things they believe today.
      • Duveyoung
        Lurk -- you did not read my words correctly. ... means I want to see more time spent no peeing etc.....not that the proof so far is not valid. And, as we know,
        Message 3 of 15 , May 3, 2010
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          Lurk -- you did not read my words correctly.

          --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, Duveyoung <no_reply@...> wrote:
          >
          > Lurk,
          >
          > The guy has not been observed long enough to declare a miracle. This means I want to see more time spent no peeing etc.....not that the proof so far is not valid. And, as we know, bribery is the life blood of India. The guy could be merely fasting and secretly pissing in a wad of tissue which he hands off to a friend. "Could" is the operative word -- science tries to eliminate all these other explanations, but the video doesn't seem to want to bring us into the experiment enough to show us why they are so certain that this guy is not a scammer. They get all the drugs they want in prison, right -- so how hard would it be to fool a few doctors and nurses if the guy has an accomplice on staff? And bribery is rampent in India -- not that I know this by personal experience, but who here has not read this a million times? They seem sincere, but so does Girish probably.
          >
          > I saw this article yesterday about an American guy, decades ago, that went around showing folks how he could be run completely through by a sword. Turns out he had taken a year and built a shaft thought his body like one has through an earlobe for an earring -- talk about your dedicated scammers! This one example serves us all as a warning that extraordinary acts often are hidden in order to pull a ruse. That's once being fooled -- this miracle man is being examined and I'm over here waiting for any proof that the experiment is really controlled by the doctors such that tomfoolery is out of the question.
          >
          > Same deal with this yogi -- even two dollars is big time motivation in India. Get international acclaim, no matter how temporary, and the guy's going on a speaking tour for the rest of his life as "the saint." In today's global media, all it takes is one 15 minute spotlight, and you've got a book deal, an ashram and a thug who's come to the fore to help you promulgate the scam. India is, what?, 80% true believers in yogic powers, right? They may not have much money, but nickels and dimes in the collection plates can add up fast.
          >
          > Western science is not going to have a second thought about this. Note that I didn't say "Edg is not going to give this a second thought." Indeed, if more info comes out, I'll examine it. I do believe in siddhis -- just that they're way to important to not give them the highest standards to uphold before I'll bend a knee to a sacred accomplishment.

          Google "levitation," and you'll see MANY HOLY PEOPLE doing so -- yet obviously most are merely hucksters taking pennies from the poor. Same deal with any other claim. What don't we get about the extreme ploys poverty breeds in the 3rd world? Hell, look at Sunday Faith Healers in America plying their trade.

          And who here hasn't been taken to the cleaners by the TMO? Failed promises, adulterous leaders, no hovering, black lists, bureaucratic potentates, pundit slaves, government money scams, blatantly stupid expenditures, criminal actions like money laundering by the bucket load, classis, cronyism, hugger, and even MURDER ON THE CAMPUS....seldom has a cult tested its true believers so harshly -- when they come out with the 55 gallon Kool Aid solution, who will be surprised?

          Edg

          > Edg
          >
          > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "lurkernomore20002000" steve.sundur@ wrote:
          > >
          > > I saw this article earlier this week, and didn't get a chance to comment on it. Recently Edg commented that had Fred Lenz really been able to levitate that you would have gobs of people and press, and even the govenrment all over it.
          > >
          > > And I said that sometimes the things you expect the press and culture to jumb on, they don't. To me this is an example of this. If this is true, is this not as remarkable a feat as leviatation? I saw this story on a major media web site, on the front page, Tuesday or Wednesday. Is this getting more than a passing interest from the press, and culture. Doesn't seem like it. And then, why not?
          > >
          > > --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, "Rick Archer" <rick@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > The BBC's 2-minute video-report on an Indian saint who has lived with no
          > > > food, no water, for over 70 years:
          > > >
          > > > http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/8652837.stm
          > > >
          > >
          >

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