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Re: The problem

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  • Alan
    ... What issue are you talking about as far as the debate with Push is concerned? And what arguments were presented that you found satisfactory? Alan
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 29, 2013
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      --- In Fabric-of-Reality@yahoogroups.com, "hibbsa" <hibbsa@...> wrote:

      > The principles produced by the philosophy are immune to all forms forms
      > of criticism involving data, evidence, real-world-events contradiction,
      > and so on. The only acceptible criticism is heavily constrained and
      > entirely in the hands of the philosophy itself, and there are a host of
      > rules and priorities that aren't made explicit to people seeking to make
      > a criticism, which often completely neutralize their whole category of
      > criticism in the eyes of the adherents of the philosopy, effectively
      > making the criticism a pointless pursuit.
      >
      > For example, look at the debate with Steve Push over in BoI. To all
      > intents and purposes I think he won that debate on the terms he was led
      > to believe could result in a genuine criticism being landed, should he
      > prevail. But that wasn't the case. Deutsch, Temple, Forrester and others
      > engaged Push on his chosen terms, but in reality never had any intention
      > whatsoever of conceding a major criticism of their philosophy.
      >
      > The reason was that, if they lost on the implicitly agreed terms, they
      > could simply back things off to making ever more impractical demands for
      > 'source' material such as specific details of the experiments to be
      > provided by Push. Then if that didn't work, arguments could follow about
      > scientism.
      >
      > Then if that didn't work arguments could follow that ultimately asked
      > whether he had a better over all explanation of epistemology and
      > science. And if he didn't, then by the rules of the philosophy, the
      > philosophy would stand.
      >
      > That's the reality on the ground of how the philosophy works. Criticism
      > is effectively massively protected against in explicit ways that aren't
      > made clear. No effort is made to direct criticism to key points that
      > need to be broken. It just doesn't happen.
      >
      > Besides everything else, there's an issue of integrity. Is it honest,
      > intellectually, to tell someone you are open to criticism, and then
      > engage with them in the criticism they want to make, implicitly
      > indicating that if they can establisht their criticism you will accept
      > it in good faith, when actually that is not true.

      What issue are you talking about as far as the debate with Push is concerned? And what arguments were presented that you found satisfactory?

      Alan
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