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Re: The 'physicality' of digital

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  • mjhzxc
    ... that ... translation ... result ... the release ... many ... various ways, ... wavelengths ... find edges, ... possible ... discriminate. Thank you ever so
    Message 1 of 42 , Aug 31, 2006
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      --- In Fabric-of-Reality@yahoogroups.com, Alan Forrester
      <alan_forrester2@...> wrote:

      > > I am aware that 'non-physical' informational constructs must be
      > > processed and/or represented in a physical way. I am also aware
      that
      > > the 'moving' physical parts of a digital information processing
      > > device, such as a classical computer, are electrons.
      > >
      > > I am having trouble however grappling with the actual
      > > mechanics, 'physicality' involved within image manipulation.
      > >
      > > 1. During digital image manipulation for example, does the
      translation
      > > of an area of an image, the result of a mathematical formula,
      result
      > > in the physical manipulation of the electron.
      >
      > Photons hit sensors. When a photon hits such a sensor it causes
      the release
      > of electrons and the resulting signal is
      >
      > (1) amplified: each electron goes through a circuit that produces
      many
      > electrons for each one that goes in)
      >
      > (2) processed: the amplified signals are then manipulated in
      various ways,
      > e.g. - signals that contain information about light levels and
      wavelengths
      > at sensors that are close together might be compared to try to
      find edges,
      > they contain information about those things because the sensors are
      > designed to respond in different ways to different light levels and
      > wavelengths,
      >
      > and (3) recorded.
      >
      > The sensors only have finite resolution and a finite number of
      possible
      > outputs that the circuits that do the processing are able to
      discriminate.

      Thank you ever so much for your explanation. This question
      originated from a discussion I was having with my father about the
      underlying pysicality of things, particularly 'information
      processing'. Thank you once again for taking the time to respond to
      my enquiry. Mark Holland.
      >
    • Alan Forrester
      ... Yes. ... Momentum is being transferred between the field and the electron. Whether the electron gains or loses momentum presumably depends on the initial
      Message 42 of 42 , Oct 3, 2006
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        --- Charles Goodwin <charlesgoodwin@...> wrote:

        > > |
        > > |
        > > Force this way ---> |
        > > |
        > > Not this way ^ |
        > > |
        > >
        > > The electron will experience a force toward the line, but not
        > > parallel to it (to some approximation). So the electron will
        > > continue to move up the page, and will feel a force pulling
        > > it to the right to start with. The electron will overshoot
        > > the line to the right and will then start to move left back
        > > toward the line. The electron will repeat this little dance
        > > and so will spiral round the line.
        >
        > So are you saying it's oscillation around an equilibrium position?

        Yes.

        > And that
        > the momentum from the proton is being transferred to the electron (to
        > some
        > extent) ?

        Momentum is being transferred between the field and the electron. Whether
        the electron gains or loses momentum presumably depends on the initial
        conditions although I haven't figured that out.

        Alan



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