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Re: Familiarlty with the SuperAntenna MP1D?

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  • n2znc
    Partially correct if you want to risk your radio. Antenna analyzers do more than simply tell you the swr on an antenna. If there is a problem with your
    Message 1 of 7 , May 18, 2013
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      Partially correct if you want to risk your radio. Antenna analyzers do more than simply tell you the swr on an antenna. If there is a problem with your antenna, you wont really know, unless you happen to see the power output decrease on your radio. Since most modern radios will automatically cut power down when there is a significant mismatch.
      The 950 has a nice built-in tuner, but there are limitations to it and a wide range tuner is always better to protect your radio. An analyzer is great for those of us that like to built antennas, especially when you start messing with complicated beams.

      So its a tool, just like a multimeter or any other tool. Personally its another tool that should be part of your arsenal and learning how to use it is a great thing.

      Also measuring power output and swr using the radio meter isnt very accurate at all. Just like using the radio voltage meter isnt accurate either.

      George


      --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, Alex Netherton <anetherton@...> wrote:
      >
      > I see antenna analyzers as an unnecessary cost, as I have for most of my
      > life been chronically short of funds. A properly designed antenna should
      > work acceptably without analysis IMHO.
      > I got my 950 a week ago, threw up a wire, and have been making dozens of
      > contacts since.
      > Just get on the air and tune for lowest SWR.
      >
      > KC4BO
      > On May 14, 2013 5:35 PM, "ericbnyc" <ericbnyc@...> wrote:
      >
      > > **
      > >
      > >
      > > Is anyone familiar with the Superantenna Mp1d with the 897D in a mobile
      > > scenario? It was recommended to me by a salesperson at Ham Radio Outlet as
      > > a good cross between function and cost. I've seen some eham.com comments
      > > and a couple of Youtube videos and it looks like an acceptable starter
      > > antenna for me. I would be buying it with hope of being able to use it
      > > without nece3ssarily buying an antenna analyzer just yet - I'm trying to
      > > split up some of the purchases of a first rig into a couple of different
      > > months to spread out the expenses.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • n2znc
      Hi Eric, A couple of guys from our club have one and we have played with it in the field. The MP1 is a great little antenna and easy to use. A meter is great
      Message 2 of 7 , May 18, 2013
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        Hi Eric,

        A couple of guys from our club have one and we have played with it in the field.
        The MP1 is a great little antenna and easy to use. A meter is great to have and use, alot of our guys including myself have the mfj 259b, easy to use and does more than simply help with swr issues. We all got together yesterday and one of our guys picked up an mp1 (slightly older than the current version) we set it up and it worked great. The newer deluxe model has some nice features to it. I also have the YP3 although we broke the banana plug-bnc connector , gotta get a new one now.

        Yesterday we were on the buddypole talking around the world (ok the caribbean islands and europe) on 17m from the park. I have both the 897d for portable operation and 857d in the car. Love that 897D its a great radio, have had it for over a year now. I bought mine with the ldg tuner.

        While you certainly can have alot of fun without spending a fortune, its alot of fun playing with the toys.

        george
        n2znc

        --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, "ericbnyc" <ericbnyc@...> wrote:
        >
        > Is anyone familiar with the Superantenna Mp1d with the 897D in a mobile scenario? It was recommended to me by a salesperson at Ham Radio Outlet as a good cross between function and cost. I've seen some eham.com comments and a couple of Youtube videos and it looks like an acceptable starter antenna for me. I would be buying it with hope of being able to use it without nece3ssarily buying an antenna analyzer just yet - I'm trying to split up some of the purchases of a first rig into a couple of different months to spread out the expenses.
        >
      • Jason Turning
        You can tune the MP1 without an antenna analyzer though its more of a pain. You have to take SWR readings at the ends of the band to figure out where the
        Message 3 of 7 , May 18, 2013
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          You can tune the MP1 without an antenna analyzer though its more of a pain. You
          have to take SWR readings at the ends of the band to figure out where the
          antenna is resonant and then adjust, lengthen to lower, shorten to raise the
          resonant frequency. Where the SWR value is lower is pointing towards where the
          antenna is resonant. If you're below 2:1 on the band or segment you want to
          work you're already good to go. Not directly familiar with the MP1, but believe
          its still uses the radial. With my Mini-Buddipole when doing a vertical I know
          the coil setting and then tune the antenna by lengthening or shortening the radial.

          Of course if you're working with resonant antennas that don't require tuners,
          an antenna analyzer is very handy. If will show you exactly where the antenna
          is resonant making adjustment a snap. It will also allow you to dial in the
          antenna perfectly for where you are working. Using resonant antennas also
          minimizes coax losses which can be really bad depending on coax type/length and
          SWR on the antenna and tuners add a little loss as well. I have an MFJ-259B
          which I love and take with me every time I go out unless hiking.

          One thing to keep in mind with antenna analyzers is they are susceptible to RF
          and static shock. If you have strong RF fields nearby they won't work properly
          and I've heard of guys damaging them. You can usually figure it out as you
          won't get a normal resonant null. MFJ makes a pricey filter that will work with
          any analyzer so you can still use it in a high RF environment, or you can
          revert to SWR readings. Static buildup from dusty wind, nearby thunderstorms,
          or rain/snow static can supposedly also wipe them out too. I just experienced
          this static buildup a couple weekends ago up in the high country of Nevada
          where luckily I had finished with the analyzer, but then tuning around getting
          ready to operate in 7QP I started getting shocked by the rig when it started
          snowing. I immediately unplugged the coax while getting shocked and brushing up
          against the wife and shocking her as I threw the coax out the back window of
          the truck. So I learned the earth has a lot of charge always ready to go to the
          ionosphere or charged clouds through the highest point (your antenna) under
          certain conditions and you need a bleed resister to ground or to your
          counterpoise. There was a thunderstorm a few miles away at the time but I felt
          safe where I was being ignorant about this phenomenon. I've since ordered some
          heavy duty resistors to put in my antenna bag. BTW, no damage to my rig from
          the static but I read where a CQP station had snow static blow out the front
          ends on two IC-756 Pro IIs one year. So a bleed resistor is worth having in
          your antenna bag so you won't miss out on radio joy like I did or end up with a
          damaged rig, :).

          See the section on bleeding off static loads:
          http://www.mydarc.de/dl6ip/kite%20antennae.html
          http://www.ad5x.com/images/Articles/Static%20Bleed.pdf

          Enjoy as you'll have a lot of fun with that vertical out operating portable.
          Hilltops out of the city can be a magical place to play radio. The sloping
          ground away from you lowers your take off angle for DX and you'll be away from
          all the city noise.

          Jason - N6WBL


          On 05/18/2013 06:25 AM, Alex Netherton wrote:
          > I see antenna analyzers as an unnecessary cost, as I have for most of my
          > life been chronically short of funds. A properly designed antenna should
          > work acceptably without analysis IMHO. I got my 950 a week ago, threw up a
          > wire, and have been making dozens of contacts since. Just get on the air and
          > tune for lowest SWR.
          >
          > KC4BO On May 14, 2013 5:35 PM, "ericbnyc" <ericbnyc@...> wrote:
          >
          >>> **
          >>>
          >>>
          >>> Is anyone familiar with the Superantenna Mp1d with the 897D in a mobile
          >>> scenario? It was recommended to me by a salesperson at Ham Radio Outlet
          >>> as a good cross between function and cost. I've seen some eham.com
          >>> comments and a couple of Youtube videos and it looks like an acceptable
          >>> starter antenna for me. I would be buying it with hope of being able to
          >>> use it without nece3ssarily buying an antenna analyzer just yet - I'm
          >>> trying to split up some of the purchases of a first rig into a couple of
          >>> different months to spread out the expenses.
        • Alex Netherton
          I do agree with you, that a ham station can utilize many tools; oscilloscope, antenna analyzer, grid dip meter, and many many more. Unfortunately, I have
          Message 4 of 7 , May 18, 2013
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            I do agree with you, that a ham station can utilize many tools;
            oscilloscope, antenna analyzer, grid dip meter, and many many more.
            Unfortunately, I have always lived at the ragged edge of being broke, and
            have managed to live a fairly long and happy life that way. I have only
            ever had the $$$ to spend on the basics, a rig, a home made antenna, and
            little else. Getting on the air has never been a problem for me, and I have
            never been able to go the "whole hog" and buy all the tools many others
            have.

            I think we have to teach young and broke hams to "make do". Many an "old
            timer" built breadboarded rigs without any test equipment, and had good
            signals. I have even seen some of these "homebrew" rigs.

            I think an antenna analyzer is a fine tool, I just cannot afford one. If
            you can, you will likely have a far better signal than mine. Of course,
            that is not hard to do (hihi!)

            KC4BO


            On Sat, May 18, 2013 at 11:00 AM, n2znc <burbanog@...> wrote:

            > **
            >
            >
            > Partially correct if you want to risk your radio. Antenna analyzers do
            > more than simply tell you the swr on an antenna. If there is a problem with
            > your antenna, you wont really know, unless you happen to see the power
            > output decrease on your radio. Since most modern radios will automatically
            > cut power down when there is a significant mismatch.
            > The 950 has a nice built-in tuner, but there are limitations to it and a
            > wide range tuner is always better to protect your radio. An analyzer is
            > great for those of us that like to built antennas, especially when you
            > start messing with complicated beams.
            >
            > So its a tool, just like a multimeter or any other tool. Personally its
            > another tool that should be part of your arsenal and learning how to use it
            > is a great thing.
            >
            > Also measuring power output and swr using the radio meter isnt very
            > accurate at all. Just like using the radio voltage meter isnt accurate
            > either.
            >
            > George
            >
            > --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, Alex Netherton <anetherton@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > I see antenna analyzers as an unnecessary cost, as I have for most of my
            > > life been chronically short of funds. A properly designed antenna should
            > > work acceptably without analysis IMHO.
            > > I got my 950 a week ago, threw up a wire, and have been making dozens of
            > > contacts since.
            > > Just get on the air and tune for lowest SWR.
            > >
            > > KC4BO
            > > On May 14, 2013 5:35 PM, "ericbnyc" <ericbnyc@...> wrote:
            > >
            > > > **
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Is anyone familiar with the Superantenna Mp1d with the 897D in a mobile
            > > > scenario? It was recommended to me by a salesperson at Ham Radio
            > Outlet as
            > > > a good cross between function and cost. I've seen some eham.comcomments
            > > > and a couple of Youtube videos and it looks like an acceptable starter
            > > > antenna for me. I would be buying it with hope of being able to use it
            > > > without nece3ssarily buying an antenna analyzer just yet - I'm trying
            > to
            > > > split up some of the purchases of a first rig into a couple of
            > different
            > > > months to spread out the expenses.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >
            >
            >
            >



            --
            Alex Netherton
            http://blueridgediscovery.com


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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