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Re: [FT897] 897D Go Kit Project

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  • Jason Turning
    ... The FT-897D is designed for 13.8 volts, and they say plus or minus 15%, so 11.73 to 15.87 volts. And yes the LiFePo are a little more voltage than gel
    Message 1 of 25 , Apr 4, 2013
      On 04/04/13 10:43, Rob McClure wrote:
      > Hello all,
      >
      > I'm thankful for the ham that started this thread as I am looking into
      > alternative ways to power my 897D.
      >
      > I've done some checking and the K2 batteries are actually 12.8v batteries
      > right? I guess since so many are using these, the 12.8v is NOT a problem
      > for the 897D?

      The FT-897D is designed for 13.8 volts, and they say plus or minus 15%, so
      11.73 to 15.87 volts. And yes the LiFePo are a little more voltage than gel
      cells which are lower, 12.7 volts fully charged and then dropping off quite a
      bit. I think my K2 Energy battery was 13.37 volts fully charged when I checked
      it last. And if memory serves the A123 stuff Buddipole sells might be a little
      over 14 volts, around 14.2 to 14.3 volts.

      > While I was looking into this, I found another company that sells these
      > batteries, called Tenergy, using the very same chemistry. They offer a
      > 9.6ah battery WITH a charger for $159, a 12Ah battery for $179 and a 20Ah
      > battery for $279. I do not believe the Tenergy batteries have a BMS, but if
      > you used the battery & charger sensibly, wouldn't this be a lower cost
      > alternative to the K2 batteries?

      The K2 Energy batteries have been used by hams successfully, but looking at the
      Tenergy website they might have a similar product in bigger sizes at a nicer
      price. They mentioned short circuit and overcharge protection, and this Amazon
      listing says they're a drop in replacement for lead acid batteries with no
      change to the charging system, so that would imply a BMS of some sort. You
      could contact the company for more information or buy one and check it out. I'd
      recommend watching it with a Watts Up meter or something similar to make sure
      it functions the way you think it should.

      http://www.amazon.com/Tenergy-LiFePO4-Lithium-Phosphate-Battery/dp/B0056BEJCI

      Consequently, I found a link to some protection circuits for LiFePo batteries
      that Tenergy makes, so they do make BMS systems. So I would bet they provide
      them on the batteries they market as 12v lead acid replacements. One thing I
      notice they have a lower charge current of 2.4A listed, but higher discharge
      rate of 70A.

      Warnings:

      Risk of fire, explosion, or burning.
      Do not short circuit the (+) and (-) terminals with any metals.
      Do not immerse, wet, or throw battery in water.
      Do not keep battery in heated temperature above 60˚C or throw battery into
      fire.
      Do not disassemble, crush, or modify the battery.
      Stop using the battery if abnormal heat, odor, deformation or abnormal
      condition is detected.

      http://www.all-battery.com/tenergy12.8v12ahlifepo4rechargeablebattery-31997.aspx
      http://tinyurl.com/d4vqvoc

      I find the water warning interesting. If you're backpacking in the rain and
      your pack goes up in flames you'll know why, :). They plug them as replacements
      for wheel chairs so I'm sure they're not that dangerous. Though, maybe this has
      to do with taking out the BMS system inside the battery with water.

      > Open to suggestions and comments.
      >
      > 73, Rob, KC5RET

      If you buy one or learn anything else share it with the group. I'm sure there
      are a few of us interested in new battery technology.

      73
      Jason - N6WBL
    • Dean Gibson AE7Q
      Sometimes we forget: the FT-897D is designed for 13.8 volts *WHILE TRANSMITTING*. That s what both my car and my home power supply deliver. I d like to see
      Message 2 of 25 , Apr 4, 2013
        Sometimes we forget: the FT-897D is designed for 13.8 volts *WHILE
        TRANSMITTING*. That's what both my car and my home power supply deliver.

        I'd like to see voltages on the batteries being discussed, *measured
        while transmitting* @ 25W and @ 100W.

        -- Dean

        On 2013-04-04 18:19, Jason Turning wrote:
        >
        > The FT-897D is designed for 13.8 volts, ...
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Chris Robinson
        Having feeling ripped off for the prie of the FNB-78, I am looking for something as well. I was curious as to who had such batteries to begin with, all I seem
        Message 3 of 25 , Apr 4, 2013
          Having feeling ripped off for the prie of the FNB-78, I am looking for
          something as well. I was curious as to who had such batteries to begin
          with, all I seem to find are the standard 12V


          On Thu, Apr 4, 2013 at 6:19 PM, Jason Turning <jturning@...>wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > On 04/04/13 10:43, Rob McClure wrote:
          > > Hello all,
          > >
          > > I'm thankful for the ham that started this thread as I am looking into
          > > alternative ways to power my 897D.
          > >
          > > I've done some checking and the K2 batteries are actually 12.8v
          > batteries
          > > right? I guess since so many are using these, the 12.8v is NOT a problem
          > > for the 897D?
          >
          > The FT-897D is designed for 13.8 volts, and they say plus or minus 15%, so
          > 11.73 to 15.87 volts. And yes the LiFePo are a little more voltage than gel
          > cells which are lower, 12.7 volts fully charged and then dropping off
          > quite a
          > bit. I think my K2 Energy battery was 13.37 volts fully charged when I
          > checked
          > it last. And if memory serves the A123 stuff Buddipole sells might be a
          > little
          > over 14 volts, around 14.2 to 14.3 volts.
          >
          >
          > > While I was looking into this, I found another company that sells these
          > > batteries, called Tenergy, using the very same chemistry. They offer a
          > > 9.6ah battery WITH a charger for $159, a 12Ah battery for $179 and a
          > 20Ah
          > > battery for $279. I do not believe the Tenergy batteries have a BMS, but
          > if
          > > you used the battery & charger sensibly, wouldn't this be a lower cost
          > > alternative to the K2 batteries?
          >
          > The K2 Energy batteries have been used by hams successfully, but looking
          > at the
          > Tenergy website they might have a similar product in bigger sizes at a
          > nicer
          > price. They mentioned short circuit and overcharge protection, and this
          > Amazon
          > listing says they're a drop in replacement for lead acid batteries with no
          > change to the charging system, so that would imply a BMS of some sort. You
          > could contact the company for more information or buy one and check it
          > out. I'd
          > recommend watching it with a Watts Up meter or something similar to make
          > sure
          > it functions the way you think it should.
          >
          >
          > http://www.amazon.com/Tenergy-LiFePO4-Lithium-Phosphate-Battery/dp/B0056BEJCI
          >
          > Consequently, I found a link to some protection circuits for LiFePo
          > batteries
          > that Tenergy makes, so they do make BMS systems. So I would bet they
          > provide
          > them on the batteries they market as 12v lead acid replacements. One thing
          > I
          > notice they have a lower charge current of 2.4A listed, but higher
          > discharge
          > rate of 70A.
          >
          > Warnings:
          >
          > Risk of fire, explosion, or burning.
          > Do not short circuit the (+) and (-) terminals with any metals.
          > Do not immerse, wet, or throw battery in water.
          > Do not keep battery in heated temperature above 60˚C or throw battery into
          > fire.
          > Do not disassemble, crush, or modify the battery.
          > Stop using the battery if abnormal heat, odor, deformation or abnormal
          > condition is detected.
          >
          >
          > http://www.all-battery.com/tenergy12.8v12ahlifepo4rechargeablebattery-31997.aspx
          > http://tinyurl.com/d4vqvoc
          >
          > I find the water warning interesting. If you're backpacking in the rain and
          > your pack goes up in flames you'll know why, :). They plug them as
          > replacements
          > for wheel chairs so I'm sure they're not that dangerous. Though, maybe
          > this has
          > to do with taking out the BMS system inside the battery with water.
          >
          >
          > > Open to suggestions and comments.
          > >
          > > 73, Rob, KC5RET
          >
          > If you buy one or learn anything else share it with the group. I'm sure
          > there
          > are a few of us interested in new battery technology.
          >
          > 73
          > Jason - N6WBL
          >
          >
          >



          --
          Making life hell for others since 1973

          Mr.C.Robinson
          73 DE KF6NFW


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Jason Turning
          Per my Watts Up meter with the FT-897D: 20Ah Gel Cell: RX 12.7 V 25w CW 11.93 V 100w CW 11.60 V 6.8Ah K2 Energy LiFePo: RX 13.2 V 25w CW 12.27 V 100w CW 11.64
          Message 4 of 25 , Apr 4, 2013
            Per my Watts Up meter with the FT-897D:

            20Ah Gel Cell:
            RX 12.7 V
            25w CW 11.93 V
            100w CW 11.60 V

            6.8Ah K2 Energy LiFePo:
            RX 13.2 V
            25w CW 12.27 V
            100w CW 11.64 V

            I held the CW for a few seconds into a dummy load and let the voltage settle
            down. I should also point out this was running through my PWRgate as well, and
            the Gel Cell was on the PWRgate and fully charged where the K2 Energy battery
            had set with my portable gear.

            According to the meter on my FT-897D I also get a voltage drop from the power
            supply even though the power supply doesn't show it on the meter which I
            believe is due to the resistance of the power wires under the 17.15 amp load.
            I'm not an electrical engineer so I'll leave for someone else to chime in with.

            Jason - N6WBL

            On 04/04/2013 06:34 PM, Dean Gibson AE7Q wrote:
            > Sometimes we forget: the FT-897D is designed for 13.8 volts *WHILE
            > TRANSMITTING*. That's what both my car and my home power supply deliver.
            >
            > I'd like to see voltages on the batteries being discussed, *measured while
            > transmitting* @ 25W and @ 100W.
            >
            > -- Dean
          • Kim Scheidel
            Donovan, Take a look at the Ventenna HFp for your go kit.  It is very light and portable.  Believe it is just what a go kit needs. I have the vertical one
            Message 5 of 25 , Apr 8, 2013
              Donovan,

              Take a look at the Ventenna HFp for your go kit.  It is very light and portable.  Believe it is just what a go kit needs. I have the vertical one with 80M coil.  Also have the dipole one that does 20-6 meters.  With options you can add 30, 40, 60 and 80 meters to the dipole.  The dipole can also be used on 2M SSB by using just the two whip antennas.  It has been great antenna and the 2 M SSB has been a fun addition.  

              Review of the HFp in this months Popular Communications.   Also you can check out the reviews on e-ham.    Their web site  http://www.ventenna.com/


              Kim,  KE6RKX


              ________________________________
              From: dcawood <dcawood@...>
              To: FT897@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 8:34 AM
              Subject: [FT897] 897D Go Kit Project


               
              Pete and all,

              What do you use to charge the K2 Energy K2B12V10EB 12V 10Ah Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery BMS and ensure it is charged fully, etc?

              I am planning a go kit, its not going to be light but it will have everything I need, I hope. Please anyone tell me what you think. I am new to HAM and want to make sure I get this project right the first time.

              OK. The enclosure is a multi stack enclosure from http://www.tac-comm.com/. I may get a pelican case that it can fit into just for packing and travel, not to work out of like a rack mount enclosure.

              This would be a complete kit for the purpose of immediate pack n go, with ample power stores.

              The first/bottom shelf would have the LifePo battery that Pete is using.

              The second/middle shelf would have an Astron SS-30M power supply. The First and second shelf contents are debatable, I do want to radio on top to get it closer to eye level.

              The third/top shelf would be the 897D Radio that is already loded with two internal batteries and the tac comm top plate would enclose the top shelf.

              The battery, Power Supply, and 897 would all have power pole ends.

              There will be a 897 batter charger installed with a molex 6 pin to power pole and ac adapter for charging from AC or the Power supply.

              The power supply may connect to a powerpole splitter that will allow charging of the batteries at the same time.

              Also, another idea from Pete, there will be a watts'up meter brought to the face of the unit to monitor the incoming voltage.

              Inline fuses to all power sources.

              To top it off, a buddipole system will be used for HF?

              Any ideas of a good VHF/UHF packable antenna system?

              These are my thoughts so far, hasn't reached paper yet, As I said I am a new HAM and would very much appreciate and all critical analysis from the new to the very experienced HAMs out there as this will be my go to radio package.

              Regards,
              Donovan - KF5TSH

              --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, "Pete" <odyssey570@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > Below is a link to some photos I put up of the 4 short cables, which I attempted to describe in my previous post, that I use to connect my battery (K2 Energy) with my Yaesu FT-897D radio. Though I've made several PowerPole cables before, these cables and meter were all ordered from the PowerWerx company (under "Adapter Cables" and "Digital Meters"). To connect the battery, I just disconnect the Molex 6-pin connector that comes from the radio's built-in power supply, and connect the Moles 6-pin connector at the end of the series of cables shown in the pictures.
              >
              > < http://www.flickr.com/photos/11636522@N06/sets/72157633102638443/ >
              > (you can copy and paste link into your browser)
              >
              > The battery I got has a 9.6 amp-hour capacity, is about 6"x4"x2" in size and weighs a bit over 2 lbs. During my Grand Canyon adventure mine ran the radio well on full 100 watts transmitting power for at least 5-6 hours. The model I have has a built-in "Battery Management System"(BMS) which protects it from overcharging, becoming undercharged, cell imbalance, and other things that can damage a lithium iron phosphate (LiFePo) battery. This model does not require a smart charger (in fact should not use one) because the built-in BMS provides the smartness. Any 3-4 amp (not more), 12v charger will do for charging. This type of battery keeps its charge for a long period of non-use, and maintains a very steady voltage rate during use, until it is close to being depleted. Mine has performed beautifully so far.
              >
              > Pete, KE6ZIW
              >




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • w4fjt
              Hi Donovan, Take a look at the Buddipole Group here on Yahoo also. My set-up is shown in the photos section under W4FJT. A simple vertical consisting of a
              Message 6 of 25 , Apr 9, 2013
                Hi Donovan,

                Take a look at the Buddipole Group here on Yahoo also. My set-up is shown in the photos section under W4FJT. A simple vertical consisting of a Buddipole coil, 2 22" arms & long whip on a photo tripod. One elevated radial.

                I use a 33 AH Werker wheelchair battery. It will power the FT-897 for a casual weekend of use and is easy to carry. It wouldn't work for backpacking, but works good for car camping or cabin camping.

                Be sure to post some pictures of your go kit when you get it up and running.

                Jim, W4FJT

                --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, Kim Scheidel <ke6rkx@...> wrote:
                >
                > Donovan,
                >
                > Take a look at the Ventenna HFp for your go kit.  It is very light and portable.  Believe it is just what a go kit needs. I have the vertical one with 80M coil.  Also have the dipole one that does 20-6 meters.  With options you can add 30, 40, 60 and 80 meters to the dipole.  The dipole can also be used on 2M SSB by using just the two whip antennas.  It has been great antenna and the 2 M SSB has been a fun addition.  
                >
                > Review of the HFp in this months Popular Communications.   Also you can check out the reviews on e-ham.    Their web site  http://www.ventenna.com/
                >
                >
                > Kim,  KE6RKX
                >
                >
                > ________________________________
                > From: dcawood <dcawood@...>
                > To: FT897@yahoogroups.com
                > Sent: Sunday, March 31, 2013 8:34 AM
                > Subject: [FT897] 897D Go Kit Project
                >
                >
                >  
                > Pete and all,
                >
                > What do you use to charge the K2 Energy K2B12V10EB 12V 10Ah Lithium Iron Phosphate Battery BMS and ensure it is charged fully, etc?
                >
                > I am planning a go kit, its not going to be light but it will have everything I need, I hope. Please anyone tell me what you think. I am new to HAM and want to make sure I get this project right the first time.
                >
                > OK. The enclosure is a multi stack enclosure from http://www.tac-comm.com/. I may get a pelican case that it can fit into just for packing and travel, not to work out of like a rack mount enclosure.
                >
                > This would be a complete kit for the purpose of immediate pack n go, with ample power stores.
                >
                > The first/bottom shelf would have the LifePo battery that Pete is using.
                >
                > The second/middle shelf would have an Astron SS-30M power supply. The First and second shelf contents are debatable, I do want to radio on top to get it closer to eye level.
                >
                > The third/top shelf would be the 897D Radio that is already loded with two internal batteries and the tac comm top plate would enclose the top shelf.
                >
                > The battery, Power Supply, and 897 would all have power pole ends.
                >
                > There will be a 897 batter charger installed with a molex 6 pin to power pole and ac adapter for charging from AC or the Power supply.
                >
                > The power supply may connect to a powerpole splitter that will allow charging of the batteries at the same time.
                >
                > Also, another idea from Pete, there will be a watts'up meter brought to the face of the unit to monitor the incoming voltage.
                >
                > Inline fuses to all power sources.
                >
                > To top it off, a buddipole system will be used for HF?
                >
                > Any ideas of a good VHF/UHF packable antenna system?
                >
                > These are my thoughts so far, hasn't reached paper yet, As I said I am a new HAM and would very much appreciate and all critical analysis from the new to the very experienced HAMs out there as this will be my go to radio package.
                >
                > Regards,
                > Donovan - KF5TSH
                >
                > --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, "Pete" <odyssey570@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > >
                > > Below is a link to some photos I put up of the 4 short cables, which I attempted to describe in my previous post, that I use to connect my battery (K2 Energy) with my Yaesu FT-897D radio. Though I've made several PowerPole cables before, these cables and meter were all ordered from the PowerWerx company (under "Adapter Cables" and "Digital Meters"). To connect the battery, I just disconnect the Molex 6-pin connector that comes from the radio's built-in power supply, and connect the Moles 6-pin connector at the end of the series of cables shown in the pictures.
                > >
                > > < http://www.flickr.com/photos/11636522@N06/sets/72157633102638443/ >
                > > (you can copy and paste link into your browser)
                > >
                > > The battery I got has a 9.6 amp-hour capacity, is about 6"x4"x2" in size and weighs a bit over 2 lbs. During my Grand Canyon adventure mine ran the radio well on full 100 watts transmitting power for at least 5-6 hours. The model I have has a built-in "Battery Management System"(BMS) which protects it from overcharging, becoming undercharged, cell imbalance, and other things that can damage a lithium iron phosphate (LiFePo) battery. This model does not require a smart charger (in fact should not use one) because the built-in BMS provides the smartness. Any 3-4 amp (not more), 12v charger will do for charging. This type of battery keeps its charge for a long period of non-use, and maintains a very steady voltage rate during use, until it is close to being depleted. Mine has performed beautifully so far.
                > >
                > > Pete, KE6ZIW
                > >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • Trapper John
                Pete, I ve followed the discussion of the K2 Energy battery application for portable use with great interest. The cabling setup you ve worked out is quite
                Message 7 of 25 , May 4, 2013
                  Pete, I've followed the discussion of the K2 Energy battery application for portable use with great interest. The cabling setup you've worked out is quite clever. One comment you made in another post left me wondering, though. You mentioned forgetting to charge your battery on one occasion. Here's the question:

                  How do you charge the battery when you are in the field? The question is not facetious; you may have had access to an AC hookup,, a portable generator, etc. My interest stems from the fact that my QTH is a Teardrop trailer with solar charging capability and I am trying to figure out a panel configuration that will give me a charging option.

                  73,
                  Trapper John
                  KG7CFV

                  >
                  > --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, "Pete" <odyssey570@> wrote:
                  > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  > > Below is a link to some photos I put up of the 4 short cables, which I attempted to describe in my previous post, that I use to connect my battery (K2 Energy) with my Yaesu FT-897D radio. Though I've made several PowerPole cables before, these cables and meter were all ordered from the PowerWerx company (under "Adapter Cables" and "Digital Meters"). To connect the battery, I just disconnect the Molex 6-pin connector that comes from the radio's built-in power supply, and connect the Moles 6-pin connector at the end of the series of cables shown in the pictures.
                  > >
                  > > < http://www.flickr.com/photos/11636522@N06/sets/72157633102638443/ >
                  > > (you can copy and paste link into your browser)
                  > >
                  > > The battery I got has a 9.6 amp-hour capacity, is about 6"x4"x2" in size and weighs a bit over 2 lbs. During my Grand Canyon adventure mine ran the radio well on full 100 watts transmitting power for at least 5-6 hours. The model I have has a built-in "Battery Management System"(BMS) which protects it from overcharging, becoming undercharged, cell imbalance, and other things that can damage a lithium iron phosphate (LiFePo) battery. This model does not require a smart charger (in fact should not use one) because the built-in BMS provides the smartness. Any 3-4 amp (not more), 12v charger will do for charging. This type of battery keeps its charge for a long period of non-use, and maintains a very steady voltage rate during use, until it is close to being depleted. Mine has performed beautifully so far.
                  > >
                  > > Pete, KE6ZIW
                  > >
                  >
                • Jason Turning
                  John, As long as you get the K2 Energy with the battery management system you can use any regular 12v charging system. You can just plug it into your vehicle
                  Message 8 of 25 , May 7, 2013
                    John,

                    As long as you get the K2 Energy with the battery management system you can use
                    any regular 12v charging system. You can just plug it into your vehicle on the
                    way out portable to charge or use a regular 12v charge controller with solar
                    panels. I've done both, charging from the vehicle and using a solar panel while
                    operating. The BMS controls the charge to the battery and will shut it off when
                    the batter is fully charged as I've watched my Watts Up meter while it was
                    plugged into the vehicle and driving. The battery loses very little charge just
                    sitting, so I just charge mine when I get back and its ready to go.

                    Jason - N6WBL

                    On 05/04/2013 11:24 PM, Trapper John wrote:
                    > Pete, I've followed the discussion of the K2 Energy battery application for portable use with great interest. The cabling setup you've worked out is quite clever. One comment you made in another post left me wondering, though. You mentioned forgetting to charge your battery on one occasion. Here's the question:
                    >
                    > How do you charge the battery when you are in the field? The question is not facetious; you may have had access to an AC hookup,, a portable generator, etc. My interest stems from the fact that my QTH is a Teardrop trailer with solar charging capability and I am trying to figure out a panel configuration that will give me a charging option.
                    >
                    > 73,
                    > Trapper John
                    > KG7CFV
                  • Pete
                    Hi Trapper John. When I forgot to charge the K2 battery overnight I was staying at the Grand Canyon at one of the lodges where there was 110V AC power. The
                    Message 9 of 25 , May 7, 2013
                      Hi Trapper John. When I forgot to charge the K2 battery overnight I was staying at the Grand Canyon at one of the lodges where there was 110V AC power. The "12V" (14.4V, 3A) charger I use for the battery plugs into 110V. I don't have any experience with charging the battery with anything other than access to 110V.

                      I used the battery on two successive days with my FT-897D and Buddipole antenna, with radio set to 100W transmitting. After the first day of about 2 1/2 hrs radio use (maybe 30%-40% transmitting duty), I foolishly forgot to recharge the battery. The next day I used the radio about another 2 1/2 - 3 hrs with radio set to 100W. When I quit, my Watt's Up meter showed the battery was still putting out 11.9V while transmitting (and around 12.3V on receive). The radio's manual recommends the lowest voltage to run the 897 on is about 11.7. So after about 5-6 hrs of combined use the battery was still doing well and allowing great contacts with operators in 9 different states.

                      I described my experience, with a few photos, on Flickr at: < http://www.flickr.com/photos/11636522@N06/sets/72157633054005624/ >

                      Pete, KE6ZIW
                      =======================

                      --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, "Trapper John" <john.stec@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Pete, I've followed the discussion of the K2 Energy battery application for portable use with great interest. The cabling setup you've worked out is quite clever. One comment you made in another post left me wondering, though. You mentioned forgetting to charge your battery on one occasion. Here's the question:
                      >
                      > How do you charge the battery when you are in the field? The question is not facetious; you may have had access to an AC hookup,, a portable generator, etc. My interest stems from the fact that my QTH is a Teardrop trailer with solar charging capability and I am trying to figure out a panel configuration that will give me a charging option.
                      >
                      > 73,
                      > Trapper John
                      > KG7CFV
                      >
                      > >
                      > > --- In FT897@yahoogroups.com, "Pete" <odyssey570@> wrote:
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > >
                      > > > Below is a link to some photos I put up of the 4 short cables, which I attempted to describe in my previous post, that I use to connect my battery (K2 Energy) with my Yaesu FT-897D radio. Though I've made several PowerPole cables before, these cables and meter were all ordered from the PowerWerx company (under "Adapter Cables" and "Digital Meters"). To connect the battery, I just disconnect the Molex 6-pin connector that comes from the radio's built-in power supply, and connect the Moles 6-pin connector at the end of the series of cables shown in the pictures.
                      > > >
                      > > > < http://www.flickr.com/photos/11636522@N06/sets/72157633102638443/ >
                      > > > (you can copy and paste link into your browser)
                      > > >
                      > > > The battery I got has a 9.6 amp-hour capacity, is about 6"x4"x2" in size and weighs a bit over 2 lbs. During my Grand Canyon adventure mine ran the radio well on full 100 watts transmitting power for at least 5-6 hours. The model I have has a built-in "Battery Management System"(BMS) which protects it from overcharging, becoming undercharged, cell imbalance, and other things that can damage a lithium iron phosphate (LiFePo) battery. This model does not require a smart charger (in fact should not use one) because the built-in BMS provides the smartness. Any 3-4 amp (not more), 12v charger will do for charging. This type of battery keeps its charge for a long period of non-use, and maintains a very steady voltage rate during use, until it is close to being depleted. Mine has performed beautifully so far.
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                      > > > Pete, KE6ZIW
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