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how they decide. Re: [FSP_DFW] My FSP *feature* story

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  • Gold Standard Press
    When 5,000 people sign a letter of intent, the FSP leadership will decide which of the current 10 candidate states will be the target for relocation.
    Message 1 of 2 , May 31, 2003
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      When 5,000 people sign a "letter of intent," the FSP leadership will decide
      which of the current 10 candidate states will be the target for relocation.
      **********

      the 5,000 will decide by Condorset voting method.

      c.


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Joey Dauben <joeydauben@...>
      To: <FSP_DFW@yahoogroups.com>; <RLC_DFW@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Saturday, May 31, 2003 6:25 PM
      Subject: [FSP_DFW] My FSP *feature* story


      >
      > I asked a local mom what her views were on the FSP, and she literally sent
      > me my story - so alas, Plan B of my FSP article.
      >
      > I seriously think this one is a lot better:
      >
      >
      >
      > Saved As: Nws-TaxesFSP
      > Word Count: 730
      >
      > Mom struggles with higher taxes, homeschooling daughter
      >
      > Finds hope in 'Free State Project'
      >
      > JOEY DAUBEN
      > The Ellis County Press
      > ELLIS COUNTY - Kathryn Dillon is at a cross-roads with her life.
      > Dillon, who lives near Frost, in southern Ellis County, left her
      > high-paying biotechnology job in California so she could homeschool and
      > spend more time with her 12-year-old daughter.
      > But now, with higher taxes and the country as a whole getting worse with
      > terrorism fears and a loss of freedoms, it's become hard for her to live
      > here.
      > "It was quite a financial hardship when I stopped working to homeschool,"
      > said Dillon. "It puzzled me that it was so difficult for a family to
      survive
      > on one salary these days. It used to be standard practice.
      > "Eventually, I came to the conclusion that paying 40-plus percent in taxes
      > was killing the traditional family structure."
      > There's really not much hope in getting relief, not only from the
      > increasing tax load, but society as a whole, she said.
      > "The Patriot Act in particular makes me believe that the end of our
      country
      > is near, if we don't do something about it," she said. "It is [also]
      > particularly distressing that our family has to pay an exorbitant amount
      for
      > a school system that one, we don't use and have to pay out of pocket for
      our
      > own school supplies and two, a system that is not only not educating
      > children but I believe is doing them active harm.
      > "I know from personal experience that it takes nowhere near [state,
      > national average] $5,000 a student per year to educate a child."
      > With with the pressures, Dillon hasn't given up all hope.
      > The Free State Project, a plan in which 20,000 or more liberty-minded
      > people will move to a single state of the U.S., where they can work within
      > the political system to reduce the size and scope of government, has
      gained
      > considerable national attention, and has people like Dillon seeking for a
      > change.
      > "I believe we're at a point in this country where it is absolutely
      critical
      > that people take a stand against the deterioration of the constitution and
      > the erosion of our liberties," Dillon said. "I'd been told that something
      > like this had been tried in Fort Collins, Colorado, but I never heard of
      any
      > resounding success from the effort."
      > The FSP gained prominence when economist Walter Williams, a professor at
      > George Mason University in Virginia, wrote about the movement and gave it
      > his full endorsement; Williams' FSP column was featured in this newspaper
      > last year.
      > When 5,000 people sign a "letter of intent," the FSP leadership will
      decide
      > which of the current 10 candidate states will be the target for
      relocation.
      > Currently, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Montana, Delaware, North and South
      > Dakota, Vermont, Alaska, Maine and Nevada are up for consideration; the
      > goals are simple, according to FSP Vice President Elizabeth McKinstry.
      > "We believe that being free and independent is a great way to live," she
      > said.
      > Specifically, plans include finding fellow FSP members to run for local
      and
      > statewide office, enact laws to abolish what McKinstry calls "government
      > waste" and above all, reduce taxes.
      > "We will repeal state taxes and wasteful state government programs," she
      > said. "We will end asset forfeiture and abuses of eminent domain,
      privatize
      > utilities and end inefficient regulations and monopolies."
      > Some lawmakers from the candidate states have labeled the movement as
      > "extreme," saying it would be impossible for so many people to
      conglomerate
      > in one area and be able to carry out the proposed plans.
      > However, McKinstry said it wouldn't be thousands all at once, and even
      some
      > state governors, like Republican Craig Benson of New Hampshire, have
      > supported the FSP's plans.
      > Despite a small amount of skepticism, Dillon sees it as an oppurtunity to
      > make an attempt at a better world for her, and for her daughter.
      > "I didn't have to struggle long with the decision to sign up for the FSP,
      > it's something I've always wanted to do," she said. "I happened to be at a
      > point in my life when I was actively looking for someplace to relocate.
      > As for whether the FSP will work, Dillon said she's not completely
      > convinced.
      > "I think it will work to pick a state and have people move there, but
      > whether we can stem the tide of intrusive government, I'm not sure," she
      > said. "I'm willing to give it a try, though."
      > For more information about the FSP, visit http://www.freestateproject.org
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > MSN 8 with e-mail virus protection service: 2 months FREE*
      > http://join.msn.com/?page=features/virus
      >
      >
      >
      > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
      > FSP_DFW-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
      >
      >
      >
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      >
      >
      >
    • Aaron Holding
      Good eye Chuck. Thanks for the correction. I think this is a great article Joey! Just my .02 Aaron ... From: Gold Standard Press To: FSP_DFW@yahoogroups.com
      Message 2 of 2 , Jun 1, 2003
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        Good eye Chuck.  Thanks for the correction.  I think this is a great article Joey!
         
        Just my .02
         
        Aaron
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Sunday, June 01, 2003 12:45 AM
        Subject: how they decide. Re: [FSP_DFW] My FSP *feature* story

        When 5,000 people sign a "letter of intent," the FSP leadership will decide
        which of the current 10 candidate states will be the target for relocation.
        **********

        the 5,000 will decide by Condorset voting method.

        c.


        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Joey Dauben <joeydauben@...>
        To: <FSP_DFW@yahoogroups.com>; <RLC_DFW@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, May 31, 2003 6:25 PM
        Subject: [FSP_DFW] My FSP *feature* story


        >
        > I asked a local mom what her views were on the FSP, and she literally sent
        > me my story - so alas, Plan B of my FSP article.
        >
        > I seriously think this one is a lot better:
        >
        >
        >
        > Saved As: Nws-TaxesFSP
        > Word Count: 730
        >
        > Mom struggles with higher taxes, homeschooling daughter
        >
        > Finds hope in 'Free State Project'
        >
        > JOEY DAUBEN
        > The Ellis County Press
        > ELLIS COUNTY - Kathryn Dillon is at a cross-roads with her life.
        > Dillon, who lives near Frost, in southern Ellis County, left her
        > high-paying biotechnology job in California so she could homeschool and
        > spend more time with her 12-year-old daughter.
        > But now, with higher taxes and the country as a whole getting worse with
        > terrorism fears and a loss of freedoms, it's become hard for her to live
        > here.
        > "It was quite a financial hardship when I stopped working to homeschool,"
        > said Dillon. "It puzzled me that it was so difficult for a family to
        survive
        > on one salary these days.  It used to be standard practice.
        > "Eventually, I came to the conclusion that paying 40-plus percent in taxes
        > was killing the traditional family structure."
        > There's really not much hope in getting relief, not only from the
        > increasing tax load, but society as a whole, she said.
        > "The Patriot Act in particular makes me believe that the end of our
        country
        > is near, if we don't do something about it," she said. "It is [also]
        > particularly distressing that our family has to pay an exorbitant amount
        for
        > a school system that one, we don't use and have to pay out of pocket for
        our
        > own school supplies and two, a system that is not only not educating
        > children but I believe is doing them active harm.
        > "I know from personal experience that it takes nowhere near [state,
        > national average] $5,000 a student per year to educate a child."
        > With with the pressures, Dillon hasn't given up all hope.
        > The Free State Project, a plan in which 20,000 or more liberty-minded
        > people will move to a single state of the U.S., where they can work within
        > the political system to reduce the size and scope of government, has
        gained
        > considerable national attention, and has people like Dillon seeking for a
        > change.
        > "I believe we're at a point in this country where it is absolutely
        critical
        > that people take a stand against the deterioration of the constitution and
        > the erosion of our liberties," Dillon said. "I'd been told that something
        > like this had been tried in Fort Collins, Colorado, but I never heard of
        any
        > resounding success from the effort."
        > The FSP gained prominence when economist Walter Williams, a professor at
        > George Mason University in Virginia, wrote about the movement and gave it
        > his full endorsement; Williams' FSP column was featured in this newspaper
        > last year.
        > When 5,000 people sign a "letter of intent," the FSP leadership will
        decide
        > which of the current 10 candidate states will be the target for
        relocation.
        > Currently, New Hampshire, Wyoming, Montana, Delaware, North and South
        > Dakota, Vermont, Alaska, Maine and Nevada are up for consideration; the
        > goals are simple, according to FSP Vice President Elizabeth McKinstry.
        > "We believe that being free and independent is a great way to live," she
        > said.
        > Specifically, plans include finding fellow FSP members to run for local
        and
        > statewide office, enact laws to abolish what McKinstry calls "government
        > waste" and above all, reduce taxes.
        > "We will repeal state taxes and wasteful state government programs," she
        > said. "We will end asset forfeiture and abuses of eminent domain,
        privatize
        > utilities and end inefficient regulations and monopolies."
        > Some lawmakers from the candidate states have labeled the movement as
        > "extreme," saying it would be impossible for so many people to
        conglomerate
        > in one area and be able to carry out the proposed plans.
        > However, McKinstry said it wouldn't be thousands all at once, and even
        some
        > state governors, like Republican Craig Benson of New Hampshire, have
        > supported the FSP's plans.
        > Despite a small amount of skepticism, Dillon sees it as an oppurtunity to
        > make an attempt at a better world for her, and for her daughter.
        > "I didn't have to struggle long with the decision to sign up for the FSP,
        > it's something I've always wanted to do," she said. "I happened to be at a
        > point in my life when I was actively looking for someplace to relocate.
        > As for whether the FSP will work, Dillon said she's not completely
        > convinced.
        > "I think it will work to pick a state and have people move there, but
        > whether we can stem the tide of intrusive government, I'm not sure," she
        > said. "I'm willing to give it a try, though."
        > For more information about the FSP, visit http://www.freestateproject.org.
        >
        > _________________________________________________________________
        > MSN 8 with e-mail virus protection service: 2 months FREE*
        > http://join.msn.com/?page=features/virus
        >
        >
        >
        > To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
        > FSP_DFW-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        >
        >
        > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
        >
        >
        >



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