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RE: [FS32NGModelrail] 1:18 railroading using G gauge track.

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  • Stephen Auslender
    The mention of the 7/8”=1’-0” scale (1:13.7 size) using G gauge track (1.75 inches or 45mm) means that the G track is a 24 inch gauge. That has led my
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 31, 2010

      The mention of the 7/8”=1’-0” scale (1:13.7 size) using G gauge track (1.75 inches or 45mm) means that the G track is a 24 inch gauge. That has led my fertile imagination to another scale. The rise in popularity of 1/18 size over the past decade started me thinking.  There have appeared on the market a plethora of military figures in 1/18 size as well as many interesting civilian cars and small trucks and many WW2 German and USA military tanks, halftracks, artillery, etc. Since I like military railroads and I like this scale, why not use this scale for a military railroad?

      The scale for 1:18 size is an untraditional scale of 1”=1.5’-0”, or stated another way, 2/3”=1’-0”.

      So, one may ask, if I wanted to make a model railroad to that scale, what real life gauge would my G gauge track scale out to be, and two, what do I do for motive power?

      Well, 1.75” track gauge is, in 1:18 size, 31.5 inches (170mm). As far as I am concerned that is pretty close to the narrow gauge of 2½ feet .

      Good enough for me. So I can make my own military locomotives, armored of course, using that scale. I can invent my own style of armored train or I can scale existing paper card models of armored trains to that scale. The paper models are made to the scale of 1/25 and are easily scaled up or down on a copy machine. I can scale the paper card model train up to full 1/18 size and just run it on existing G gauge model train chassis. No one will notice the difference in wheel appearance as the armor will cover most of those details.

      To me, the fun of modeling is not copying in a smaller scale what actually existed in real life, but is in the creation of my own reality. I invent my own real life items and then make models of my own creations.

      That is what makes model railroading, or any modeling for that matter, interesting and worth doing.

      I am not saying anyone else should model that way, but I sure enjoy it. As far as I am concerned, the primary function of modeling anything is for the fun and pleasure one gets from the activity.

      Stephen Auslender

      P.S. for an example of 7/8”=1’-0” scale modeling see this link:

      http://www.7-8ths.info/index.php?topic=16680976.0

    • daniel caso
      Mark:      Great photos! Thank you for sharing.                  Daniel ... From: stoney17111 Subject:
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2010
        Mark:

             Great photos! Thank you for sharing.

                         Daniel

        --- On Sun, 1/31/10, stoney17111 <stoney17111@...> wrote:

        From: stoney17111 <stoney17111@...>
        Subject: [FS32NGModelrail] Interesting French WW1 Military Railway...
        To: FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, January 31, 2010, 7:50 PM

         

        Hello All,

        Here is some interesting info on a French WW1 Military Railway...

        http://pagesperso- orange.fr/ petittraindedany /Strategique_ de_Belfort. html

        Regards,
        Mark Stonbraker


        Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
      • daniel caso
        Stephen:     Our fellow Henrik knows a lot about 7/8.     I am working on four 7/8 projects at the moment (waiting for the ordered casting stuff) and I
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 1, 2010
          Stephen:

              Our fellow Henrik knows a lot about 7/8.
              I am working on four 7/8 projects at the moment (waiting for the ordered casting stuff) and I see it will be an option for me, some years from now, if my eyes insist on becoming lazy.
              What i like of it is the massive of everything and the possibility of using real bolts and rivets where needed.
               Anyway, as long as my eyes can do it, I'll stay on 16,5mm track.

                        Daniel

          --- On Sun, 1/31/10, Stephen Auslender <auslend@...> wrote:

          From: Stephen Auslender <auslend@...>
          Subject: RE: [FS32NGModelrail] 1:18 railroading using G gauge track.
          To: FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Sunday, January 31, 2010, 8:43 PM

           

          The mention of the 7/8”=1’-0” scale (1:13.7 size) using G gauge track (1.75 inches or 45mm) means that the G track is a 24 inch gauge. That has led my fertile imagination to another scale. The rise in popularity of 1/18 size over the past decade started me thinking.  There have appeared on the market a plethora of military figures in 1/18 size as well as many interesting civilian cars and small trucks and many WW2 German and USA military tanks, halftracks, artillery, etc. Since I like military railroads and I like this scale, why not use this scale for a military railroad?

          The scale for 1:18 size is an untraditional scale of 1”=1.5’-0”, or stated another way, 2/3”=1’-0”.

          So, one may ask, if I wanted to make a model railroad to that scale, what real life gauge would my G gauge track scale out to be, and two, what do I do for motive power?

          Well, 1.75” track gauge is, in 1:18 size, 31.5 inches (170mm). As far as I am concerned that is pretty close to the narrow gauge of 2½ feet .

          Good enough for me. So I can make my own military locomotives, armored of course, using that scale. I can invent my own style of armored train or I can scale existing paper card models of armored trains to that scale. The paper models are made to the scale of 1/25 and are easily scaled up or down on a copy machine. I can scale the paper card model train up to full 1/18 size and just run it on existing G gauge model train chassis. No one will notice the difference in wheel appearance as the armor will cover most of those details.

          To me, the fun of modeling is not copying in a smaller scale what actually existed in real life, but is in the creation of my own reality. I invent my own real life items and then make models of my own creations.

          That is what makes model railroading, or any modeling for that matter, interesting and worth doing.

          I am not saying anyone else should model that way, but I sure enjoy it. As far as I am concerned, the primary function of modeling anything is for the fun and pleasure one gets from the activity.

          Stephen Auslender

          P.S. for an example of 7/8”=1’-0” scale modeling see this link:

          http://www.7- 8ths.info/ index.php? topic=16680976. 0


          Send instant messages to your online friends http://uk.messenger.yahoo.com
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