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RE: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"

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  • Vince Bradley
    Charles, This is the age old problem. I have regauged several HO chassis with mixed results. Since I am freelancing I can use the Life Like chassis from the
    Message 1 of 9 , Nov 10, 2008
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      Charles,

      This is the age old problem.  I have regauged several HO chassis with mixed results.  Since I am freelancing I can use the Life Like chassis from the SW7 with excellent results.  Also, the Bachmann trolley works well regagued.

      Vincent Bradley

       

      From: FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Charles Hansen
      Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 9:30 AM
      To: FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"

       

      Vince -

      However - are there any inexpensive On3-gauged chassis for building critters?  For me that is the attraction of 1:35n24.

      Charles

      > Personally I would suggest 24". There is a reasonable amount of support in
      the US for On3 track and other stuff. That is what I am doing.

      Vincent Bradley,

      Cincinnati, Ohio

    • Woodie Greene
      Vince-here s a possible answer. It is YOUR railroad and you can do whatever you want. I began in this scale as 1:32n20 on 16.5MM gauge but as time wore on, I
      Message 2 of 9 , Nov 10, 2008
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        Vince-here's a possible answer. It is YOUR railroad and you can do whatever you want. I began in this scale as 1:32n20 on 16.5MM gauge but as time wore on, I suddenly (duh!) came to the conclusion that I was modifying 1:35 military figures, using 1:35 and 1:32 autos & trucks, and detail parts from most all scales so I modified my scale to "roughly" 35n2 since I sort of model the Silver City, Pinos Altos, & Mogollon 2 foot line. Sure, in 1:35, the track gauge is not EXACTLY 24", but I can live with that. Besides, I am running Shays and a couple of rod locos and have you priced an On3 Shay these days...considering you will be cutting it up and changing it to a larger scale? If the minor gauge difference bothers someone, available On30 locos CAN be reguaged to On3 and then fixed up to 1:32 or whatever. This is only my opinion but I have an almost complete and operating 2 foot gauge layout that I have built instead of worrying over trivial things like exact scale. So, have fun and build something that will infuriate the punters & counters.     Woodie  

        --- On Mon, 11/10/08, Vince Bradley <vince.bradley@...> wrote:
        From: Vince Bradley <vince.bradley@...>
        Subject: RE: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"
        To: FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Monday, November 10, 2008, 11:20 AM

        Charles,

        This is the age old problem.  I have regauged several HO chassis with mixed results.  Since I am freelancing I can use the Life Like chassis from the SW7 with excellent results.  Also, the Bachmann trolley works well regagued.

        Vincent Bradley

         

        From: FS32NGModelrail@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:FS32NGModel rail@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of Charles Hansen
        Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 9:30 AM
        To: FS32NGModelrail@ yahoogroups. com
        Subject: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"

         

        > Personally I would suggest 24". There is a reasonable amount of support in
        the US for On3 track and other stuff. That is what I am doing.

        Vincent Bradley,

        Cincinnati, Ohio

        Vince -

        However - are there any inexpensive On3-gauged chassis for building critters?  For me that is the attraction of 1:35n24.

        Charles

      • Stephen Auslender
        All this gauging and regauging reminds me of the O scale controversy of the 1930 s and into the 1940 s. O gauge scale track measures 1.25 inch gauge. But that
        Message 3 of 9 , Nov 10, 2008
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          All this gauging and regauging reminds me of the O scale controversy of the 1930's and into the 1940's. O gauge scale track measures 1.25 inch gauge. But that is 60 inches in 1/4" scale, not 56.5 inches as it should be. So a number of RR modelers decided to stay with the track gauge and the available trucks and drive wheel sets but enlarge the size of all the rest of the cars and locomotives. So they built models to 17/64 scale instead of 1/48 (16/64). In 17/64 scale the 1.25 gauge of O scale track was closer to the real gauge.
          I used to have catalogs showing parts available in both 1/4 and 17/64 scales.
          What can I say? Both groups of modelers were happy with their scales and that's the purpose of a hobby, as far as I can see it.
          Same thing with the narrow gauge you decide to use. Its your model railroad, do whatever you want. If you want to be true to the gauge and scale, do so. If it doesn't matter that much work in whatever scale is convenient for you. I'm using G gauge track. If  I want narrow gauge I'll use either  O or HO gauge tracks, whichever looks better to me. I'm already planning on mixing 1/35, 1/32, and 1/29 scales on the same track. So I certainly will not be overly worried about the narrow gauge aspects of it. As I already have a lot of HO gauge track and switches left over from the old days I'll probably use that for the narrow gauge of 60mm (~24"). In 1/32 scale HO track that will give me 20 inch narrow gauge. Yes, it is not 24 inch but that's what I have and that's fine with me. If I were living in England where OO track is common that I would use OO track and be a bit closer to the scale 60mm..
          It does not bother me.
          It's a free country. If you want very close to scale then make the sacrifices in money and effort and make your railroad closer to scale.   
          Its only a hobby. Enjoy.
          Stephen
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 12:34 PM
          Subject: RE: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"

          Vince-here's a possible answer. It is YOUR railroad and you can do whatever you want. I began in this scale as 1:32n20 on 16.5MM gauge but as time wore on, I suddenly (duh!) came to the conclusion that I was modifying 1:35 military figures, using 1:35 and 1:32 autos & trucks, and detail parts from most all scales so I modified my scale to "roughly" 35n2 since I sort of model the Silver City, Pinos Altos, & Mogollon 2 foot line. Sure, in 1:35, the track gauge is not EXACTLY 24", but I can live with that. Besides, I am running Shays and a couple of rod locos and have you priced an On3 Shay these days...considering you will be cutting it up and changing it to a larger scale? If the minor gauge difference bothers someone, available On30 locos CAN be reguaged to On3 and then fixed up to 1:32 or whatever. This is only my opinion but I have an almost complete and operating 2 foot gauge layout that I have built instead of worrying over trivial things like exact scale. So, have fun and build something that will infuriate the punters & counters.     Woodie  

          --- On Mon, 11/10/08, Vince Bradley <vince.bradley@ faxon-machining. com> wrote:
          From: Vince Bradley <vince.bradley@ faxon-machining. com>
          Subject: RE: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"
          To: FS32NGModelrail@ yahoogroups. com
          Date: Monday, November 10, 2008, 11:20 AM

          Charles,

          This is the age old problem.  I have regauged several HO chassis with mixed results.  Since I am freelancing I can use the Life Like chassis from the SW7 with excellent results.  Also, the Bachmann trolley works well regagued.

          Vincent Bradley

           

          From: FS32NGModelrail@ yahoogroups. com [mailto:FS32NGModel rail@yahoogroups .com] On Behalf Of Charles Hansen
          Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 9:30 AM
          To: FS32NGModelrail@ yahoogroups. com
          Subject: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"

          Vince -

          However - are there any inexpensive On3-gauged chassis for building critters?  For me that is the attraction of 1:35n24.

          Charles

          > Personally I would suggest 24". There is a reasonable amount of support in
          the US for On3 track and other stuff. That is what I am doing.

          Vincent Bradley,

          Cincinnati, Ohio

        • David
          I agree entirely that the gauge and scale is a personal choice. Reading some old model railway literature is fascinating. Scale is never mentioned, only gauge.
          Message 4 of 9 , Nov 10, 2008
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            I agree entirely that the gauge and scale is a personal choice.

            Reading some old model railway literature is fascinating. Scale is never
            mentioned, only gauge.

            I like 1/32 as this is standard gauge with 1 3/4 (45mm) track and around
            1m/3' 6" with 1 1/4 (32mm) which does make it around 21" track with HO
            track. In the UK 18" narrow gauge was quite common on industrial sites
            so it seems a good scale. Of course one can always get plenty of 1/32
            gauge figures - if you do not mind car racing fans!!!!

            Just for the record. In the UK 00 gauge track is actually the same as H0
            gauge. It is the models that are 1/76 instead of the HO 1/87. Does not
            bother most people as can be seen from the strength of Hornby and
            Bachmann 00 gauge models to run on 00/H0 track. EM and proto4 are for
            the rivet counting purists.

            As I am new to 1/32, finding it useful for the gauge 1 (45mm) and gauge
            0 (32mm) track I have. I also have some H0 (16.5mm) and am thinking what
            I can do with it. Even TT 12mm track comes out at 15" in 1/32 and there
            are few railways around at that gauge, Romney Hythe and Dymchurch for
            instance.

            Actually from a modelling point of view I think the Russians have it
            best. 5' gauge railways, 60", and much better starting point for
            reasonable scales than 56 1/2". At 1/32 5' is 1 7/8".
          • Stephen Auslender
            Something else to consider. You can have a Z gauge set running in a G gauge layout as someone s garden scale model railroad. I like the idea of a model train
            Message 5 of 9 , Nov 10, 2008
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              Something else to consider.
              You can have a Z gauge set running in a G gauge layout as someone's garden scale model railroad. I like the idea of a model train within a model train layout.
              Stephen
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: David
              Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 5:32 PM
              Subject: Re: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"

              I agree entirely that the gauge and scale is a personal choice.

              Reading some old model railway literature is fascinating. Scale is never
              mentioned, only gauge.

              I like 1/32 as this is standard gauge with 1 3/4 (45mm) track and around
              1m/3' 6" with 1 1/4 (32mm) which does make it around 21" track with HO
              track. In the UK 18" narrow gauge was quite common on industrial sites
              so it seems a good scale. Of course one can always get plenty of 1/32
              gauge figures - if you do not mind car racing fans!!!!

              Just for the record. In the UK 00 gauge track is actually the same as H0
              gauge. It is the models that are 1/76 instead of the HO 1/87. Does not
              bother most people as can be seen from the strength of Hornby and
              Bachmann 00 gauge models to run on 00/H0 track. EM and proto4 are for
              the rivet counting purists.

              As I am new to 1/32, finding it useful for the gauge 1 (45mm) and gauge
              0 (32mm) track I have. I also have some H0 (16.5mm) and am thinking what
              I can do with it. Even TT 12mm track comes out at 15" in 1/32 and there
              are few railways around at that gauge, Romney Hythe and Dymchurch for
              instance.

              Actually from a modelling point of view I think the Russians have it
              best. 5' gauge railways, 60", and much better starting point for
              reasonable scales than 56 1/2". At 1/32 5' is 1 7/8".

            • Vince Bradley
              I agree whole heartedly with the idea of it being your railroad. I have always thought that was a given. I have an 7mm On16.5 layout as well as a 3/8n2
              Message 6 of 9 , Nov 11, 2008
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                I agree whole heartedly with the idea of it being your railroad.  I have always thought that was a given.  I have an 7mm On16.5 layout as well as a 3/8n2 layout.  My decision to do a 19mm track gauge comes purely from the evolution  of one layout.  The baseboards started life as an O standard gauge layout set in West Virginia which were very kindly given to me.  Really well developed scenery but the grades were very steep.  I re-laid the track using code 100 to 19mm gauge and did an On3 layout using widened Bachmann geared engines and Porters.  After some time I got the urge to do 1/32 scale and since I had always been a military modeler I had lots of stuff in that scale.  So equipment was duly built and here we are today modeling a post WW2 sand extraction plant.

                Vincent Bradley,

                Cincinnati, Ohio

                 

                From: FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com [mailto:FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Stephen Auslender
                Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 8:20 PM
                To: FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"

                 

                Something else to consider.

                You can have a Z gauge set running in a G gauge layout as someone's garden scale model railroad. I like the idea of a model train within a model train layout.

                Stephen

                ----- Original Message -----

                From: David

                Sent: Monday, November 10, 2008 5:32 PM

                Subject: Re: [FS32NGModelrail] 20" vs. 24"

                 

                I agree entirely that the gauge and scale is a personal choice.

                Reading some old model railway literature is fascinating. Scale is never
                mentioned, only gauge.

                I like 1/32 as this is standard gauge with 1 3/4 (45mm) track and around
                1m/3' 6" with 1 1/4 (32mm) which does make it around 21" track with HO
                track. In the UK 18" narrow gauge was quite common on industrial sites
                so it seems a good scale. Of course one can always get plenty of 1/32
                gauge figures - if you do not mind car racing fans!!!!

                Just for the record. In the UK 00 gauge track is actually the same as H0
                gauge. It is the models that are 1/76 instead of the HO 1/87. Does not
                bother most people as can be seen from the strength of Hornby and
                Bachmann 00 gauge models to run on 00/H0 track. EM and proto4 are for
                the rivet counting purists.

                As I am new to 1/32, finding it useful for the gauge 1 (45mm) and gauge
                0 (32mm) track I have. I also have some H0 (16.5mm) and am thinking what
                I can do with it. Even TT 12mm track comes out at 15" in 1/32 and there
                are few railways around at that gauge, Romney Hythe and Dymchurch for
                instance.

                Actually from a modelling point of view I think the Russians have it
                best. 5' gauge railways, 60", and much better starting point for
                reasonable scales than 56 1/2". At 1/32 5' is 1 7/8".

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