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Miniature railways?

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  • paglesham
    Hi all, I was mulling over a good little book on British narrow gauge recently and wondered about 10 1/4 gauge. In 1/32nd scale it would run a treat on 9mm,
    Message 1 of 11 , Apr 18, 2007
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      Hi all, I was mulling over a good little book on British narrow gauge
      recently and wondered about 10 1/4" gauge. In 1/32nd scale it would
      run a treat on 9mm, N-gauge track. Chop every other sleeper out of
      Peco N-gauge and it looks very convincing.
      Does anyone else have experience of it? How about Z-gauge posing as
      7 1/4" gauge on an elevated park line?
      Cheers, Martin
    • Woodie Greene
      Martin, there is a fellow here in Dallas who built a park railroad for his LGB layout using Z gauge equipment with 1:22.5 figures sitting on top of the loco &
      Message 2 of 11 , Apr 18, 2007
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        Martin, there is a fellow here in Dallas who built a park railroad for his LGB layout using Z gauge equipment with 1:22.5 figures sitting on top of the loco & cars. At shows, this was the most remembered layout because of the little train. I talked to him a while back and he said that the train ran so much that the loco's motor died and he abandonded the line when he found out how much it cost to fix it. I believe that something larger, maybe using N scale
        mechanisms would be more permanent however. I was considering using an old HOn3 mechanism for a smelter loco (18 inch gauge) but have since built up a small tracked vechicle that will pull the slag cars to the dump. The little tractor is modeled along the lines of a Cletrac tractor made in the 1930's here in the US. This tiny vechicle was made from an inexpensive radio control tank and is a real hoot to operate.
                    Woodie
         
         
         
        paglesham <paglesham@...> wrote:
        Hi all, I was mulling over a good little book on British narrow gauge
        recently and wondered about 10 1/4" gauge. In 1/32nd scale it would
        run a treat on 9mm, N-gauge track. Chop every other sleeper out of
        Peco N-gauge and it looks very convincing.
        Does anyone else have experience of it? How about Z-gauge posing as
        7 1/4" gauge on an elevated park line?
        Cheers, Martin


      • Martin Field
        Hi Woodie, I guess at 1/22.5 scale, Z gauge would be representing about 5 gauge, a popular one over here, but usually on elevated track. That s something
        Message 3 of 11 , Apr 19, 2007
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          Hi Woodie,  I guess at 1/22.5 scale, Z gauge would be representing about 5" gauge, a popular one over here, but usually on elevated track.  That's something I'd like to try, but I don't like the bigger scales. They seem too big and can look a little toylike.  I'm also a bit of an old curmudgeon when it comes to odd scales like 1:22.5 or 1:20.  being incorrigibly Imperial I like 1/32nd and 1/12th for large display  models of single cars or boats, but I stop at 1/32nd for scenery.  I'd rather pick a simple scale and make the track, rather than make up some wierd scale to enable bought in track to be used, which often looks all wrong.
           
          The problem with 1/32nd scale is the lack of vehicles.  British outline, anyway. The old Airfix and Revell kits can be hard to find these days and set your layout firmly in the late 50s/early 60s.
           
          Of course, all the above goes to hell in a tub when I have to confess to working in 7mm-1ft. scale!!  But that's only because I have so many road vehicles for which I made the masters that I'd be crazy not to use them on a layout.  1/43rd scale.  Twice 1/86th, but is that an excuse!!?
          Cheers, Martin


          Woodie Greene <mogollonry@...> wrote:
          Martin, there is a fellow here in Dallas who built a park railroad for his LGB layout using Z gauge equipment with 1:22.5 figures sitting on top of the loco & cars. At shows, this was the most remembered layout because of the little train. I talked to him a while back and he said that the train ran so much that the loco's motor died and he abandonded the line when he found out how much it cost to fix it. I believe that something larger, maybe using N scale
          mechanisms would be more permanent however. I was considering using an old HOn3 mechanism for a smelter loco (18 inch gauge) but have since built up a small tracked vechicle that will pull the slag cars to the dump. The little tractor is modeled along the lines of a Cletrac tractor made in the 1930's here in the US. This tiny vechicle was made from an inexpensive radio control tank and is a real hoot to operate.
                      Woodie
           
           
           
          paglesham <paglesham@yahoo. co.uk> wrote:
          Hi all, I was mulling over a good little book on British narrow gauge
          recently and wondered about 10 1/4" gauge. In 1/32nd scale it would
          run a treat on 9mm, N-gauge track. Chop every other sleeper out of
          Peco N-gauge and it looks very convincing.
          Does anyone else have experience of it? How about Z-gauge posing as
          7 1/4" gauge on an elevated park line?
          Cheers, Martin




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        • Woodie Greene
          Martin-over here, we have an internet seller called MOTOR MINT and also DIECAST DIRECT which have beautiful 1:32 scale Ford Model T s, Model A s, old White
          Message 4 of 11 , Apr 19, 2007
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            Martin-over here, we have an internet seller called MOTOR MINT and also DIECAST DIRECT which have beautiful 1:32 scale Ford Model T's, Model A's, old White vans, I could go on and on. Matter of fact, I can find more 1:32 scale antique autos & trucks here than I found available for 1:48 scale! Try these 2 sites, they may have something for you. Good luck.
                     Woodie

            Martin Field <paglesham@...> wrote:
            Hi Woodie,  I guess at 1/22.5 scale, Z gauge would be representing about 5" gauge, a popular one over here, but usually on elevated track.  That's something I'd like to try, but I don't like the bigger scales. They seem too big and can look a little toylike.  I'm also a bit of an old curmudgeon when it comes to odd scales like 1:22.5 or 1:20.  being incorrigibly Imperial I like 1/32nd and 1/12th for large display  models of single cars or boats, but I stop at 1/32nd for scenery.  I'd rather pick a simple scale and make the track, rather than make up some wierd scale to enable bought in track to be used, which often looks all wrong.
             
            The problem with 1/32nd scale is the lack of vehicles.  British outline, anyway. The old Airfix and Revell kits can be hard to find these days and set your layout firmly in the late 50s/early 60s.
             
            Of course, all the above goes to hell in a tub when I have to confess to working in 7mm-1ft. scale!!  But that's only because I have so many road vehicles for which I made the masters that I'd be crazy not to use them on a layout.  1/43rd scale.  Twice 1/86th, but is that an excuse!!?
            Cheers, Martin


            Woodie Greene <mogollonry@sbcgloba l.net> wrote:
            Martin, there is a fellow here in Dallas who built a park railroad for his LGB layout using Z gauge equipment with 1:22.5 figures sitting on top of the loco & cars. At shows, this was the most remembered layout because of the little train. I talked to him a while back and he said that the train ran so much that the loco's motor died and he abandonded the line when he found out how much it cost to fix it. I believe that something larger, maybe using N scale
            mechanisms would be more permanent however. I was considering using an old HOn3 mechanism for a smelter loco (18 inch gauge) but have since built up a small tracked vechicle that will pull the slag cars to the dump. The little tractor is modeled along the lines of a Cletrac tractor made in the 1930's here in the US. This tiny vechicle was made from an inexpensive radio control tank and is a real hoot to operate.
                        Woodie
             
             
             
            paglesham <paglesham@yahoo. co.uk> wrote:
            Hi all, I was mulling over a good little book on British narrow gauge
            recently and wondered about 10 1/4" gauge. In 1/32nd scale it would
            run a treat on 9mm, N-gauge track. Chop every other sleeper out of
            Peco N-gauge and it looks very convincing.
            Does anyone else have experience of it? How about Z-gauge posing as
            7 1/4" gauge on an elevated park line?
            Cheers, Martin




            Yahoo! Mail is the world's favourite email. Don't settle for less, sign up for your free account today.

          • Martin Field
            Hi Woodie, Thanks for that, I ll give them a look. Mind you, a line set in rural Norfolk being beset by Model Ts and As might look a wee bit strange, much as
            Message 5 of 11 , Apr 20, 2007
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              Hi Woodie, Thanks for that, I'll give them a look.  Mind you, a line set in rural Norfolk being beset by Model Ts and As might look a wee bit strange, much as I like both.  It does have a precedent though. I was picking up a hire cruiser at Benson on the River Thames for a family holiday and there were 9 Model Ts of all kinds including a racer!!  And the boat which saved the canals from dereliction, "Cressy" was powered by a T mill, running on kerosene.  If I buy any of those I'm going to end up rodding them into wild T-buckets!!  Martin

              Woodie Greene <mogollonry@...> wrote:
              Martin-over here, we have an internet seller called MOTOR MINT and also DIECAST DIRECT which have beautiful 1:32 scale Ford Model T's, Model A's, old White vans, I could go on and on. Matter of fact, I can find more 1:32 scale antique autos & trucks here than I found available for 1:48 scale! Try these 2 sites, they may have something for you. Good luck.
                       Woodie

              Martin Field <paglesham@yahoo. co.uk> wrote:
              Hi Woodie,  I guess at 1/22.5 scale, Z gauge would be representing about 5" gauge, a popular one over here, but usually on elevated track.  That's something I'd like to try, but I don't like the bigger scales. They seem too big and can look a little toylike.  I'm also a bit of an old curmudgeon when it comes to odd scales like 1:22.5 or 1:20.  being incorrigibly Imperial I like 1/32nd and 1/12th for large display  models of single cars or boats, but I stop at 1/32nd for scenery.  I'd rather pick a simple scale and make the track, rather than make up some wierd scale to enable bought in track to be used, which often looks all wrong.
               
              The problem with 1/32nd scale is the lack of vehicles.  British outline, anyway. The old Airfix and Revell kits can be hard to find these days and set your layout firmly in the late 50s/early 60s.
               
              Of course, all the above goes to hell in a tub when I have to confess to working in 7mm-1ft. scale!!  But that's only because I have so many road vehicles for which I made the masters that I'd be crazy not to use them on a layout.  1/43rd scale.  Twice 1/86th, but is that an excuse!!?
              Cheers, Martin


              Woodie Greene <mogollonry@sbcgloba l.net> wrote:
              Martin, there is a fellow here in Dallas who built a park railroad for his LGB layout using Z gauge equipment with 1:22.5 figures sitting on top of the loco & cars. At shows, this was the most remembered layout because of the little train. I talked to him a while back and he said that the train ran so much that the loco's motor died and he abandonded the line when he found out how much it cost to fix it. I believe that something larger, maybe using N scale
              mechanisms would be more permanent however. I was considering using an old HOn3 mechanism for a smelter loco (18 inch gauge) but have since built up a small tracked vechicle that will pull the slag cars to the dump. The little tractor is modeled along the lines of a Cletrac tractor made in the 1930's here in the US. This tiny vechicle was made from an inexpensive radio control tank and is a real hoot to operate.
                          Woodie
               
               
               
              paglesham <paglesham@yahoo. co.uk> wrote:
              Hi all, I was mulling over a good little book on British narrow gauge
              recently and wondered about 10 1/4" gauge. In 1/32nd scale it would
              run a treat on 9mm, N-gauge track. Chop every other sleeper out of
              Peco N-gauge and it looks very convincing.
              Does anyone else have experience of it? How about Z-gauge posing as
              7 1/4" gauge on an elevated park line?
              Cheers, Martin




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            • Paul & Baabra Napier
              The larger scales don t have to look toy like. It just seems to be the normal presentation of commercial garden railways. I model 15 inch gauge in 1:24th
              Message 6 of 11 , Apr 20, 2007
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                The larger scales don't have to look toy like. It just seems to be the
                normal presentation of commercial garden railways.

                I model 15 inch gauge in 1:24th scale. I'll put a couple of pictures in the
                photo section.

                Paul Napier
                > 1a. Re: Miniature railways?
                > Posted by: "Martin Field" paglesham@... paglesham
                > Date: Thu Apr 19, 2007 4:34 am ((PDT))
                >
                > Hi Woodie, I guess at 1/22.5 scale, Z gauge would be representing about
                > 5" gauge, a popular one over here, but usually on elevated track. That's
                > something I'd like to try, but I don't like the bigger scales. They seem
                > too big and can look a little toylike. I'm also a bit of an old
                > curmudgeon when it comes to odd scales like 1:22.5 or 1:20. being
                > incorrigibly Imperial I like 1/32nd and 1/12th for large display models
                > of single cars or boats, but I stop at 1/32nd for scenery. I'd rather
                > pick a simple scale and make the track, rather than make up some wierd
                > scale to enable bought in track to be used, which often looks all wrong.
                >
                > The problem with 1/32nd scale is the lack of vehicles. British outline,
                > anyway. The old Airfix and Revell kits can be hard to find these days and
                > set your layout firmly in the late 50s/early 60s.
                >
                > Of course, all the above goes to hell in a tub when I have to confess to
                > working in 7mm-1ft. scale!! But that's only because I have so many road
                > vehicles for which I made the masters that I'd be crazy not to use them on
                > a layout. 1/43rd scale. Twice 1/86th, but is that an excuse!!?
                > Cheers, Martin
              • Paul Napier
                Three pictures posted in new photo file Gn15 Miniature Railways. The layout is based on the 2 ft gauge Waitakere Tramlines. The rollingstock is built
                Message 7 of 11 , Apr 20, 2007
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                  Three pictures posted in new photo file Gn15 Miniature Railways. The
                  layout is based on the 2 ft gauge Waitakere Tramlines. The
                  rollingstock is built accurately to scale with one exception the
                  gauge is just 15 inch so I can use 16.5mm gauge mechanisims.

                  Paul Napier

                  --- In FS32NGModelrail@yahoogroups.com, Paul & Baabra Napier
                  <bandm@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > The larger scales don't have to look toy like. It just seems to be
                  the
                  > normal presentation of commercial garden railways.
                  >
                  > I model 15 inch gauge in 1:24th scale. I'll put a couple of
                  pictures in the
                  > photo section.
                  >
                  > Paul Napier
                  > > 1a. Re: Miniature railways?
                  > > Posted by: "Martin Field" paglesham@... paglesham
                  > > Date: Thu Apr 19, 2007 4:34 am ((PDT))
                  > >
                  > > Hi Woodie, I guess at 1/22.5 scale, Z gauge would be
                  representing about
                  > > 5" gauge, a popular one over here, but usually on elevated
                  track. That's
                  > > something I'd like to try, but I don't like the bigger scales.
                  They seem
                  > > too big and can look a little toylike. I'm also a bit of an old
                  > > curmudgeon when it comes to odd scales like 1:22.5 or 1:20.
                  being
                  > > incorrigibly Imperial I like 1/32nd and 1/12th for large display
                  models
                  > > of single cars or boats, but I stop at 1/32nd for scenery. I'd
                  rather
                  > > pick a simple scale and make the track, rather than make up some
                  wierd
                  > > scale to enable bought in track to be used, which often looks all
                  wrong.
                  > >
                  > > The problem with 1/32nd scale is the lack of vehicles. British
                  outline,
                  > > anyway. The old Airfix and Revell kits can be hard to find these
                  days and
                  > > set your layout firmly in the late 50s/early 60s.
                  > >
                  > > Of course, all the above goes to hell in a tub when I have to
                  confess to
                  > > working in 7mm-1ft. scale!! But that's only because I have so
                  many road
                  > > vehicles for which I made the masters that I'd be crazy not to
                  use them on
                  > > a layout. 1/43rd scale. Twice 1/86th, but is that an excuse!!?
                  > > Cheers, Martin
                  >
                • Woodie Greene
                  What I love about 1:32 scale modeling is the realistic human figures I have been able to find. It seems that in the smaller scales, humans tend to have little
                  Message 8 of 11 , Apr 20, 2007
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                    What I love about 1:32 scale modeling is the realistic human figures I have been able to find. It seems that in the smaller scales, humans tend to have little detail and sometimes look to be "characters" rather than scale models. Then on the other side, I have seen figures in larger scales that appear to be "gnomes" or something of that sort.In my 32 modeling, I use a combination of 1:35 military figures and available 1:32 figures and have found these to be pretty accurate representations of human beings. I am not an accomplished figure painter so my humans have minimal shading and facial features. In photographs, I try to hade this fact by showing the figures from behind or maybe a 3/4 view, but hardly never from the front(there are exceptions). What I am trying to say is that there seems to be less realism in smaller and larger scales, but I don't know why this is so. I don't mean to offend folks in 1:48 or 1:24, but this is how I view things. To add to this, let me relate that I have used toy "cowboys & indians" in various ways on my layout. Since I am modeling a wild and wooly area of the US during a time of banditos, the cowboys with side arms fill the bill and some of these little guys have as nice detailing as mainstream hobby products provide. Enough of my rambling, I have a railroad to run.
                                  W C Greene-I am crazy and I know it!    
                    Paul Napier <bandm@...> wrote:
                    Three pictures posted in new photo file Gn15 Miniature Railways. The
                    layout is based on the 2 ft gauge Waitakere Tramlines. The
                    rollingstock is built accurately to scale with one exception the
                    gauge is just 15 inch so I can use 16.5mm gauge mechanisims.

                    Paul Napier

                    --- In FS32NGModelrail@ yahoogroups. com, Paul & Baabra Napier
                    <bandm@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > The larger scales don't have to look toy like. It just seems to be
                    the
                    > normal presentation of commercial garden railways.
                    >
                    > I model 15 inch gauge in 1:24th scale. I'll put a couple of
                    pictures in the
                    > photo section.
                    >
                    > Paul Napier
                    > > 1a. Re: Miniature railways?
                    > > Posted by: "Martin Field" paglesham@.. . paglesham
                    > > Date: Thu Apr 19, 2007 4:34 am ((PDT))
                    > >
                    > > Hi Woodie, I guess at 1/22.5 scale, Z gauge would be
                    representing about
                    > > 5" gauge, a popular one over here, but usually on elevated
                    track. That's
                    > > something I'd like to try, but I don't like the bigger scales.
                    They seem
                    > > too big and can look a little toylike. I'm also a bit of an old
                    > > curmudgeon when it comes to odd scales like 1:22.5 or 1:20.
                    being
                    > > incorrigibly Imperial I like 1/32nd and 1/12th for large display
                    models
                    > > of single cars or boats, but I stop at 1/32nd for scenery. I'd
                    rather
                    > > pick a simple scale and make the track, rather than make up some
                    wierd
                    > > scale to enable bought in track to be used, which often looks all
                    wrong.
                    > >
                    > > The problem with 1/32nd scale is the lack of vehicles. British
                    outline,
                    > > anyway. The old Airfix and Revell kits can be hard to find these
                    days and
                    > > set your layout firmly in the late 50s/early 60s.
                    > >
                    > > Of course, all the above goes to hell in a tub when I have to
                    confess to
                    > > working in 7mm-1ft. scale!! But that's only because I have so
                    many road
                    > > vehicles for which I made the masters that I'd be crazy not to
                    use them on
                    > > a layout. 1/43rd scale. Twice 1/86th, but is that an excuse!!?
                    > > Cheers, Martin
                    >


                  • STEPHEN BENNETT
                    You are too modest Paul. You will probably hate me for this, but if anybody would like to see how Paul has developed his wonderful layout over the last year,
                    Message 9 of 11 , Apr 20, 2007
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                      You are too modest Paul.  You will probably hate me for this, but if anybody would like to see how Paul has developed his wonderful layout over the last year, you can see the full story here:
                       
                       
                      Ok, I had better go and hide now.
                       
                      Steve
                       
                       
                      ----- Original Message -----
                      Sent: Friday, April 20, 2007 1:41 PM
                      Subject: [FS32NGModelrail] Re: Miniature railways?

                      Three pictures posted in new photo file Gn15 Miniature Railways. The
                      layout is based on the 2 ft gauge Waitakere Tramlines. The
                      rollingstock is built accurately to scale with one exception the
                      gauge is just 15 inch so I can use 16.5mm gauge mechanisims.

                      Paul Napier

                      --- In FS32NGModelrail@ yahoogroups. com, Paul & Baabra Napier
                      <bandm@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > The larger scales don't have to look toy like. It just seems to be
                      the
                      > normal presentation of commercial garden railways.
                      >
                      > I model 15 inch gauge in 1:24th scale. I'll put a couple of
                      pictures in the
                      > photo section.
                      >
                      > Paul Napier
                      > > 1a. Re: Miniature railways?
                      > > Posted by: "Martin Field" paglesham@.. . paglesham
                      > > Date: Thu Apr 19, 2007 4:34 am ((PDT))
                      > >
                      > > Hi Woodie, I guess at 1/22.5 scale, Z gauge would be
                      representing about
                      > > 5" gauge, a popular one over here, but usually on elevated
                      track. That's
                      > > something I'd like to try, but I don't like the bigger scales.
                      They seem
                      > > too big and can look a little toylike. I'm also a bit of an old
                      > > curmudgeon when it comes to odd scales like 1:22.5 or 1:20.
                      being
                      > > incorrigibly Imperial I like 1/32nd and 1/12th for large display
                      models
                      > > of single cars or boats, but I stop at 1/32nd for scenery. I'd
                      rather
                      > > pick a simple scale and make the track, rather than make up some
                      wierd
                      > > scale to enable bought in track to be used, which often looks all
                      wrong.
                      > >
                      > > The problem with 1/32nd scale is the lack of vehicles. British
                      outline,
                      > > anyway. The old Airfix and Revell kits can be hard to find these
                      days and
                      > > set your layout firmly in the late 50s/early 60s.
                      > >
                      > > Of course, all the above goes to hell in a tub when I have to
                      confess to
                      > > working in 7mm-1ft. scale!! But that's only because I have so
                      many road
                      > > vehicles for which I made the masters that I'd be crazy not to
                      use them on
                      > > a layout. 1/43rd scale. Twice 1/86th, but is that an excuse!!?
                      > > Cheers, Martin
                      >

                    • Brian Rumary
                      ... I /think/ that the Model T was sold over here in the early days and may have even been made at the Dagenham plant. Brian Rumary, England www.rumary.co.uk
                      Message 10 of 11 , Apr 23, 2007
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                        Martin Field wrote:

                        > Mind you, a line set in rural Norfolk being beset by Model Ts and
                        > As might look a wee bit strange, much as I like both.
                        >
                        I /think/ that the Model T was sold over here in the early days and may
                        have even been made at the Dagenham plant.

                        Brian Rumary, England

                        www.rumary.co.uk
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